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tiresias Book report for the odyssey

The Odyssey is an epic poem written in a series of 24 books.  It is one of two epics written over 2500 years ago by the Western European poet, Homer.  This epic joins Odysseus 10 years after the Trojan War.  The story follows him as he attempts to return to his home in Ithaca where he reigns as King.
I am wiser after having read this book because this story taught me about some of the social practices of the Greeks.  It taught me that men were dominant and women played a submissive role in their society.  The themes in the story interest men: war, hunting, and problems of warriors while the things that interest women are left out completely or are dealt with briefly. In the Greek society, women were valued but participated in worldly affairs only with open approval from the men who directed their lives.  Penelope, Odysseus' wife, waited 20 years for his return.  Her patience and respect for her husband  shows marriage fidelity.  She is depicted as the perfect wife and mother.  
The best aspects of The Odyssey are the exciting adventures Odysseus goes through and the explanations and descriptions of the conditions and scenery.  Homer did not explain or describe things as clear as he could have; however, this was a good thing.  It served to leave something up to the imagination and creativity of the reader.  Odysseus struggles with extremely menacing foe such as a giant cyclops, Polyphemus, who eats Odysseus' men like bite-size candy and a six headed beast, able to devour men whole.  Homer allows the imagination of the reader to come up with the details like the color and size of the creatures and what the surroundings look like.
Odysseus was away at Troy for 10 years fighting a long, difficult war. Unfortunately for Odysseus the war was just the beginning of his adventure. His journey home turned out to be filled with mishaps.
First, his ship was separated from the rest of the other ships in a furious storm causing him to wash up in the land of the Lotus eaters (perhaps Libya). Eating the lotus-fruit would make you forget everything except a desire to stay on the island. Some men had to be dragged back to the ship to overcome their desires. Next they went to the island of the Cyclops (huge, one-eyed giants). A cyclops by the name of Polyphemus spotted the sailors, captured them, and kept them in his cave so he could eat them later. Odysseus told the giant his name was "Nobody." Each morning the cyclops let his sheep out to graze, but never did he let a man escape. He ate all those who tried! Eventually, the men who were still alive devised a plan to escape. Odysseus first found a stick big enough to damage the Cyclops' eye and, the minute Polyphemus fell asleep, stabbed the stick into the giant's eye. When anyone asked him what happened and who did it he told them "Nobody" did it and so no one helped him.  The next morning when the sheep went out, the men clung to the sheep's bellies so when the blind Cyclops felt them he wouldn't be able to discover the men. When Polyphemus discovered the trick, he asked Poseidon to avenge what had happened to him.  Poseidon agreed and blew Odysseus off course on his voyage home making this a much longer and more difficult task. The men were then confronted by the god Aeolus, the keeper of the wind. He tied the storm winds in a bag and gave them to Odysseus to keep so the crew would face only fair wind. Unfortunately for Odysseus, his men opened the bag thinking it was full of treasures, and when the storm winds escaped they were thrown off course, again, to the island Aeaea, home of the witch Circe. She turned unwanted visitors into pigs, and this was the fate of the first men sent for help from her by Odysseus. The god Hermes found and helped Odysseus by giving him a flower that would immunize him from Circe's spells. Knowing Circe would be unable to harm him, he ... more

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Oedipus the King

Oedipus the King: Critical Paper
Sophocles is able to accomplish to achieve several objectives in his play, Oedipus the King.  Sophocles magnificently retells a classic Greek tale while also describing the characters and their motives in great detail.  Of the characters Sophocles naturally spends the most time characterizing the protagonist of the play, Oedipus.  Sophocles conveys Oedipus' ideals, moral, and opinions about several topics throughout the play.  Among the most important and prominent of his beliefs that are revealed dealt with Oedipus' value of reasoning, intellect, inquiry, and measurement.
Sophocles portrayed Oedipus as an amiable character that the Greek audience could sympathize with and perhaps even relate to. The audience saw a respectable figure, who did not seem to commit any blatant evil, come to his destruction.  They saw an indubitable tragedy.  Sophocles ensured that the audience would view Oedipus as a respectable and  plausible hero by giving Oedipus many of the popular sentiments of the time.  These ideals were brought about by a philosophy that was thriving in Greece during Sophocles' lifetime.  Most of Oedipus' notions, can be traced back to either the dialectic Socrates in who appeared in Plato's several works, or Plato's student Aristotle.  These notions were being circulated throughout Greece during the time period which Oedipus was thought to be presented, making them common knowledge for the audience of the time (Friedlander 7).  
Of all the virtues that the Greeks, especially the Athenians held dear was wisdom, wisdom dealing with everything in life (Friedlander 8).  Socrates spurned this Greek movement for wisdom when he not only proclaimed that wisdom is the one true virtue from which all other

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virtues originated, but he also put forth the notorious quote, "The unexamined life is not worth living."("Apology" 203) .  Socrates throughout all of Plato's dialogues, advocated the importance of the wisdom and said that the desire for this wisdom is the only true path to divinity.  Aristotle later contributed to the theory when he wrote in his Nicomachean Ethics, that wisdom separated mankind from the animals and wisdom placed the Greeks closer to the gods that they worshiped and admired(435).  The Greeks constantly sought for this wisdom so that it may bring them to their greatest pleasure, the purpose in life, a true and final happiness, the aim of their Eudaimonia.( "N.E." 397)  The Greek audience for which Sophocles wrote could easily sympathize with Oedipus in his play.  This is due to the fact that Oedipus was struck down from his pedestal while merely attempting to discover himself and in that process to attain wisdom and happiness.  The goals for which Oedipus sought were noble goals that a majority of the audience members may have been seeking.  
Plato, in his Republic delineated a duelist theory of our world.  Plato wrote that our world is actually a cave where people are bound and forced to look at shadows on the wall for their entire life(67).  In Plato's opinion, reality cannot exist in this world because only shadows cast by a fire are seen(69).  According to Plato, the only way to see anything in its quintessence, the only way to see bona fide truth and wisdom is to escape the cave(71).  By escaping the cave the person could  see the fire as a deceiver of reality because that person has now seen true light and virtue.  This light, this philosophic insight of reality allows the person to return to the cave, to see objects in their veritable conformations and give them their appropriate judgement and value(74).  This theory is the basis for what Socrates in Plato's Protagoras avouched his concept of "The Art of Measurement."("Prot."163).  Socrates holds that since the world is in a cave, the

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people cannot trust their judgement or perceptions because they are only of false shadows.  Socrates proffered this theory in response to Protagoras' question of why mankind commits acts that are ultimately harmful, such as smoking or excessive drinking(165).  Aristotle believed that this was because of a weak moral habit("N.E." 411). However, Socrates did not believe in Aristotle's famous Akrasia thesis, Socrates believed that no passion or pleasure could possibly overcome the omnipotent knowledge("Prot. 141").  During the famed dialogue, Protagoras raised ... more

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  • T: Oedipus Rex T: Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex In Sophocless play Oedipus Rex Oedipus Even though fate seems to determine Oedipus\' life, . he does infact have a free will. His choices brought the prophecy to life. Only his decisions (not influenced by anybody) he made. Of course those decisions were in side of the limits set by fate. When Oedipus heard a prophesy that his going to kill his father and sleep with his mother he ran away, even when he new there were suspicions of him being the real son of his parents. There some ...
  • I: Book report for the odyssey I: Book report for the odyssey Book report for the odyssey The Odyssey is an epic poem written in a series of 24 books. It is one of two epics written over 2500 years ago by the Western European poet, Homer. This epic joins Odysseus 10 years after the Trojan War. The story follows him as he attempts to return to his home in Ithaca where he reigns as King. I am wiser after having read this book because this story taught me about some of the social practices of the Greeks. It taught me that men were dominant and women played a ...
  • R: Oedipus the King R: Oedipus the King Oedipus the King Oedipus the King: Critical Paper Sophocles is able to accomplish to achieve several objectives in his play, Oedipus the King. Sophocles magnificently retells a classic Greek tale while also describing the characters and their motives in great detail. Of the characters Sophocles naturally spends the most time characterizing the protagonist of the play, Oedipus. Sophocles conveys Oedipus\' ideals, moral, and opinions about several topics throughout the play. Among the most importa...
  • E: Oedipus, the King Summary E: Oedipus, the King Summary Oedipus, the King Summary Sophocles Oedipus, the King is a great representation of Greek tragedy and of the human experience. Within it, he explores the intricacies of human thinking and communication along with its ability to change as more information and knowledge is acquired. His primary focus as the story begins and progresses is the growth of Oedipus from an unintelligible and unenlightened mentality to its antithesis. Because the story was one familiar to most of its viewers in its time,...
  • S: Oedipus Trilogy Analysis S: Oedipus Trilogy Analysis Oedipus Trilogy Analysis Novel Analysis of The Oedipus Trilogy Oedipus Rex, or Oedipus Tyrannus as it is in Latin, could be what we call today a Freudian work of literature. The Oedipus Trilogy was originally written by Sophocles and is meant to be told in a story-telling fashion. But this Grecian tragedy was revised and translated into English by Paul Roche and put into a novel form. The Oedipus Trilogy is a novel that deals with destiny and fate. The reader is shown a series of events plotted ...
  • I: Oedipus the King I: Oedipus the King Oedipus the King Oedipus is a man of accepting his responsibilities and acting on them. Being a man of action, accepts his responsibility of a son and leaves home attempting to avoid his faith which consists of the murder of his father and marriage to his mother. As king he accepts his responsibility of the uncovering of the murder of King Laius. The search for the murderer leads to nothing but a discovery of regrettable action and literally a blinding truth. A truth that was better left undisco...
  • A: T.S. Eliot A: T.S. Eliot T.S. Eliot T.S. Eliot changed the face of poetry. He has been regarded as the most celebrated poet of his era. This Nobel Prize winning poet is credited with viewing the world as it appears, without making any optimistic judgements. Despite the ire of Mr. Eliot, it would be safe to regard him as a prophet of doom. His works reflected his frustration with mankind, and the seeming need to be released from this cold world. It was once said, How unpleasant to meet Mr. Eliot. (Time 1) His rather cy...
  • S: Lizzie Werber IX S: Lizzie Werber IX Lizzie Werber IX Humanities 1/23/03 Creon's Character in Antigone: In Sophecles' Antigone, Creon is not a good person; in fact, he is a stubborn, selfish ruler. Creon rarely listens to an opinion other than his own. He also turns his back on his own niece, Antigone, because she breaks an unfair law by burying her brother's body. Throughout the play, Creon ignores his son's pleas to spare his fianc, Antigone, from execution. Creon rarely listens to another opinion other than his own. When the bl...
  • Oepedius Rex Oepedius Rex Word Count: 3244 Oedipus Rex By: Jason Smith E-mail: lewyp@hotmail.com In Sophocless play Oedipus Rex Oedipus Even though fate seems to determine Oedipus' life, . he does infact have a free will. His choices brought the prophecy to life. Only his decisions (not influenced by anybody) he made. Of course those decisions were in side of the limits set by fate. When Oedipus heard a prophesy that his going to kill his father and sleep with his mother he ran away, even when he new there were suspic...
  • The Story of Oedipus The Story of Oedipus The Story of Oedipus Jason Garoutte August 15, 1996 Lunt / Sn. English The Story of Oedipus After reading Oedipus, one may think that in this story, there was no justice, and nobody could avoid their fate. King Laius and Queen Jocasta, fearing the prophecy of the Delphic oracle, had the young Oedipus left on Mount Cithaeron to die, but the father dies and the son marries the mother anyway. Oedipus, seemingly a good person, also tries to avoid the second prophecy, only to fulfill the first. But e...
  • Waste Waste Waste Land By Eliot In T.S. Eliot\'s The Waste Land there are several allusions. The most profound allusion in the poem is relayed through the character of Tiresias. Tiresias is a blind prophet who shows up in several different literary works. In The Waste Land Tiresias is an allusion to Christ. This allusion is best illustrated in section 3 of The Waste Land The Fire Sermon. The first description involving Tiresias occurs in The Fire Sermon, I Tiresias though blind, throbbing between two l...
  • Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law Antigone: Divine Law vs. Human Law The play entitled Antigone was written by a man named Sophocles, a scholarly author of philosophy and logic. The play Antigone is probably one of the most prominent interpretations of a tragic drama. The two main characters of the play are Antigone and Creon. There is much conflict between Antigone and Creon throughout the play, both of them having their own ideas and opinions regarding divine law versus human law. The theme that I am going to analyze is the co...
  • Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles, (as translated by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald), is replete with dramatic devices - one of which is known as Sophoclean Irony. Sophoclean Irony can be divided into two terms: unconscious and conscious irony. Unconscious irony occurs when a character speaks what he believes is the truth, but the audience (fore-armed with knowledge of the truth) knows that it is not. Conscious irony is evident when a character knows the truth but is reluctan...
  • Antigone: Divine Law Vs. Human Law Antigone: Divine Law Vs. Human Law Antigone: Divine Law Vs. Human Law The play entitled Antigone was written by a man named Sophocles, a scholarly author of philosophy and logic. The play Antigone is probably one of the most prominent interpretations of a tragic drama. The two main characters of the play are Antigone and Creon. There is much conflict between Antigone and Creon throughout the play, both of them having their own ideas and opinions regarding divine law versus human law. The theme that I am going to analyze is the co...
  • The Odyssey The Odyssey The Odyssey ODYSSEUS: A MERE MORTAL, BUT PURELY MORAL In Homer\'s Odyssey, he uses the stories of Calypso and Circe to give a reader a glimpse at Greek values. Odysseus is a perfectly moral man by Greek standards. In the Calypso episode, Odysseus demonstrates the value of faithfulness, and in the Circe episode, he illustrates Greek values in general. While both goddesses seek Odysseus to be their husband, Odysseus responds as a perfect Greek hero. During the Calypso episode, Homer teachers tha...
  • Death of a Salesman & Oedipus the King Death of a Salesman & Oedipus the King Death of a Salesman & Oedipus the King An overwhelming desire for personal contentment and unprecedented reputation can often result in a sickly twisted distortion of reality. In Sophocles\' Oedipus the King, a man well-known for his intellect and wisdom finds himself blind to the truth of h life and his parentage. Arthur Miller\'s play, The Death of a Salesman, tells of a tragic character so wrapped up in his delusional world that reality and illusion fuse causing an internal explosion that lea...
  • Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Essay on Oedipus Rex 4-3-97 In Sophocles\' Oedipus Rex, the theme of irony plays an important part through the play. What Oedipus does, what he says, and even who he is can sometimes be ironic. This irony can help us to see the character of Oedipus as truly a \'blind\' man, or a wholly \'public\' man. A great irony is found in Oedipus\'s decree condemning the murderer. Oedipus says, To avenge the city and the city\'s god, / And not as though it were for some distant friend, / But fo...
  • Oedipus and the search for truth Oedipus and the search for truth Oedipus and the search for truth A Discussion of Self-Discovery and the Pursuit of Truth in Sophocles Oedipus It is said that the truth will set you free, but in the case of Sophocles Oedipus, the truth drives a man to imprison himself in a world of darkness by gouging out his eyes. As he scours the city for truth, Oedipus ruin is ironically mentioned and foreshadowed in the narrative. With these and other devices Sophocles illuminates the kings tragic realization and creates a firm emotiona...
  • Odysseus Odysseus Odysseus In Homer\'s Odyssey, he uses the stories of Calypso and Circe to give a reader a glimpse at Greek values. Odysseus is a perfectly moral man by Greek standards. In the Calypso episode, Odysseus demonstrates the value of faithfulness, and in the Circe episode, he illustrates Greek values in general. While both goddesses seek Odysseus to be their husband, Odysseus responds as a perfect Greek hero. During the Calypso episode, Homer teachers that one must remain faithful in their hearts. T...
  • The Blind Nature of Oedipus The Blind Nature of Oedipus The Blind Nature of Oedipus One of the main themes in Oedipus the King is blindness. Not just physical blindness, but intellectual blindness as well. This issue is an effective contrasting method for Oedipus at different points in the play. By saying blindness, however, is a little misleading. It can be broken down into two sections: Oedipus\'s ability to see, and his willingness to see. The word see can be used in both contexts. Throughout the play, these two details are always at the c...
  • A;sdkflj A;sdkflj A;sdkflj Oedipus Essay (Fate) Sophocles Oedipus the King is a tragic play which discusses the tragic discovery of Oedipus that he has killed his father and married his mother. The story of Oedipus was well known to the athenians. Oedipus is the embodiement of the perfect Athenian. He is self-confident, intelligent, and strong willed. Ironically these are the very traits which bring about his tragic discovery. Oedipus gained the rule of Thebes by answering the riddle of Sphinx. Sophocles...
  • Iliad and Odyssey Iliad and Odyssey Iliad and Odyssey The views and beliefs of societies are often portrayed in the literature, art, and cinema of a certain era. The epic poems, The Iliad and Odyssey, give scholars and historians an idea how the Ancient Greek lived their everyday lives. By reading the two novels, the reader is able to experience the three thousand years old society of Homer. The various similarities between our society and the societies depicted in the Iliad and the Odyssey are surprising profuse. To name a few:...
  • Oedipus rex 7 Oedipus rex 7 Oedipus rex 7 Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles, (as translated by Dudley Fitts and Robert Fitzgerald), is replete with dramatic devices - one of which is known as Sophoclean Irony. Sophoclean Irony can be divided into two terms: unconscious and conscious irony. Unconscious irony occurs when a character speaks what he believes is the truth, but the audience (fore-armed with knowledge of the truth) knows that it is not. Conscious irony is evident when a character knows the truth but is reluct...
  • The waste land The waste land the waste land The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot Part 1 - Burial of the Dead April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers. Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade, And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten And drank coffee, and talked for an hour. Bin gar ke...
  • Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex Oedipus the King #9;Oedipus the King is a great play whose qualities of inscrutability and of pervasive ironically quickly come to complicate any critical discussion(). Sophocles\' play Oedipus the King fits into a tragedy because it recounts the events in the life of Oedipus Rex, arouses pity and fear in the audience, and ends in an unhappy catastrophe (Harmon). #9;Oedipus\' life began in Thebes as the son of Laius and Jocasta. Apollo had placed a curse on Oedipus. The cursed said t...