Symptoms Of Dissociative Identity Disorder


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symptoms of dissociative identity disorder Schizophrenia

During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society and
themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely to their
communities. During the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more than any other
cost in our national economy. As a result, strategic planning has been made to reduce
costs. The political decision made to deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started
with the appearance of phenothiazine medications. Dramatically reducing the instability
influenced by psychosis, these medications were of great significance to many
individuals with serious mental disorders. At both the state and federal levels,
legislators looked at the high cost of long-term psychiatric hospitalization. Social
scientists guaranteed them that community-based care would be in the best interests of
all concerned: the mentally ill and the general, tax-paying public (Barry 13). It was
believed that a social breakdown syndrome would develop in chronically mentally ill
persons who were institutionalized. The characteristics of this syndrome were
submission to authority, withdrawal, lack of initiative, and excessive dependence on the
institution.
While deinstitutionalization was kindhearted in its primary logic, the actual
execution of the concept has been greatly undermined by the lack of good community
alternatives. At this time a large amount of the individuals using community mental
health treatment services are the homeless. Nearly half of the homeless are chronically
mental ill. These individuals are often separated from their families and all alone on the
dangerous street. These homeless schizophrenics stay away from social structures
such as community health treatment centers. Since they start a new life of
independence they often stop taking their medications, become psychotic and out of
place, and begin to live on the street. Since the schizophrenics are deinstitutionalized
they are thrown into a whole new world of independence. Since their brain functions
different than the usual human being they cant cope with the problems of life. The
schizophrenics drive themselves crazy wanting to kill themselves and others in order to
escape from this perplexing world.
Schizophrenia is the most common psychoses in the United States affecting
around one percent of the United States population. It is characterized by a deep
withdrawal from interpersonal relationships and a retreat into a world of fantasy. This
plunge into fantasy results in a loss of contact from reality that can vary from mild to
severe. Psychosis has more than one acceptable definition. The psychoses are
different from other groups of psychiatric disorders in their degree of severity,
withdrawal, alteration in affect, impairment of intellect, and regression.
The severity of psychoses are considered major disorders and involve confusion
in all portions of a persons life. Psychosis is seen in a wide range of organic disorders
and schizophrenia. These disorders are severe, intense, and disruptive. A person with
a psychotic disorder suffers greatly, as do those in his or her immediate environment.
Individuals suffering from withdrawal are said to be autistic. That is, the person
withdraws from reality into a private world of his or her own. The psychotic individual is
more withdrawn than a person with a neurotic disorder or any other mental disorder.
The affect, mood, or emotional tone in a person with a psychotic disorder is immensely
different from that of normal affect. In the mood disorders, one observes the
exaggeration of sadness and cheerfulness in the form of depression and mania. In the
schizophrenic disorders, affect may be exaggerated, flat, or inappropriate.
In psychotic disorders, the intellect is involved in the actual psychotic process,
resulting in derangement of language, thought, and judgment. Schizophrenia is called
a formal thought disorder. Thinking and understanding of reality are usually severely
impaired. The most severe and prolonged regressions are seen in the psychoses,
regression. There is a falling back to earlier behavioral levels. In schizophrenia this
may include returning to primitive forms of behavior, such as curling up into a fetal
position, eating with ones hands, and so forth. The symptoms of schizophrenia usually
occur during adolescence or early adulthood, except for paranoid schizophrenia, which
usually has a later onset. The process of schizophrenia is often slow, with the
exception of catatonia, which may have an abrupt onset. As an adolescent, a person
who later develops schizophrenia is often antisocial with others, lonely, and depressed.
Plans for the future may appear to others as vague or unrealistic.
It is possible that there may be a preschizophrenic phase a year or two before
the disorder is diagnosed. This phase may include neurotic symptoms such as acute or
chronic anxiety, phobias, obsessions, and compulsions or may ... more

symptoms of dissociative identity disorder

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Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia


During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society
and themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely
to their communities.  During the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more
than any other cost in our national economy.  As a result, strategic planning
has been made to reduce costs.  The political decision made to
deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started with the appearance of
phenothiazine medications.  Dramatically reducing the instability influenced by
psychosis, these medications were of great significance to many individuals with
serious mental disorders.  At both the state and federal levels, legislators
looked at the high cost of long-term psychiatric hospitalization.  Social
scientists guaranteed them that community-based care would be in the best
interests of all concerned: the mentally ill and the general, tax-paying public
(Barry 13).  It was believed that a social breakdown syndrome would develop in
chronically mentally ill persons who were institutionalized.  The
characteristics of this syndrome were submission to authority, withdrawal, lack
of initiative, and excessive dependence on the institution.
While deinstitutionalization was kindhearted in its primary logic, the
actual execution of the concept has been greatly undermined by the lack of good
community alternatives.  At this time a large amount of the individuals using
community mental health treatment services are the homeless.  Nearly half of the
homeless are chronically mental ill.  These individuals are often separated from
their families and all alone on the dangerous street.  These homeless
schizophrenics stay away from social structures such as community health
treatment centers.  Since they start a new life of independence they often stop
taking their medications, become psychotic and out of place, and begin to live
on the street.  Since the schizophrenics are deinstitutionalized they are thrown
into a whole new world of independence.  Since their brain functions different
than the usual human being they can't cope with the problems of life.  The
schizophrenics drive themselves crazy wanting to kill themselves and others in
order to escape from this perplexing world.
Schizophrenia is the most common psychoses in the United States
affecting around one percent of the United States population.  It is
characterized by a deep withdrawal from interpersonal relationships and a
retreat into a world of fantasy.  This plunge into fantasy results in a loss of
contact from reality that can vary from mild to severe.  Psychosis has more than
one acceptable definition.  The psychoses are different from other groups of
psychiatric disorders in their degree of severity, withdrawal, alteration in
affect, impairment of intellect, and regression.
The severity of psychoses are considered major disorders and involve
confusion in all portions of a person's life.  Psychosis is seen in a wide range
of organic disorders and schizophrenia.  These disorders are severe, intense,
and disruptive.  A person with a psychotic disorder suffers greatly, as do those
in his or her immediate environment. Individuals suffering from withdrawal are
said to be autistic.  That is, the person withdraws from reality into a private
world of his or her own.  The psychotic individual is more withdrawn than a
person with a neurotic disorder or any other mental disorder. The affect, mood,
or emotional tone in a person with a psychotic disorder is immensely different
from that of normal affect.  In the mood disorders, one observes the
exaggeration of sadness and cheerfulness in the form of depression and mania.
In the schizophrenic disorders, affect may be exaggerated, flat, or
inappropriate.
In psychotic disorders, the intellect is involved in the actual
psychotic process, resulting in derangement of language, thought, and judgment.
Schizophrenia is called a formal thought disorder.  Thinking and understanding
of reality are usually severely impaired.  The most severe and prolonged
regressions are seen in the psychoses, regression.  There is a falling back to
earlier behavioral levels.  In schizophrenia this may include returning to
primitive forms of behavior, such as curling up into a fetal position, eating
with one's hands, and so forth.  The symptoms of schizophrenia usually occur
during adolescence or early adulthood, except for paranoid schizophrenia, which
usually has a later onset.  The process of schizophrenia is often slow, with the
exception of catatonia, which may have an abrupt onset.  As an adolescent, a
person who later develops schizophrenia is often antisocial with others, lonely,
and depressed. Plans for the future may appear to others as vague or
unrealistic.
It is possible that there may be a preschizophrenic phase a year or two
before the disorder is diagnosed.  This phase may include neurotic symptoms such
as acute or chronic anxiety, phobias, obsessions, and compulsions or may reveal
dissociative features.  As anxiety mounts, indications of a thought disorder may
appear.  An adolescent ... more

symptoms of dissociative identity disorder

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  • S: Dissociative Identity Disorder S: Dissociative Identity Disorder Dissociative Identity Disorder Dissociative Identity Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder (Dissociative Identity Disorder) is the existence within a person of two or more distinct personalities. The different personalities are referred to as alters. Alters may have experienced a distinct personal history, self-image, and identity, including a separate name, as well as age. At least two of these personalities recurrently take control of the persons behavior. There are a few typical types of ...
  • Y: Schizophrenia Y: Schizophrenia Schizophrenia During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society and themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely to their communities. During the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more than any other cost in our national economy. As a result, strategic planning has been made to reduce costs. The political decision made to deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started with the appearance of phenothiazine medications. Dramatically ...
  • M: Schizophrenia M: Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Schizophrenia During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society and themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely to their communities. During the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more than any other cost in our national economy. As a result, strategic planning has been made to reduce costs. The political decision made to deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started with the appearance of phenothiazine medications....
  • P: Science P: Science Science Cruz 1 Schizophrenia During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society and themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely to their communities. Unfortunately in the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more than any other cost in our national economy. Strategic planning has been made to reduce costs, as a result, The political decision made to deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started with the appearance of phenothiazine m...
  • T: Multiple T: Multiple Multiple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first recognized in the 1700's but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disorder. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the disorder and this dropped it from being discussed at any credible mental health meetings. S...
  • O: Multiple Personality Dissorder O: Multiple Personality Dissorder Multiple Personality Dissorder Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first acknowledged in the 1700\'s but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disease. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the affliction and this dropped it from being discussed at any credible mental health meeting...
  • M: Theories M: Theories Theories Theoretical Perspectives of Certain Disorders Anxiety Disorder Psychoanalysts believe that anxiety disorders are caused by internal mental conflicts often involving sexual impulses. These impulses cause an overuse of the ego\'s defense system that fails over time. This shows that the unacceptable impulses the ego has blocked are the generalized anxiety disorders. These blocked impulses cause an unconscious state of apprehension for which the person does not know the cause of. Phobias, h...
  • S: Reaction Paper S: Reaction Paper Reaction Paper Reaction Paper 1 (Sample Reaction Paper) Ron Gerrard, HWS Psychology Department My paper is based on an article from the texts web site (chapter 9) entitled Lack of sleep ages bodys systems. The basic claim of the article is that sleep deprivation has various harmful effects on the body. The reported effects include decreased ability to metabolize glucose (similar to what occurs in diabetes) and increased levels of cortisol (a stress hormone involved in memory and regulation o...
  •  : Personailty : Personailty Personailty Multiple Personality Disorder More than two million cases can be found altogether in psychological and psychiatric records of multiple personality disorder also called dissociative identity disorder. It is often thought that multiple personality disorder is a trick, a bizarre form of play-acting that is committed by manipulative, attention-seeking individuals. It is not. Multiple personality disorder is a disorder of hiding wherein 80-90% of multiple personality disorder patients do ...
  • O: Schizophrenia O: Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Schizophrenia During the 1950s, mentally disordered people who were harmful to society and themselves could be treated with medications and were able to return safely to their communities. During the 1980s, the cost of health care increased more than any other cost in our national economy. As a result, strategic planning has been made to reduce costs. The political decision made to deinstitutionalize chronic mental patients started with the appearance of phenothiazine medications...
  • F: Theories F: Theories Theories Theoretical Perspectives of Certain Disorders Anxiety Disorder Psychoanalysts believe that anxiety disorders are caused by internal mental conflicts often involving sexual impulses. These impulses cause an overuse of the egos defense system that fails over time. This shows that the unacceptable impulses the ego has blocked are the generalized anxiety disorders. These blocked impulses cause an unconscious state of apprehension for which the person does not know the cause of. Phobias, ho...
  •  : Multiple Personality Disorder : Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder More than two million cases can be found altogether in psychological and psychiatric records of multiple personality disorder also called dissociative identity disorder. It is often thought that multiple personality disorder is a trick, a bizarre form of play-acting that is committed by manipulative, attention-seeking individuals. It is not. Multiple personality disorder is a disorder of hiding wherein 80-90% of multiple personality dis...
  • D: Dissociative Identity Disorder D: Dissociative Identity Disorder Dissociative Identity Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder (Dissociative Identity Disorder) is the existence within a person of two or more distinct personalities. The different personalities are referred to as alters. Alters may have experienced a distinct personal history, self-image, and identity, including a separate name, as well as age. At least two of these personalities recurrently take control of the persons behavior. There are a few typical types of alters that they multiple would...
  • I: Multiple Personality Disorders I: Multiple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorders By Philip Ausherman Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first recognized in the 1700\'s but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disorder. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the disorder and this dropped it from being...
  • S: Dissociative Identity Disorder S: Dissociative Identity Disorder Dissociative Identity Disorder Assessment and Treatment of Depression in Adolescence Abstract Today\'s youth are faced with many challenges including depression, substance use and suicide. Depressive disorders in adolescence are a major health concern. Depression often disrupts normal development due to the negative impact it has on social and educational functioning. This paper focuses on adolescent depression, as well as its assessment and treatment. Additionally, an examination of both risk a...
  • S: Multiple Personality Disorder S: Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder More than two million cases can be found altogether in psychological and psychiatric records of multiple personality disorder also called dissociative identity disorder. It is often thought that multiple personality disorder is a trick, a bizarre form of play-acting that is committed by manipulative, attention-seeking individuals. It is not. Multiple personality disorder is a disorder of hiding wherein 80-90% of multiple personality dis...
  • O: Multiple Personality Disorders O: Multiple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorders By Philip Ausherman Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first recognized in the 1700's but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disorder. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the disorder and this dropped it from being ...
  • C: No title C: No title Lack Of Sleep Ages BodyS Systems Reaction Paper 1 (Sample Reaction Paper) Ron Gerrard, HWS Psychology Department My paper is based on an article from the texts web site (chapter 9) entitled Lack of sleep ages bodys systems. The basic claim of the article is that sleep deprivation has various harmful effects on the body. The reported effects include decreased ability to metabolize glucose (similar to what occurs in diabetes) and increased levels of cortisol (a stress hormone involved in memo...
  • I: Multiple Personality Disorder I: Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder Many People in One Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) is a mental disease that exists in about one percent of the population. Much research supports the existence of this disease and its origins, causes and effects on the people in who suffer with it. This essay will clearly define Multiple Personality Disorder along with a detailed synopsis of the disease itself. The diagnosis, alter personalities, different treatments and views wil...
  • A: Multilple Personality Disorders A: Multilple Personality Disorders Multilple Personality Disorders Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was first recognized in the 1700\'s but was not understood so therefore it was forgotten. Many cases show up in medical records through the years, but in 1905, Dr. Morton Prince wrote a book about MPD that is a foundation for the disorder. A few years after it was published Sigmund Freud dismissed the disorder and this dropped it from being discussed at any credible mental health meetings....
  • T: Theoretical perspectives T: Theoretical perspectives theoretical perspectives Theoretical Perspectives of Certain Disorders Psychoanalysts believe that anxiety disorders are caused by internal mental conflicts often involving sexual impulses. These impulses cause an overuse of the egos defense system that fails over time. This shows that the unacceptable impulses the ego has blocked are the generalized anxiety disorders. These blocked impulses cause an unconscious state of apprehension for which the person does not know the cause of. Phobias, how...
  • I: Multiple Personality Disorder I: Multiple Personality Disorder Word Count: 1291 Multiple Personality Disorder More than two million cases can be found altogether in psychological and psychiatric records of multiple personality disorder also called dissociative identity disorder. It is often thought that multiple personality disorder is a trick, a bizarre form of play-acting that is committed by manipulative, attention-seeking individuals. It is not. Multiple personality disorder is a disorder of hiding wherein 80-90% of multiple personality disorder patient...
  • V: Reaction Paper V: Reaction Paper Reaction Paper Reaction Paper 1 (Sample Reaction Paper) Ron Gerrard, HWS Psychology Department My paper is based on an article from the texts web site (chapter 9) entitled Lack of sleep ages bodys systems. The basic claim of the article is that sleep deprivation has various harmful effects on the body. The reported effects include decreased ability to metabolize glucose (similar to what occurs in diabetes) and increased levels of cortisol (a stress hormone involved in memory and regu...
  • E: Multiple Personality Disorder E: Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder, renamed dissociative identity disorder, is the suggestion that one body may serve as a home to multiple individuals, each with their own distinct personality. (Grolier encyclopedia) This suggestion is accepted by psychiatrists world wide and is recognized as a serious mental illness. However, all of the personalities that are present in an individual are normal. They act as any other normal personality, because the multiple personaliti...
  •  : Multiple Personality Disorder : Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder The most famous dissociative disorder is Multiple Personality Disorder, also known as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). It is estimated that one in one hundred people may suffer from Multiple Personality Disorder and other Dissociative Disorders. With correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment, people have the potential for complete recovery. Multiple Personality Disorder is a condition in which a person has more than one identity, each of which speaks, acts an...