The Last Hurrah

David
David
David By Earle Birney A generation of Canadian schoolchildren and university students has grown up knowing the story of a mountain climber who fell 50 feet to a narrow ledge, was badly injured, then pushed off the ledge to his death by his friend in an act of mercy. The climber's name was David, also the title of the story. Its author was Earle Birney. At one time or another in the last 25 years, David has been required reading for high schools and universities in every Canadian province. Mount
Last Hurrah
Last Hurrah
Last Hurrah Edwin O'Connor's novel The Last Hurrah presents an effective view of the difficult and complex life of the Irish-American community in Boston of the 1950's. The author uses a number of characterizations to produce themes that relate to the political and social considerations of this era. He also provides most of the accounts in his novel from a single perspective, that of Frank Skeffington. He is the main character. This character in particular enables O'Connor to present the topic w
1984
1984
1984 Journal #3 Never before have I witnessed such a blunt interpretation of how Orwell perceives this life we all live, how brutal and honest it can be. And also vice versa, the lies cheating and hatred that go on every day, not so far off from the life experienced in 1984 and our lives now. Throughout this last section of the story, we were mostly placed in this ironic Ministry of Love that Winston had to go through. One of the main things that stood out to me was his resilience, up to a cert
Marshall Field Whole Sale Store
Marshall Field Whole Sale Store
Marshall Field Whole Sale Store The Chicago School marks the beginning of a new development in architecture. Based on the earlier Victorian models, from about 1885 great commercial structures are built with new designs and new construction techniques. During these later years Richardson produced the buildings upon which his reputation principally rests. He designed houses, community libraries, suburban railroad stations, educational buildings, and commercial and civic structures. Instead of the
Patriotism
Patriotism
Patriotism Patriotism By Charles Eliot Norton Address before the Men's Club of the Prospect Street Congregational Church, Cambridge, Mass., June 7, 1898. There are moments in every man's life, in the life of every nation, when, under the excitement of passion, the simple truths which in common times are the foundation upon which the right order and conduct of life depend are apt to be forgotten and disregarded. I shall venture tonight to recall to you some of these commonplace truths, which in t