Sir Gawain And The


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Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Gawain, a knight of the famed King Arthur, is depicted as the most noble of knights in the poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Nonetheless, he is not without fault or punishment, and is certainly susceptible to conflict. Gawain, bound to chivalry, is torn between his knightly edicts, his courtly obligations, and his mortal thoughts of self-preservation. This conflict is most evident in his failure of the tests presented to him. With devious tests of temptation and courage, Morgan le Fay is able to create a mockery of Gawains courtly and knightly ideals. Through the knight Gawain, the poem is able to reveal that even knights are human too with less than romantic traits.
In order to satirize Gawain's courtly ways, the poet must first establish the presence of perfect chivalric code in Gawain, only to later mock that sense of perfection with failure. This establishment of chivalric code is created in part through the expression used to describe Gawain throughout the poem. He is described as "noble" and "goodly" on more than one occasion, giving the reader a positive understanding of the poem's hero (405, 685). This courtly view of Gawain is further expresses by his noble acceptance of the Green Knight's beheading game, in order to "release the king outright" from his responsibility (365). Gawain was the first to accept the Green Knight's terms. His acceptance of the beheading game before any other person brings the assumption that Gawain represents the most noble of Arthur's court. Lastly, even the Green Knight compares him to other knights as "pearls to white peas" (2364), a sign of his higher status among men.
By portraying Gawain as noble and honorable, the poet is able to shock the reader with actions that are uncharacteristic of a chivalrous knight. The first of these conflicting actions is obvious in the temptation of Gawain by his host's lady. This lady, the huntress, seeks to pursue Gawain in order to fool him into actions that contrast the knightly ideal. She will do anything to accomplish these actions in him, even through sexual temptations. With another man's wife pursuing him, Gawain must be courtly to the lady, but at the same time must deny her advances. This unavoidable conflict creates a fear within Gawain. Upon discovering that the lovely lady was approaching him in bed, Gawain lays a sleep, in order to "try her intent" (1199). This action reveals Gawain's fear that his host's lady is pursuing him. This unavoidable fear causes his failure of courtliness, for Gawain would have claimed a kiss from the lady, but did not. The lady ridicules him for this, even though, the situation was unavoidable. Gawain must abide by his morals and abstain from immoral thoughts, while at the same time being a courteous guest. Moreover, Gawain is forced to make a choice between courtesy and adultery, either of which would result in the dishonor of the lady ,his host, or Gawain himself. By choosing to return each of the following kisses received, Gawain is able to pass the first of the tests. Even the passing of this test generates a conflict of morals within Gawain, revealing that his knightly order and supposed courtliness are of no use in a situation of hardship.
The second action uncharacteristic of an ideal knight is Gawain's dishonesty, brought out in the second test. Realizing that his death at the hands of the Green Knight was inevitable, Gawain's thoughts of self-preservation dominated his actions rather than thoughts of honor. His acceptance of the girdle of security from his host's lady exposes Gawain's fear for his life. A truly ideal and perfect knight would not keep the girdle in order to save his own life, because the host knight asked for an exchange of all things gained during the day. Yet at the same time, Gawain must obey the rules of courtliness, and accept the girdle from the host's lady. Therefore, Gawain falls into an unavoidable situation, in which taking or denying the girdle will result in insult to his courtliness, his honor, or his life. Gawain is human, and does fear for his life. Therefore, he keeps the girdle ... more

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THe Hobbit

Hobbit Essay
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien is set in a fantasy world that has differences, as well as similarities, to our own world. The author has created the novels world, Middle Earth, not only by using imagination, but by also adding details from the modern world. Realistic elements in the book enable readers to relate to the setting, yet have the ability to "imagine" exciting events and organisms not found on Earth.

The majority of differences between Middle Earth and todays world are found in objects and the actions of characters that can not be carried out or created in our world. The most abundant example of this in The Hobbit is the presence of magic. Gandalf, the wizard, is able to help the adventurers out of a number of dangerous situations by using his magical powers to harm their enemies. He set Wargs afire while he was trapped in a tree and created a bolt of lightening to kill many of the Goblins who had surrounded the group in a cave. The magical ring, which was a key to helping the group succeed in the book, allowed he who was wearing it to become invisible to others. Also, there was a black stream in Mirkwood that made he who drank out of it suddenly very drowsy and forgetful of previous events. All of these examples of happenings and objects found in Middle Earth are physically impossible in a world such as ours.

Several of the organisms in the book are not known to exist on Earth. Hobbits, of course, are fictional characters, as are dwarves, elves, goblins, and trolls. Many species of animals are able to vocally communicate with humans and dwarves in the novel, which is not possible on our planet. Beorn, a human who is able to morph into other creatures at an instant, is an excellent example of such fiction. The dragon, Smaug, is the main adversary of the fourteen adventurers and is a type of creature that has long been used in fantasy writing. Although most of the characters species are merely creations of the author, they all exhibit a sense of realism that causes them to seem almost human.

There is a vast difference between Middle Earth and the modern world, but there are also several similarities. In Middle Earth, there live humans, and hobbits, which are very much similar to miniature people. The language spoken and food consumed in the novels world are found in modern society. Also, the fact that Thorin Oakenshield is heir of the throne of the King under the Mountain and inherits all of the riches of the kingdom is like the parliamentary system of England. The environment and terrain the group passes through on their adventure is primarily the same as lands unchanged by humans and surrounded by nature appear today. In the novel, there are forests with miles of trees, high, rocky mountains, and flowing rivers just as there are here on Earth.

It is not possible that a fantasy story such as The Hobbit could occur in real life. However, I do believe that fantasy can effectively teach us about reality. There are morals, lessons, and themes to be found within the text that can help us gain knowledge and live our lives more productively.

Bilbo Baggins took a stand and raised enough courage to do something he had never thought of doing before, going on a great adventure. This choice caused Bilbo to gain endurance, bravery, an appreciation of his life, and many valuable experiences that made him a wiser person. Thorins selfish act of not wanting to share the dragons riches with the other towns citizens caused only bad events to occur. This teaches us that kindness and giving to others will not only benefit them, but will also cause you to feel more content inside. When the group of fourteen was staying with Beorn to rest, he gave them suggestions and information about the journey that lie ahead of them. He informed them about a black stream out of which they should never drink, no matter how thirsty they may be, for it would put them to sleep for days. If they ... more

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  • S: Sir Gawain and Green Knight Essays: Allegory Sir G S: Sir Gawain and Green Knight Essays: Allegory Sir G Sir Gawain and Green Knight Essays: Allegory Sir Gawain Green Knight Essays Allegory in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Discuss the allegorical significance of the following words of the Green Knight, You are so fully confessed, your failings made known,/ And bear the plain penance of the point of my blade,/ I hold you polished as a pearl, as pure and as bright/ As you had lived free of fault since first you were born . These words are uttered by the Green Knight almost immediately after he deli...
  • I: Sir Gawain I: Sir Gawain Sir Gawain Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Gawain, a knight of the famed King Arthur, is depicted as the most noble of knights in the poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Nonetheless, he is not without fault or punishment, and is certainly susceptible to conflict. Gawain, bound to chivalry, is torn between his knightly edicts, his courtly obligations, and his mortal thoughts of self-preservation. This conflict is most evident in his failure of the tests presented to him. With devious tests of t...
  • R: THe Hobbit R: THe Hobbit THe Hobbit Hobbit Essay The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien is set in a fantasy world that has differences, as well as similarities, to our own world. The author has created the novels world, Middle Earth, not only by using imagination, but by also adding details from the modern world. Realistic elements in the book enable readers to relate to the setting, yet have the ability to \imagine\ exciting events and organisms not found on Earth. The majority of differences between Middle Earth and today...
  •  : To Be Or Not To Be... A Knight : To Be Or Not To Be... A Knight To Be Or Not To Be... A Knight To Be or Not To Be. A knight To be or not to be a Knight truly is the question presented through this story, which is a tale of Gawains trials and tribulations on his journey to the Green Chapel. First, before acknowledging Gawain as being or not being a knight, one must first know what a knight is. In reference to the Pentangle a knight or Gawain must be: first, he was faultless in his five senses, Nor found ever to fail in his five fingers, And all his fealty...
  • G: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain Green K G: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain Green K Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain Green Knight Essays Sir Gawain and the Green Knight In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight the three hunts of Bercilak were similar to the three seductions of Gawain. Bercilak and Gawain made a bargain at the castle. Bercilak said Whatever I earn in the woods will be yours, whatever you win will be mine in exchange. (Gawain 81) The Green Knight tells Gawain that he was sent by Morgana Le Fay because she wanted to test Gawain's pride and determine the tru...
  • A: Morte d Arthur A: Morte d Arthur Morte d' Arthur In order to create an interesting story, one must combine a number of elements. Those elements should captivate the reader's attention. Things required to entertain a reader have changed over time. Nowadays, all that is needed is a little lust combined with an impossible action-filled plot. But in the days of knights and kings; lords and ladies; kings and queens; and honorable battles-realism, magic, and a touch of religion kept the reader begging for more. Sir Thomas Malory capi...
  • W: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Stanza 74 W: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Stanza 74 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Stanza 74 That Gawain is Mary\'s Knight is made clear as he is robed for battle; the pentangle represents the five joys of Mary, and he has that queen\'s image / Etched on the inside of his armored shield (648-649). As long as he is solely focused on his quest for the Green Knight, he derives his prowess and courage from his special relationship with Mary. On his journey to look for the Green Knight he is beset by a number of hardships, and is finally brought to...
  • A: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight A: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Women, Courtly Love and the Creation Myth in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a great epic written in fourteenth century Europe by the Pearl poet, emphasizes the opposition of Christian love to Courtly love in the 13th century through the dilemma of Sir Gawain, one of the great knights of the Arthurian round table. By examining the women in the poem, Gawains dilemma becomes a metaphor for the contrast of these two distinct types of...
  • I: A medieval contest between the I: A medieval contest between the A medieval contest between the A Medieval Contest In comparing and contrasting the Arthurian Legends and J.R.R. Tolkiens book The Fellowship of the Ring, it is almost like a medieval contest between the two with many of the similarities coming from the customs of the Middle Ages. A look at the make up of the groups involved, the moral code, the protagonist, the antagonist, the use of supernatural elements and the knightly quest involved in each book shows how alike they are but yet different. T...
  • N: Chivalry N: Chivalry chivalry Ancient to Modern: The Transformation of Chivalry During the medieval era, great adventures and accomplishments of unimaginable feats were told of mortal humans know as Knights. Knights were seen to be the elite, displaying their gentleman-like manners throughout every aspect, which they lived, from social events to acts of brutal combat against their adversaries. Every action of a Knight would be done with honor, courage, respect and courtesy. Knights who demonstrated these characteris...
  •  : Animalistic Characters In Medieval Times : Animalistic Characters In Medieval Times Animalistic Characters In Medieval Times The many temptations of life bring people to act differently through personality changes. The characters in Sir Gawain the Green Knight change their personalities through temptation. Through the Christmas time, Bertilak, king of the castle, decides to go hunting. While he is hunting, his wife is hunting or seducing Gawain. Men tempted with sex by women often act with certain animalistic instincts; in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by the Pearl Poet, the ...
  • A: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight A: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight September 2003 Final Essay In the days of knights, kings, and heroic epics, circumcision was not done for sanitary means as is often the case today. Being circumcised was something of a rebirth. It was done when it was realized that one was a sinner and it was promised that they would reform under the grace of God. Sir Gawain was on a mission upon entering the green chapel; he sought to become the next Fisher King. King Arthur became a Fisher King and Jesus was th...
  • N: An AnalysisDeath In British Literature N: An AnalysisDeath In British Literature An AnalysisDeath In British Literature British Literature Essay Death is inevitable and what happens after death will always be a mystery to the living. For this reason, the afterlife has always been a topic which artists have chosen to explore in their works. Throughout the chronology of British literature, artists have used societys views as a basis to examine the afterlife, and look at it in new ways. The afterlife has been a theme in British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period of Beowulf...
  • D: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Test of One Knights Chivalric Attributes D: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Test of One Knights Chivalric Attributes Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Test of One Knight's Chivalric Attributes Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Test of One Knight's Chivalric Attributes Loyalty, courage, honor, purity, and courtesy are all attributes of a knight that displays chivalry. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is truly a story of the test of these attributes. In order to have a true test of these attributes, there must first be a knight worthy of being tested, meaning that the knight must possess chivalric attributes to beg...
  •  : Camelot: The Archetypal Environment : Camelot: The Archetypal Environment Camelot: The Archetypal Environment In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the setting plays an integral role in the meaning of the poem. The three settings are all inseparable from the events which take place there and the manner in which Gawain is affected by the inhabitants. Camelot, Lord Bertilak\'s castle and the Green Chapel and their characters are considerably distinct from each other, each affecting and appealing to Gawain in a particular way. Because of its many positive qualities and fam...
  • T: The Development of Desire T: The Development of Desire The Development of Desire The development of the male warrior, throughout literature, has a direct relationship with the development of western civilization. The attributes a warrior holds, fall respectively with the attributes that each society held as valuable. These characteristics, started by societies ideals, become the warriors only reasons for continuing their heroics. The ideals however do change with each warrior. At the beginning we have a warrior with one mission, which later the war...
  • H: Excalibur H: Excalibur Excalibur Excalibur Guards, Knights, Squires; prepare for battle! hollers one of the kings noble knights. The rumbling thunder of horses trotting across the wooden mote bridge echoes throughout the castle. Brave knights gallop their horses into the foggy mist where swords and shields smash, the sounds of their armor and their striking metals echo across the land they battle over. Blood oozes from severed bodies as limbs are sliced off men like cheese. These barbaric and berserk behaviors were ...
  • E: J.R.R. Tolkien (1892-1973) gained a reputation dur E: J.R.R. Tolkien (1892-1973) gained a reputation dur jo J.R.R. Tolkien (1892-1973) gained a reputation during the 1960s and 1970s as a cult figure among youths disillusioned with war and the technological age. His continuing popularity evidences his ability to evoke the oppressive realities of modern life while drawing audiences into a fantasy world. John Ronald Reuel was born on the third of January, 1892, at Bloemfontein, South Africa, where his father, Arthur, had taken a position with the Bank of Africa. In 1895 Tolkiens mother, Mabel Suffi...
  • Sir Gawain & The Green Knight Sir Gawain & The Green Knight Sir Gawain & The Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight A knight rides into the hall dressed entirely in green. The knight is large, well- dressed, and imposing, but he does not wear armor nor carry a shield. Rather, he holds some holly in one hand and a huge ax in the other. The Green Knight, without first introducing himself, demands to speak with whoever is the head of the court. King Arthur answers the Green Knights call to the head of the company and asks him to dismount and eat. How...
  • Sir Gawian and the Green Knight Sir Gawian and the Green Knight Sir Gawian and the Green Knight In the Epic poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the unnamed author uses Sir Gawain to illustrate the heroic ideals of chivalry, loyalty and honesty in fourteenth century England. The poem depicts the society of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. In the poem, Gawain is the ideal of virtue and all that is good. Throughout the poem, however, his character is constantly tested and his integrity is compromised. In the end, Gawain proves that, although h...
  • Gawain And Green Knight Gawain And Green Knight Gawain And Green Knight What is Sir Gawains true personality like? Sir Gawain has two sides to his personality. The first side to Sir Gawains personality is the way in which everyone else expects him to be. Sir Gawain has a certain honor to uphold as the noblest knight of the Round Table. Sir Gawain is expected to be chilvarous by being courageous, loyal, honest, courteous, the best at everything in which he attempts, and have a strong will to resist temptations of evil nature. Everyone believ...
  • Pardoners Tale Pardoners Tale Pardoners Tale The Pardoner's Tale vs. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Throughout literature, relationships can often be found between the author of a story and the story that he writes. In Geoffrey Chaucer's frame story, Canterbury Tales, many of the characters make this idea evident with the tales that they tell. A distinct relationship can be made between the character of the Pardoner and the tale that he tells. Through the Prologue to the Pardoner's tale, the character of the Pardoner is rev...
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a Middle English romance poem written by an anonymous West Midlands poet also credited with a lot of other poems written during that time. The protagonist, Sir Gawain, survives two tests: a challenge, which he alone without the assistance of King Arthur's knights accepts, to behead the fearsome Green Knight and to let him retaliate a year later at the distant Green Chapel; and the temptation to commit adultery with the wife of Lo...
  • Arthurian Legend Arthurian Legend Arthurian Legend Arthurian Legend Abiding by the seven sins and containing qualities such as bravery, loyalty, and respect make up the Arthurian Legend. Knights of the past, such as King Arthur and Sir Gawain became renowned heros because of those qualities. The Arthurian Legend answers a need in American Society today for three reasons. First, it is a reminder of the great past. It is impressive that the chilverous, brave knights were real. I think people are astonished that a person could actu...
  • Sir Gawain And The Green Knight Sir Gawain And The Green Knight Word Count: 1141 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Sir Gawain Faces Temptation Sir Gawain was known as a noble and honest man who was willing to stare death in the face to protect King Arthur. However, the courtly Sir Gawain is submitted to the unexpectednot to the test he expects, but to one he does not expect (qtd. in Spearing). The underlying theme throughout the entire poem is temptation, which, is Sir Gawains greatest challenge because he is not aware of it. He faltered not nor feared But ...