Search Results for pan africanism

WEB DuBois Presented Objectively
WEB DuBois Presented Objectively
WEB DuBois Presented Objectively W.E. B. DuBois Presented Objectively William Edward Burghardt DuBois was an intellectual "Jack of All Trades." DuBois was a scholar , activist, writer, and an international diplomat. During his time, he was at least involved in if not in the forefront of every movement advocating equal rights for African Americans. DuBois provided the impetus for numerous organizations and periodicals. Dubois dedicated a part of himself to numerous worthy causes, but that same ge
African culture
African culture
African culture When W.E.B. Du Bois announced in his marvelous work Souls of Black Folk, that the "problem of the 20th Century is the color line . . ." immediately he set out a social and analytical paradigm that instantly recognized that the major racial problem in America was that existing between Blacks and Whites. Nevertheless, we are still, at the end of the 20th Century, struggling with the question of what kind of democratic society we are, or whether we will be a democratic society at al
African culture
African culture
African culture When W.E.B. Du Bois announced in his marvelous work Souls of Black Folk, that the "problem of the 20th Century is the color line . . ." immediately he set out a social and analytical paradigm that instantly recognized that the major racial problem in America was that existing between Blacks and Whites. Nevertheless, we are still, at the end of the 20th Century, struggling with the question of what kind of democratic society we are, or whether we will be a democratic society at al
An Army, A Navy, and Ebonics
An Army, A Navy, and Ebonics
An Army, A Navy, and Ebonics CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. The Ebonics controversy 2.1 Declaration of a separate language 2.2 Bilingual education funding 2.3 Classroom teaching and Ebonics 2.4 Summary and comment 3. Afro-American languages and dialects 3.1 Black English: the creolist position 3.2 Black English: the dialectologist position 3.3 Toward a synthesis 3.4 On the issue of African influence 3.5 Summary and comment 4. Language, identity, and politics 4.1 Obtaining linguistic recognition 4.2