Richard Kleindienst


Find More Richard Kleindienst

Looking for essays on richard kleindienst? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

richard kleindienst All the Presidents Men




Richard Nixon's first term as president will always be connected with the Watergate scandal, the biggest political scandal in United States history. Various illegal activities were conducted including burglary, wire tapping, violations of campaign financing laws, sabotage, and attempted use of government agencies to harm political opponents to help Richard Nixon win reelection in the 1972 presidential elections. There were about 40 people charged with crimes related to the scandal. Most of them were convicted by juries or pleaded guilty. Watergate involved more high-level government officials than any previous scandal. It has been etched in the minds of millions and is still being recalled today when faced with the present day scandal of President Clinton. In All The President's Men, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, former Washington Post reporters, recount, illustrate, and analyze the Watergate scandal time and their work in reporting and revealing these events for the newspaper.
The story begins on "June 17, 1972. Nine o'clock Saturday morning. Early for the telephone (13)." The telephone rings to awaken Bob Woodward. His editor wakes Woodward to inform him about a break-in at the Democratic headquarters that occurred late the previous night. The authorities arrested five men, one White House employee and four Cuban-American Miami citizens. They were found to be in the possession of high-tech surveillance and communication devices, along with hundreds of dollars, mostly in $100 bills in sequential order. In addition, the authorities also discovered two address books, a telephone number for Howard E. Hunt, consultant to the White House.  The listing had small notations W. House and W.H. (22).  This was the first indication that the President and his cabinet might be involved in this burglary. Woodward and Bernstein investigated this White House connection. As they delve deeper into this lead, they continuously discover larger crimes where more of the prominent White House staff was involved.
Woodward and Bernstein print all their findings in their articles in the Washington Post. The tremendous pressure on Nixon through their in-depth articles, along with the FBIs investigations of him and his cabinet, ultimately led to the Presidents resignation.
When Bernstein and Woodward were writing this book and their articles, they must have had some idea of the significance of their work. After all, they were printing a series of articles that pointed straight to the President. At this time, only one other impeachment inquiry existed, so Bernstein and Woodwards work had to be as accurate as possible. They made sure of this through a few precautionary measures. First, they agreed never to let an article go to print unless they both fully agreed the article was worthy of printing should. When they were investigating the truth of a fact or statement, they always made sure that they checked it with at least two sources. When they made a large implication, such as that of H.R. Haldeman, Assistant to the President, they investigated with as many as four or five sources. To make sure that they were not overly ambitious or biased, they frequently ran their story ideas, topics, and facts, over with their editors, Sussman and Rosenfeld.
All The President's Men was fair and detailed, which adds significantly to their credibility, which was the purpose they protected and looked out for. Woodward and Bernstein had a motivation driving their investigation and reporting that was very unlike any that could be found today. They seemed to be enticed by their love for writing and strife for the truth. Today, some journalists seem to be motivated by fame, wealth, or politics. Many people would have written those articles simply to go down in history books or to bring down high officials for personal gain. This aspect did not appear to be present in All The President's Men. Bernstein and Woodward are acknowledged as being the ones to uncover Nixon's "dirty tricks." The authors did not present Watergate as a scandal or an attempt to smear President Nixons image. While they were uncovering these events, they must have been considering the political uproar Watergate would cause as well as the political precedent it set. Comparing today's investigations of Bill Clinton to Richard Nixon, Woodward and Bernstein must be a little reluctant ... more

richard kleindienst

Research on Richard Kleindienst

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Richard Kleindienst" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Richard Kleindienst essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Richard Kleindienst and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Richard Kleindienst

Find essay on Richard Kleindienst

Word Count: 1167


The Watergate Scandal

The Watergate Affair, is the worst political scandal in U.S. history.  It led to the resignation of the president, Richard M. Nixon, after he became implicated in an attempt to cover up the scandal.  The Watergate Affair  refers to the break-in and electronic bugging
in 1972, of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate apartment, and office building complex in Washington D.C.  The term was applied to several related scandals.  More than thirty administration officials, campaign officials, and financial contributors pleaded guilty or were found guilty of breaking the law.  Nixon faced possible indictment after his resignation, received from his successor, Gerald Ford, a full pardon for all of his offenses he may or had committed (Branford 2).
In 1971, Nixon created  the Special Investigation Unit, know as the plumbers, their job was to plug all new leaks.   Later that year, his agents broke into the office of Dr. Lewis Feilding, and Dr. Daniel Ellsberg, who had given copies of the Pentagon Papers, a secret account of U.S. involvement in Indochina, to newspapers.  After Nixon learned of the break-in, he and his top advisors decided to say that the break-in had been carried out for naitonal security reasons(Watergate 3).  Later in 1971, H.R. Haldeman, Nixons chief of staff, was notified by an assistant, Gordon Stachan, that the U.S. Attorney General John Mitchell and John Dean, counsel to the president, had discussed the need to develop a political intelligence capability at the Committee for Reelection of the President(CRP).  Some of the personnel and tactics identified with the activities became associated with efforts aimed at the Democrats.  In early 1972, Mitchell assumed a new position as director of the CRP and discussed political espionage plans with Dean.  Mitchell also provided the proposal to break-in to the Watergate(Branford 3).  On June 17, 1972, police arrested five men at the DNC headquarters.  The men were adjusting electronic equipment that they had installed in May.  One of the men arrested was James McCord, security coordinator for the CRP(Watergate 3).  Ehrlichman was ordered to destroy incriminating documents and tapes.   Then L. Patrick Gray resigned as acting director of the FBI, later admitting he had destroyed documents given to him by Ehrlichman and Dean.  On June 23, 1972, Nixon learned about  Mitchells possible link with the operation, and Nixon instructed the FBI to stop the inquiry into the source of money used by the men who tapped the building.  He said that the investigation would endanger the CIA operations.  Dean and the others subsequently sought to induce CIA officials to cooperate with this plan.  On July 1, Mitchell left the CRP, citing personal reasons.  On August 29, Nixon declared that no one in the administration, then employed, was involved in the Watergate.  Although money found in the possession of the wire tappers was traced to the CRP, such evidence was insufficient to implicate high officials.  On September 15, only the five men first arrested, plus Liddy and E. Howard Hunt , one of the plumbers, were indicted (Carson 2).
In January 1973, two months after Nixons reelection, the seven indicted men were tried before Judge John Sirica in the U.S. district court in Washington D.C.  Five pleaded guilty, and McCord and Liddy were convicted of conspiracy, burglary, and illegal wiretapping.  Meanwhile, suspicions grew that the break-in was part of the broad program of political espionage.  The U.S. Senate voted to conduct an investigation, and the Grand Jury, continued to hear witnesses.  During hearings of his nomination to be permanent director of the FBI, Gray revealed that he had given FBI Watergate files to Dean.  His testimony suggested that other top White House aides were involved in the clandestine activities.  In March and April, Nixon met often with top aides to plan responses to the Gray revelations and to prepare for the investigations.    On March 23, Judge Sirica read a letter from McCord charging that witnesses had committed perjury at the trial and that the defendants had been pressured to  plead guilty for them to remain silent.  McCord, hoping to avoid a severe sentence, cooperated with investigators and implicated Dean and Magruder, in the break-in.  
Investigators were also told that Mitchell had approved the break-in, ... more

richard kleindienst

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • R: Watergate was the name of the biggest political sc R: Watergate was the name of the biggest political sc Watergate was the name of the biggest political scandal in United States history. It included various illegal activities designed to help President Richard M. Nixon win reelection in 1972. Watergate resulted in Nixon\'s resignation from the presidency in 1974. Watergate differed from most previous political scandals because personal greed apparently did not play an important role. Instead, Watergate represented an attack on one of the chief features of a democracy--free and open elections. The W...
  • I: All the Presidents Men I: All the Presidents Men All the Presidents Men Richard Nixon\'s first term as president will always be connected with the Watergate scandal, the biggest political scandal in United States history. Various illegal activities were conducted including burglary, wire tapping, violations of campaign financing laws, sabotage, and attempted use of government agencies to harm political opponents to help Richard Nixon win reelection in the 1972 presidential elections. There were about 40 people charged with crimes related to th...
  • C: The Watergate Scandal C: The Watergate Scandal Word Count: 1167 The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Affair, is the worst political scandal in U.S. history. It led to the resignation of the president, Richard M. Nixon, after he became implicated in an attempt to cover up the scandal. The Watergate Affair refers to the break-in and electronic bugging in 1972, of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate apartment, and office building complex in Washington D.C. The term was applied to several related scandals. More than ...
  • H: Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? H: Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? What was Watergate? Watergate is a term used to describe a complex web of political scandals occurring between 1972 and 1974. On January 20, 1969, Richard M. Nixon had become the thirty-seventh president of the United States. As Nixon entered the White House, he was full of bitterness and anger about past defeats, and about years of perceived slights from others in the political establishment. Nixon, a Republican, once stated that, Washington i...
  • A: The Watergate Scandal A: The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Affair, is the worst political scandal in U.S. history. It led to the resignation of the president, Richard M. Nixon, after he became implicated in an attempt to cover up the scandal. The Watergate Affair refers to the break-in and electronic bugging in 1972, of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate apartment, and office building complex in Washington D.C. The term was applied to several related scandals. More ...
  • R: The Watergate Scandel R: The Watergate Scandel The Watergate Scandel Jeremy Madsen American Perspectives Research Paper On June 17th 1972 five men were arrested after breaking into the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate complex These five men were eventually linked to many high-ranking White House officials, members of the Committee to Re-elect the President and even to President Richard M. Nixon himself. To this day it has not been determined what these five men were doing in this office however the investigations...
  • D: The Political Career Of Richard Nixon D: The Political Career Of Richard Nixon The Political Career Of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon\'s Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon\'s Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon\'s Appointment\'s B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon\'s plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon\'s Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Rich...
  •  : Watergate Scandal : Watergate Scandal Watergate Scandal THE WATERGATE SCANDAL Watergate is a hotel in Washington D.C. where the Democratic National Committee held their campaign headquarters. The current president at the time was Richard M. Nixon, who was involved in the scandal himself and which lead to the cause of his resignation. The Watergate scandal should not have happened, but it did and it caused the American people to judge less of their government system. The scandal began on June 17, 1972, with the arrest of five men who...
  • K: The Political Lift of Richard Nixon K: The Political Lift of Richard Nixon The Political Lift of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon\'s Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon\'s Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon\'s Appointment\'s B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon\'s plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon\'s Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Richar...
  • L: Watergate1 L: Watergate1 Watergate1 Watergate, designation of a major U.S. political scandal that began with the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic party\'s campaign headquarters, later engulfed President Richard M. Nixon and many of his supporters in a variety of illegal acts, and culminated in the first The burglary was committed on June 17, 1972, by five men who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Washington, D.C. Their arrest eventu...
  • E: The Watergate Scandal E: The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal The mistrust most Americans feel toward the government officials and political parities of today can be traced back to the Watergate scandal of 1972, which led to the resignation of an American president. The crimes of the Watergate scandal included political burglary, bribery, extortion, wiretapping (phone tapping), conspiracy, obstruction of justice, destruction of evidence, tax fraud, illegal use of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Federal Bureau of Investig...
  • I: The Watergate Scandal I: The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Affair, is the worst political scandal in U.S. history. It led to the resignation of the president, Richard M. Nixon, after he became implicated in an attempt to cover up the scandal. The Watergate Affair refers to the break-in and electronic bugging in 1972, of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate apartment, and office building complex in Washington D.C. The term was applied to several related scandals. More ...
  • N: Watergate Scandal N: Watergate Scandal Watergate Scandal The Watergate Affair, is the worst political scandal in U.S. history. It led to the resignation of the president, Richard M. Nixon, after he became implicated in an attempt to cover up the scandal. The Watergate Affair refers to the break-in and electronic bugging in 1972, of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate apartment, and office building complex in Washington D.C. The term was applied to several related scandals. More than thirty administration...
  • D: Nixon: His Cover-Up D: Nixon: His Cover-Up Nixon: His Cover-Up Nixon: His Cover-up Who would have knew a U.S. President would have done a crime? Unless it was a good reason that is. This incident is called the Watergate scandal. At the Watergate Hotel in Washington D.C. was where this all started. This led to even more complications. In this paper I hope to prove that even though Nixon had a cover-up plan it failed to succeed. In order to accomplish this several questions come to mind: Was Nixon trying to hide anything? Where there any e...
  • I: Watergate I: Watergate Watergate Watergate Scandal Introduction Watergate was the name of the biggest political scandal in United States history. It included various illegal activities constructed to help President Richard Nixon win reelection in the 1972 presidential elections. Watergate included burglary, wire tapping, violations of campaign financing laws, and sabotage and attempted use of government agencies to harm political opponents. It also involved a cover-up of conduct. There were about 40 people charged wit...
  • E: The Political Lift of Richard Nixon E: The Political Lift of Richard Nixon The Political Lift of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon's Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon's Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon's Appointment's B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon's plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon's Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Richard Nixo...
  • N: The Political Career of Richard Nixon N: The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon's Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon's Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon's Appointment's B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon's plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon's Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Richard Nixon went to Washington, D.C. In Januar...
  • S: Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? S: Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? What was Watergate? Watergate is a term used to describe a complex web of political scandals occurring between 1972 and 1974. On January 20, 1969, Richard M. Nixon had become the thirty-seventh president of the United States. As Nixon entered the White House, he was full of bitterness and anger about past defeats, and about years of perceived slights from others in the political establishment. Nixon...
  • T: Scandal watergate T: Scandal watergate scandal watergate THE WATERGATE SCANDAL Watergate is a hotel in Washington D.C. where the Democratic National Committee held their campaign headquarters. The current president at the time was Richard M. Nixon, who was involved in the scandal himself and which lead to the cause of his resignation. The Watergate scandal should not have happened, but it did and it caused the American people to judge less of their government system. The scandal began on June 17, 1972, with the arrest of five men who...
  • The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon\'s Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon\'s Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon\'s Appointment\'s B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon\'s plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon\'s Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Rich...
  • Watergate 1972 Watergate 1972 Watergate 1972 Watergate was the name of the biggest political scandal in United States history. It included various illegal activities designed to help President Richard M. Nixon win reelection in 1972. Watergate resulted in Nixon\'s resignation from the presidency in 1974. Watergate differed from most previous political scandals because personal greed apparently did not play an important role. Instead, Watergate represented an attack on one of the chief features of a democracy--free and open e...
  • The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon The Political Career of Richard Nixon 1. Nixon's Beginning in Politics 2. Emergence in National Politics A. The Hiss Case B. Nixon's Political Obituary C. Resurgence as a presidential candidate 3. The 37th President A. Nixon's Appointment's B. Foreign Policy 1. Nixon's plans for Europe 2. Vietnam C. Domestic Policy 4. Nixon's Second Administration A. Reelection B. Watergate A few weeks after the United States entered World War II a young man named Richard Nixon went to Washington, D.C. In Januar...
  • WaterGate WaterGate waterGate Watergate, designation of a major U.S. political scandal that began with the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic party\'s campaign headquarters, later engulfed President Richard M. Nixon and many of his supporters in a variety of illegal acts, and culminated in the first resignation of a U.S. president. The burglary was committed on June 17, 1972, by five men who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Wash...
  • Watergate Watergate Watergate Watergate, designation of a major U.S. political scandal that began with the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic party\'s campaign headquarters, later engulfed President Richard M. Nixon and many of his supporters in a variety of illegal acts, and culminated in the first resignation of a U.S. president. The burglary was committed on June 17, 1972, by five men who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Wash...
  • A Question of COnsitutionality The Death Penalty i A Question of COnsitutionality The Death Penalty i A Question of COnsitutionality The Death Penalty in America Capital Punishment has existed in civilized society for thousands of years. One of the worlds largest religions is based on the execution of its leader. In America the execution of Timothy McVeigh is around the corner, and is possibly the nations and the worlds news story for upcoming weeks. In the United States the death penalty has existed since the creation of the union, and well before that in colonial America. Public executions ...