Religious Festival


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religious festival the sun also rises

Summary and Analysis of Epigraph and Chapters 1-4
The Epigraph:
Hemingway prefaces the novel with two quotes, one by Gertrude Stein, painter, poet, and social center of the American expatriates in 1920s Paris, and one by Ecclesiastes from the Bible. Stein's quote proclaims that Hemingway's is a "lost generation." Her title stuck and has since defined the moral, emotional, and physical emptiness of the young post-WWI generation, devastated by war and aimlessly seeking comfort in the superficial, hedonistic atmosphere of the 1920s. The quote from Ecclesiastes compares the permanence of the earth to the transience of men; Hemingway altered the words "'The sun also riseth'" for his novel's title. In one sense, the words of Ecclesiastes are an optimistic antidote to Stein's pessimism; though Hemingway's generation may be "lost," soon mankind will find himself again ("'One generation passeth away, and another generation commeth'"). On another level, the quote embraces the rejuvenation nature offers. This promise of natural rejuvenation will play an important role in the novel.
Chapter I:
The narrator, Jake Barnes, describes Robert Cohn, who was the middleweight boxing champion of Princeton. Cohn took up boxing, though he disliked it, to compensate for the inferiority complex he developed as a Jew at Princeton. Cohn's nose was flattened while boxing, and Jake says no one he knows from Cohn's class remembers Cohn. From one of New York's richest, most prominent Jewish families, Cohn emerged from Princeton with low self-esteem, had an unsuccessful marriage, and lost most of his inheritance.
Cohn moved to California and edited and backed an arts magazine until it folded. A woman, Frances, who had been using Cohn for his rising status, moved with him to Paris so he could write a novel. There, Cohn became friends with Braddocks, his "literary" friend, and Jake, his "tennis" friend. Frances, wanting to marry Cohn, kept him on a short leash.
Analysis
Cohn's time in Princeton is almost an allegory of a young soldier's going off to war: his early dreams of glory are quickly shattered, his body is physically changed (the flattened nose), and he leaves embittered. He is quickly exploited by two women, the first instance of the theme of manipulative sexuality that Hemingway will explore in greater depth.
We are also introduced into a social world of little responsibility -- Jake's crowd travels and drinks freely, Jake refers to himself as Cohn's "tennis" friend, and money is taken care of by rich relatives (Cohn is given an allowance by his mother).
Hemingway also deploys his influential style of spare, unadorned prose to good effect here; in giving a run-down of Cohn's character, Jake reveals himself as a quasi-reporter (indeed, he works for the newspaper, though not as a reporter, and Hemingway himself was a former journalist) who does not reveal much about himself. Jake doesn't even tell the reader his name -- we only find out when another character calls him by his first name -- or about his job, but lets you in on both his factual and emotional life through others.
For instance, Jake is somewhat sympathetic to the abuse and exploitation heaped on Cohn, and we intuit that Jake, too, must harbor similar feelings of inferiority. Though we know little about Jake's relationship with him so far, we will see that Jake is similar in some ways -- Cohn's flattened nose, for instance, foreshadows a less visible impairment Jake has (for Cohn, however, Jake maintains that the flattened nose has improved his appearance).
Chapter II:
Jake recounts how Cohn left for America, sold his book to a good publisher who praised his efforts, had several affairs, and returned to Paris arrogant and rude. He strove to emulate W.H. Hudson's book, "The Purple Land," in which an Englishman has numerous romantic adventures.
One day, Cohn interrupts Jake in his newspaper office and proposes that they travel to South America, at Cohn's expense. Jake doesn't want to, but Cohn feels his life is slipping by him. Jake invites him to have a drink, since he knows he will be able to get rid of Cohn after one drink. At a caf, Cohn expresses anxiety that their lives are half-over; Jake says he doesn't worry about death. ... more

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The Romantic Poets: And The Role Of Nature

The Romantic Poets: and the role of Nature
Craig Williamson
The poetry of the English Romantic period (1800-1832), often contain many descriptions, and ideas of nature, not found in most writing. The Romantic poets share several charecteristics in common, certainly one of the most significant of these is their respective views on nature.Which seems to range from a more spiritual, if not pantheistic view, as seen in the works of William Wordsworth, to the much more realistic outlook of John Keats. All of these authors discuss, in varrying degreess, the role of nature in acquiring meaningful insight into the human condition. These writers all make appeals to nature as if it were some kind of living entity calls are made for nature to rescue the struggling writer, and carry his ideas to the world. One writer stated in his introduction to a Romantic anthology:
The variety of this catalogue implies completedness;
surely not phase or feature of the outer natural world
is without its appropriate counterpart in the inner world
of human personality. Nature, then, can be all things to
all men. To the revolutionary Shelley, the rough wind
wails, like the poet himself, for the world's wrong; or it
lifts his own thoughts to scatter them like leaves, like
glowing ashes, over the world in an apocalyptic prophecy
of the coming Utopian spring. To Keats, beset by longing
and heart-ache, the happiness of the nightingale's song
intensified an unbearable consciousness of unattainable
pleasures. (6)
Nature took a different role in each of the Romantic poets, and even the PreRomantics, and Victorians writings, but each of these writers has that one major thing in common: They all write extensively on the role of nature in the lives of people.
The English Romantic poets, hailing mostly from the Lakeside district of England, would have grown up in a region that is known for its natural beauty. These writers did not know the ugliness of the city, nor do they have any experience of the crowded streets, and polluted air of London. To these writers, the world is a very beautiful place. There are wonderful virgin forests, pristine lakes and rivers, and beautiful wildlife, making this region a wealthy little virtual paradise. Certainly this would (at least partly) account for the facination with the natural world that can be found in these poets. They mostly grew up seeing nature in its highest form of beauty, and they were definately influenced by their environments.
Throughout the course of this paper, four poems, written by three poets, will be discussed in some detail. Additional poems and poets will also be mentioned briefly as this discussion progresses. They are Wordsworth's Ode on Intimations of Immortality, stanzas: One, two, four, and eleven, as well as parts of five and eight. The second Wordsworth poem is: My Heart Leaps Up. The second poem will be Percy-Byshe Shelley's Ode to the West Wind. And the final poem will be: Bright Star by John Keats. Each of these poems contain strong references to nature, and its role in the developement of human identity, and additionaly, of the sacredness, almost divinity that is to be found in nature. Throughout these poems, the reader will find, as has been mentioned, a varrying (yet still somewhat common) idea of the importance of nature. This should help the reader to catch a little insight into how the English Romantics viewed man and his role within nature, as well as nature's role within human society and specificaly, how nature can effect and individuals development over his lifetime.
Let us now turn to the first poet that we will discuss, William Wordsworth. Wordsworth, along with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, released a book of poems titled: Lyrical Ballads. With this book came the beggining of the Romantic period. Wordsworth declared that:  Poetry, should be written in the language of the common man and should be about incidents and situations from common life (Francis, 36). Clearly this is a rejection of the Neo- Classical tradition, and an embracing of ordinary things and people. Wordsworth can really be classified by his very romanticized view held toward nature:
A love of nature is one of Wordsworth's predominate
themes. For him, birds, trees, and flowers represent
and invisible spirit that is present everywhere ... more

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