Realization


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realization Cloning Debate

Cloning is a process that has been debated for decades, and all the arguments
are now coming to a head. The thought of cloning has been around since the turn
of the century, but was not given much publication until the genre of science
fiction pursued it in novels, comics, magazines and television shows in the
mid-1950s. When Dolly, a sheep, was cloned, many people, including
scientists, religious leaders, politicians, and common people, were held in
fascination as the cloning process was explained to them on every major network
television channel. People watched as the theory was put to use in certain
stages of sheep and frogs being cloned. Many people also came to the realization
that cloning is a scientific blight upon humanity, which should not be pursued
any further. Cloning will, for the most part, degrade the ethics and civility of
humanity until the population is either: a) no longer recognizably human, or b)
subjected to various forms of barbarianism including slavery, mass production of
spare humans, and the coercement of the gene pool. Cloning, if stopped,
will leave many resources free for other scientific pursuits that could better
humanity, or raise the overall standard of living. The freed manpower could also
be put to more useful scientific tasks, such as food manipulation, or ecology
control. If the research of cloning is not stopped, the end result could well be
a eugenics war, or the inevitable death of the most powerful species on the
planethumanity. Large majorities of people still presume that cloning will
better society, and that the level of technological improvement gained in the
short term justifies the few minor adjustments that would accommodate the
new & improved society. These same people propagate the use of cloning
to harvest the extra bodies for needed body parts, as opposed to people donating
parts, and having people who need the organs sign a waiting list. Another
argument for cloning is that individuals with desirable characteristics could be
cloned as substitutes; e.g., a strong man could be cloned for construction
workers, a smart person could be cloned for scientific R&D, a man with
musical ability could be cloned to help an orchestra. None of the above-stated
arguments are compelling enough to merit cloning as an ethical line of research.
The flaws included within each pro-cloning statement are innumerable, but, due
to space constraints, only a few will be mentioned. Harvesting bodies for organs
is one of the most primitive and savage ideas ever put forth by human society,
especially considering that we are eclipsing the twenty-first century. To waste
time and manpower on an obviously immoral cause is despicable. To create a human
is to care for and nourish it until it is ready to face the world on its own.
If a clone wants to donate an organ it is entirely up to the clone, not the
creator. It is similar to becoming impregnated and then selling the baby to
science for dissection. Cloning people for various tasks originally relegated to
the clonee is not unlike slavery in that the clone is given no consideration as
to what its wants and desires are. As a society, people should fell ashamed
to have put forth the proposition of creating slaves; how is a clones rights
and privileges any different from the original persons? Clones should not be
considered to be of a lower standard than naturally conceived humans are.
Having, hopefully, successfully refuted the pro-cloning stance, it is time to
support the reasons for stopping cloning research and implementation. To start,
the topics of clone/original discrimination will be pursued, followed by the
topic of eugenics. When a clone is created, the world will gaze in wonder, as
the marvel of technological science is an exact replica of a human being, down
to the last strand of hair. When the planet is teeming with clones, the world
will whimper in fear as they see unoriginal humans taking what precious
resources we have left. This will, in all likelihood, lead to a new sort of
discrimination, in which clones are the ostracized group, and humans are the
superiors. It will be reminiscent of former times when Blacks and Indians
were treated with contempt and suffered ridicule. This is all on the premise
that there will be more humans than clones, of course. If the planet ends up
with more clones than humans, well, we originals are out of luck. Theres no
other possibility. Every human being has in their genes the desire to live, even
if it means at ... more

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Narrative of the Captivity of

The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson is a personal account, written by Mary Rowlandson in 1682, of what life in captivity was like.  Her narrative of her captivity by Indians became popular in both American and English literature.  Mary Rowlandson basically lost everything by an Indian attack on her town Lancaster, Massachusetts in 1675; where she is then held prisoner and spends eleven weeks with the Wampanoag Indians as they travel to safety.  What made this piece so popular in both England and America was not only because of the great narrative skill used be Mary Rowlandson, but also the intriguing personality shown by the complicated character who has a struggle in recognizing her identity.  The reoccurring idea of food and the word remove, used as metaphors throughout the narrative, could be observed to lead to Mary Rowlandsons repression of anger, depression, and realization of change throughout her journey and more so at the end of it.
The idea of food is constantly used throughout the Mary Rowlandsons narrative, because it was the only essential need that she was concerned everyday to survive.  Before the captivity, Mary Rowlandson was an innocent housewife that knew nothing of what suffering was like.  She has always had plenty of food, shelter, and clothing.  As a reader, you can see how her views towards the Indians choice of food gradually changes throughout her journey, and how it is related to the change in her own self.  After tragically losing all of her family and her home, she had to repress her feelings to move on with the Indians to survive.  She described the Wampanoag Indians at Ravenous beasts when she was captivated, which shows the anger that she felt towards the Indians at that time.  The Indians diet was really different from the whites.  Rowlandson hardly ate a thing the first week she was held captive.  She described the Indians food as filthy trash, and she could starve and die before [she] ate such things (306).  As Rowlandsons hunger began to eat her up inside out, she had to repress her spoiled taste and anger in order to survive.  During the seventh remove you can see her views of the Indians food change as she got two ears of Indian corn (307) and didnt want to give it up.  When one Indian asked her can you eat horse liver? (307), Rowlandson replied that she would try if he would give a piece (307).  As she ate it, she described the horse liver as a savory bit it was to me.  She explain to herself that for to the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet (307).  You can see that Rowlandson has experienced a change in her view towards the Indians food.  She began being disgusted with their food then gradually precious it.  There were many times where Rowlandson felt like she could just lay down and die right there, but as the journey goes on she says I shall not die but live, and declare the works of the Lord (308).  Her desire to live was encouraged through her dependence on God, which in turn helped repress her true feelings of depression because of the sufferings she was enduring.  As Rowlandsons travels goes on you could see that she has learned to accept the Indians culture.  In the eight remove she says I boiled my peas and bear together, and invited my master and mistress to dinner,(309).  That statement by Rowlandson does not seem like shes in captivity and that shes actually suffering.  She also made clothes for the Indians, which they very much appreciated.  Rowlandson realizes as she thinks to herself that throughout her time with the Indians not one of them offered the least imaginable miscarriage to me(310).    She has fit herself into the Wampanoag Indian society by suppressing her true feelings of anger and depression towards the Indians in order to survive.  During the eighteenth remove she stole a piece of horse feet from a child.  Then she claims that the things that my soul refused to touch are as my sorrowful meat(318).  Rowlandson seems to be willing to do anything to ... more

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  • E: Cloning Debate E: Cloning Debate Cloning Debate Cloning is a process that has been debated for decades, and all the arguments are now coming to a head. The thought of cloning has been around since the turn of the century, but was not given much publication until the genre of science fiction pursued it in novels, comics, magazines and television shows in the mid-1950s. When Dolly, a sheep, was cloned, many people, including scientists, religious leaders, politicians, and common people, were held in fascination as the cloning pr...
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