The Beach

3 PAGES
570 WORDS

The Beach
Nathan Ward
September 26, 2001
Narration

The Beach


Brothers and sisters grow up arguing, screaming, and fighting from dusk until dawn.  The arguments range from talking on the telephone, sharing the bathroom, to who gets dibs on the car.  These confrontations appear to be the norm between siblings.  In reality, when one comes face to face with losing a sister, all the arguing, screaming, and fighting seem of little importance.  I realized this during a blistering hot July afternoon sojourn at the beach.  
The long drive felt like a never-ending adventure.  Instead of cool air, the air conditioner blew air from the gates of Hell.  My sister and I sat in the back seat of the ever-shrinking Toyota Camry arguing and hitting each other until dad threatened us yelling, “Don’t make me drive this car into a telephone pole!”  Mom sat on the other side with only two jobs, control the radio and navigate us to the beach.  Both were done very poorly, giving us static from the radio and forty-five minutes on a road with no name.  After hours of driving, which felt like an eternity, we finally arrived at the beach.  
Running toward the ocean, I felt the cool sand squish between my toes.  The water was clear and inviting, seashells cover the bottom, and rolling waves punctuate the surface.  My sister and I went into the ocean, diving through the waves and swimming as quickly as we could.  We rode enormous waves into the shore on our raft and then swam back to catch more.  We enjoyed ourselves for hours until I was totally exhausted and headed into shore.  My sister stayed by herself and floated on the raft.  
After I ate lunch with my parents, I wanted to go back and play in the ocean.  I walked to the edge of the water looking for my sister on that little red raft.   I looked to the left and the right, but she was nowhere to be seen.  I turned to my parents and yelled that I couldn’t find Molly!  At that moment, my mom became hysterical.  To see my mother behave dramatically is not unusual, but when I saw the fear in my father’s eyes, I started to panic.  My mom began sprinting up the beach, screaming for Molly and grabbing complete strangers begging for help.  My dad and I rushed in the opposite direction, with mounting fear that we might not ever see Molly again.  We felt empty and helpless.  Pretty soon it seemed like everyone at the beach was looking for the little blonde girl.  
After several minutes, we spotted Molly walking hand in hand, under the protective wing of a lifeguard, laughing and chatting.  I asked Molly what happened and where she was for those ten minutes, which felt like ten hours.  She replied by saying the ocean’s forceful current pulled me down the beach.  I just shook my head in relief and was very thankful she was back to wrestle in the waves with me again.
A life altering experience occurred on that horrific day at the beach.  In a day suddenly gone crazy, how could I keep from thinking what could have been?  The realization that I almost lost my sister brought us closer than we had ever been.  But most importantly, I learned to appreciate my family and not take them for granted.    
Words
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