Monroe Stahr


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monroe stahr Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon

Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon.  Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr.  He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore.  He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis.  Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife.  He would rather put his feet up with a cigar and shoot the breeze with the boys.  Yet once he laid eyes on Kathleen for the first time, all of that changed.  It was love at first sight.  
Kathleen and Stahr meet after an earthquake rocked Los Angles.  Stahr was surveying the damage done to the studio, when a prop came floating by with two "dames" clinging to it for their lives.  A stage hand rescued and presented them to Stahr for judgement.  That was the moment that would change everything.  The following excerpt is a narration of what was going through Stahr's mind when he was struck blind by Cupid's golden arrow.  
   "Smiling faintly at him from not four feet away was the face of his dead wife, identical even to the expression.  Across the four feet of moonlight, the eyes he knew looked back at him, a curl blew a little on a familiar forehead; the smile lingered, changed a little according to pattern; the lips parted--the same." (Chp II, p.26)      
She was Minna, but she wasn't.  All her features were Minna's, except her voice.  "--and then he heard another voice speak that was not Minna's voice."  (Chp II, p.26)  She was obviously British and not glamorous American, as Minna's had been.  Nevertheless, she was a replica of his life long love.  Stahr determined right then that she would be the next.  Before he could get himself together, Kathleen was whisked away by the police for trespassing.  Stahr spent the next few days trying to track her down.  By this time he had fully succumbed to her rapture.  On their third meeting, they happened to stumble upon each other at a posh Hollywood party.  Her beauty brought back all the sensations that had trapped him initially.  The scene was as follows:
   "...the white table lengthened and became an altar where the priestess sat alone.  Vitality welled up in him, and he could have stood a long time across the table from her, looking and smiling...(while dancing) she was momentarily unreal.  Usually a girl's skull made her real, but not this time--Stahr continued to be dazzled as they danced out along the floor...."  (Chp. V, p.73)
Stahr wanted desperately to have her as is own, but she was not to be had.  Unbeknownst to him she was engaged to be married.  She tried to tell him, but could not.  She too was in love.  The romance that followed was of a whirl wind pace that ended with a "Dear John" letter.  She could not bring herself to tell him in person.  Kathleen had fallen in love with Stahr although she resisted it by the fact she was already involved with another man.  His ideal was not to be realized.  His ideal goddess was the beginning of Stahr's downfall.   The simple fact that Stahr was unable to win Kathleen away from her fianc causes him to become extremely miserable.  In F. Scott Fitzgerald's own words: "Stahr is miserable and embittered toward the end."  (Author's Notes, p.149)  He continued to love her to the end, as he lost his life, he lost it lovelessly.  
All this fuss over a woman might seem a bit trivial, but in true love, nothing is trivial.  Monroe Stahr idealized Kathleen Moore as the true cure to all his ills and loveless nights.  To him, she was Minna Davis.  In being, but not spirit, she was a replica.  
This theme of idealism is similar to what Richard Slotkin reflects as "the American dream of perpetual self-improvement and transcendence."  (22)  Stahr idealized Kathleen as his way of perpetual self-improvement.  He believed that Kathleen was the ticket he was waiting for, the ticket to happiness and closure.  His life was a ... more

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writings of f scott fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald was a writer very much of his own time. This rare ability, along with his rhetorical brilliance, has established Fitzgerald as one of the major novelists and story writers of the twentieth century.
The source of Fitzgerald s talent remains a mystery. Edward Fitzgerald , his father, came from tired, old stock with roots in Maryland. Edward Fitzgerald s great-great-grandfather was the brother of Francis Scott Keys grandfather, and if Scott Fitzgerald claimed a closer relationship, it was hardly his fault. He had after all been christened Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald , and his mother Mollie was inordinately proud of the Key connection she had married into. Equally important, probably, was Fitzgerald s sense of having come from two widely different Celtic strains. Mollie Fitzgerald had lost two children to epidemics before her bright, handsome Scott came along. No beauty herself, she spoiled her son and loved to show him off. As a youth Fitzgerald revealed a flair for dramatics, first in Saint Paul where he wrote original plays for amateur production, and later at the Newman School in Hackensack, New Jersey, and at Princeton, where he composed lyrics for the universitys famous Triangle Club productions. For Fitzgerald , boy-girl relationships amounted to a kind of contest in which there could be only one winner. During the hectic party season in Saint Paul, Christmas of his sophomore year at Princeton, Fitzgerald more than met his match in the charming Ginevra King of Chicago, Lake Forest, and the great world of wealth and family background. They dated a few times and conducted a long and heated correspondence, but in the end, almost inevitably, Fitzgerald lost her. There is a legend that Ginevras father told Scott that poor boys shouldnt think of marrying rich girls. Whether he said it or not, Fitzgerald intuited such a message and tried to work off some of his disappointment in a number of his most powerful stories, beginning with The Debutante, published in the Nassau Lit in January 1917 and later included in This Side of Paradise (1920).
By the time that famous first novel appeared in 1920, Fitzgerald was engaged to marry yet another enchanting girl, Zelda Sayre of Montgomery, Alabama, the daughter of a judge and by all accounts a belle of shockingly unconventional behavior. It was characteristic of Fitzgerald , who was one of the most autobiographical of writers, to transform his own experience into fiction. Later he was to appropriate Zeldas life in all its tragic dimensions for use in his stories and novels. At Newman Fitzgerald had encountered Father Cyril Sigourney Webster Fay, a worldly Catholic convert who delighted the boy by recognizing his potential and treating him like an adult. For a time Fitzgerald s Catholic roots threatened to emerge. At Princeton he had met John Peale Bishop, a young literary man who headed the Nassau Lit, Princetons literary magazine, and became, along with Edmund Wilson, a friend for the long haul. Always the emphasis stays on Amory, however. With people and events alike, as Andrew Turnbull observed, Fitzgerald adhered to the Renaissance and Romantic conception of the writer as a man of action who experiences his material at first handnot from lack of imagination, but so he can write about it more intensely.
This Side of Paradise became popular in large part because it portrayed the habits and customs of the young postwar generation. For his part, Amory Blaine is a remarkably tame and impeccably moral young man who flies from the arms of a seductive chorus girl as if she were an agent of the devil. Amory seeks to win the golden girl and to achieve recognition as a leader at Princeton. Like Fitzgerald , Amory Blaine throws himself into the work of the Triangle Club (and, in Amorys case, the Daily Princetonian ). Like Fitzgerald , Amory spends too much time and energy analyzing the social system at Princeton as a kind of glamorous country club (this aspect of the book outraged some sons of Nassau and drew a letter of objection from Princetons president). At the end of This Side of Paradise, Amory Blaine has presumably matured. In form This ... more

monroe stahr

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  • M: The Last Tycoon M: The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. H...
  • O: Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgeralds O: Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgeralds Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather put his feet up w...
  • N: Writings of f scott fitzgerald N: Writings of f scott fitzgerald writings of f scott fitzgerald F. Scott Fitzgerald was a writer very much of his own time. This rare ability, along with his rhetorical brilliance, has established Fitzgerald as one of the major novelists and story writers of the twentieth century. The source of Fitzgerald s talent remains a mystery. Edward Fitzgerald , his father, came from tired, old stock with roots in Maryland. Edward Fitzgerald s great-great-grandfather was the brother of Francis Scott Keys grandfather, and if Scott Fitz...
  • R: The Last Tycoon R: The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather p...
  • O: The Last Tycoon O: The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald\'s The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald\'s The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather...
  • E: The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scot E: The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scot The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scott Fitzgerald over a period of two years. Fitzgerald original name for the book was Stahr / A Romance. This was changed when Fitzgerald's Hollywood companion, Sheilah Graham, sent his work in progress to Maxwell Perkins, Fitzgerald's editor. Sheilah claimed that three weeks before Fitzgerald died, he said -- What do you think of this title? The Love of the Last Tycoon. At first, Sheilah wasn't sure what to think of the title. Fitzgerald submit...
  •  : The Last Tycoon : The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. H...
  • S: Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgeralds S: Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgeralds Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather put his feet up w...
  • T: Writings of f scott fitzgerald T: Writings of f scott fitzgerald writings of f scott fitzgerald F. Scott Fitzgerald was a writer very much of his own time. This rare ability, along with his rhetorical brilliance, has established Fitzgerald as one of the major novelists and story writers of the twentieth century. The source of Fitzgerald s talent remains a mystery. Edward Fitzgerald , his father, came from tired, old stock with roots in Maryland. Edward Fitzgerald s great-great-grandfather was the brother of Francis Scott Keys grandfather, and if Scott Fitz...
  • A: The Last Tycoon A: The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather p...
  • H: The Last Tycoon H: The Last Tycoon The Last Tycoon Infatuating Idealism in F. Scott Fitzgerald\'s The Last Tycoon Idealism Is undoubtably present in F. Scott Fitzgerald\'s The Last Tycoon. Infatuation may be a better word, for that was exactly what possessed the main character, Monroe Stahr. He was totally engorged with one Kathleen Moore. He idealized Miss Moore as the second coming of his deceased wife Minna Davis. Stahr was a true man of men that had little to do with women since the tragic passing of his wife. He would rather...
  • R: The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scot R: The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scot The Love of the Last Tycoon was written by F. Scott Fitzgerald over a period of two years. Fitzgerald original name for the book was Stahr / A Romance. This was changed when Fitzgerald's Hollywood companion, Sheilah Graham, sent his work in progress to Maxwell Perkins, Fitzgerald's editor. Sheilah claimed that three weeks before Fitzgerald died, he said -- What do you think of this title? The Love of the Last Tycoon. At first, Sheilah wasn't sure what to think of the title. Fitzgerald submit...