Light And The Dark


Find More Light And The Dark

Looking for essays on light and the dark? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

light and the dark Measure For Measure
Measure for Measure, the last of Shakespeare's great comedies, is also the darkest of his comedies, and represents his transition to tragic plays. This play differs from Shakespeare's other comedies, and is in many ways more akin to tragedy than to comedy. In setting, plot, and character development Measure for Measure has a tragic tone, however, because none of the main characters actually loses his life, the play is a comedy.
Almost all of Shakespeare's comedies have dual localities: the real world of crime, punishment, and responsibility, and an idyllic world, where reality is malleable, and forgiving. For example, As You Like It occurs in both the world of the court, dangerous for almost all of the primary characters, and the forest of Arden, a sanctuary that nurses conflict to resolution. Measure for Measure, on the other hand, offers no safe haven for the characters. They are trapped in the corrupted mire called Venice. Angelo, appointed scourge of the city, lets no person escape his punishing hand. Painting no "Arden" to provide asylum, Shakespeare gives Measure for Measure a grave tone. The play is more like a tragedy: intense focus on the gravity of the situation with little emotional respite for the reader and characters. Measure for Measure is like a tragedy in plot development, as well. Shakespeare's earlier comedies pose situations of extreme danger, but through plot development, Shakespeare handles the conflict with a lighter tone. Much is at stake, but he reassures the reader that good will prosper, and evil will not escape some sort of punishment. Measure for Measure is dangerously close to being a tragedy throughout the whole play.
Claudio's death seems imminent; Isabella will lose either her brother by preserving her chastity, or lose her future as a nun by sacrificing her virginity to the misnamed Angelo; and Angelo, whose hyper-moral reign of terror has no sway over his own actions, nearly perverts the entire plot to his own lust. He nearly succeeds, and it appears as if he will escape punishment entirely. Only in the last scene does Shakespeare provide resolution.
The entire play bears a tragic weight that Shakespeare lifts only in the final moments. This resolution, however, adds only a nominal comedic feel to the play. The onset of the final scene drastically alters the plot, which seemed as if it would offer no justice; such a "happy" ending clashes with the previous events. The duke, sometimes-sinister mastermind of the plot, forces the final judgment on the characters, and offers little real relief. For example, the duke demands that Isabella, who seemed set on a chaste life as a nun, marry him. The plot has thrown her from one precarious situation to another, and finally she is left with no real option, but to marry the duke. Shakespeare provides no evidence that Isabella wants this, nor does he allow her any real escape from the duke's demand. In essence, she is in the same position with the duke as she was with Angelo. The duke, cruelly pretends that Claudio, Isabella's beloved brother is dead; he pretends to side with Angelo, thereby exacerbating the mental anguish of Mariana and Isabella; he bolsters Angelos confidence that he will escape punishment. Even through the end, the duke acts as a type of watered down Iago, playing on insecurities, and perverting the truth for his own controlling nature. This play hinges between tragedy and comedy. It eventually falls on the side of comedy when the duke reveals that no one shall die.
Finally, Measure for Measure balances between tragedy and comedy in the way the characters react to the twists of the plot. As Anne Barton displays in an introduction to the play, the characters of Merchant of Venice are "absolutists". Unlike those in typical Shakespearean comedies, the characters in this dark comedy rigidly defend their beliefs. Angelo never discards his views of premarital sex, even though he demands that Isabella sleep with him. He is determined to root out sexual license in Vienna, and his own transgression cannot dissuade him. Isabella also is more like Shakespeare's tragic characters than his typical comedic characters. Her protection of her virginity never wavers; not even when her brother's life is ... more

light and the dark

Research on Light And The Dark

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Light And The Dark" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Light And The Dark essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Light And The Dark and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Light And The Dark

Find essay on Light And The Dark

Heart Of Darkness

In Joseph Conrad's

book Heart of Darkness the Europeans are cut off from

civilization, overtaken by greed, exploitation, and material

interests from his own kind. Conrad develops themes of

personal power, individual responsibility, and social justice.

His book has all the trappings of the conventional adventure

tale - mystery, exotic setting, escape, suspense, unexpected

attack. The book is a record of things seen and done by

Conrad while in the Belgian Congo. Conrad uses Marlow,

the main character in the book, as a narrator so he himself

can enter the story and tell it out of his own philosophical

mind. Conrad's voyages to the Atlantic and Pacific, and the

coasts of Seas of the East brought contrasts of novelty and

exotic discovery. By the time Conrad took his harrowing

journey into the Congo in 1890, reality had become

unconditional. The African venture figured as his descent into

hell. He returned ravaged by the illness and mental disruption

which undermined his health for the remaining years of his

life. Marlow's journey into the Congo, like Conrad's

journey, was also meaningful. Marlow experienced the

violent threat of nature, the insensibility of reality, and the

moral darkness. We have noticed that important motives in

Heart of Darkness connect the white men with the Africans.

Conrad knew that the white men who come to Africa

professing to bring progress and light to "darkest Africa"

have themselves been deprived of the sanctions of their

European social orders; they also have been alienated from

the old tribal ways. "Thrown upon their own inner spiritual

resources they may be utterly damned by their greed, their

sloth, and their hypocrisy into moral insignificance, as were

the pilgrims, or they may be so corrupt by their absolute

power over the Africans that some Marlow will need to lay

their memory among the 'dead Cats of Civilization.'"

(Conrad 105.) The supposed purpose of the Europeans

traveling into Africa was to civilize the natives. Instead they

colonized on the native's land and corrupted the natives.

"Africans bound with thongs that contracted in the rain and

cut to the bone, had their swollen hands beaten with rifle

butts until they fell off. Chained slaves were forced to drink

the white man's defecation, hands and feet were chopped off

for their rings, men were lined up behind each other and shot

with one cartridge , wounded prisoners were eaten by

maggots till they die and were then thrown to starving dogs

or devoured by cannibal tribes." (Meyers 100.) Conrad's

"Diary" substantiated the accuracy of the conditions

described in Heart of Darkness: the chain gangs, the grove

of death, the payment in brass rods, the cannibalism and the

human skulls on the fence posts. Conrad did not exaggerate

or invent the horrors that provided the political and

humanitarian basis for his attack on colonialism. The

Europeans took the natives' land away from them by force.

They burned their towns, stole their property, and enslaved

them. George Washington Williams stated in his diary, "Mr.

Stanley was supposed to have made treaties with more than

four hundred native Kings and Chiefs, by which they

surrendered their rights to the soil. And yet many of these

people declare that they never made a treaty with Stanley,

or any other white man; their lands have been taken away

from them by force, and they suffer the greatest wrongs at

the hands of the Belgians." (Conrad 87.) Conrad saw

intense greed in the Congo. The Europeans back home saw

otherwise; they perceived that the tons of ivory and rubber

being brought back home was a sign of orderly conduct in

the Congo. Conrad's Heart of Darkness mentioned nothing

about the trading of rubber. Conrad and Marlow did not

care for ivory; they cared about the exploration into the

"darkest Africa." A painting of a blindfolded woman carrying

a lighted torch was discussed in the book. The background

was dark, and the effect of the torch light on her face was

sinister. The oil painting represents the blind and stupid ivory

company, fraudulently letting people believe that besides the

ivory they were taking out of the jungle, they were, at the

same time, bringing light and progress to the jungle. Conrad

mentioned in his diary that missions were set up to

Christianize the natives. He did not include the missions into

his book because the land was forcibly taken away from the

natives, thus bringing in a church does not help if the natives

have no will. Supplies brought in the country were left

outdoors and abandoned, and a brick maker who made no

bricks, lights up the fact that the Europeans do not care to

help the natives ... more

light and the dark

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • L: Hedda Gabler L: Hedda Gabler Hedda Gabler Throughout Hedda Gabler my perception of Hedda was influenced by many of the theatre languages. From the costumes she wore, the props she used, and the lighting that illuminated the stage, all of the languages had an enormous effect on my perception of Hedda. The first language that influenced my perception of her character was her costumes. The theatre language that caught my eye first was the use of Heddas costumes. As the play began she was wearing a bright elegant gown; without...
  • I: Measure For Measure I: Measure For Measure Measure For Measure Measure for Measure, the last of Shakespeare\'s great comedies, is also the darkest of his comedies, and represents his transition to tragic plays. This play differs from Shakespeare\'s other comedies, and is in many ways more akin to tragedy than to comedy. In setting, plot, and character development Measure for Measure has a tragic tone, however, because none of the main characters actually loses his life, the play is a comedy. Almost all of Shakespeare\'s comedies have dua...
  • G: Heart Of Darkness G: Heart Of Darkness Heart Of Darkness In Joseph Conrad\'s book Heart of Darkness the Europeans are cut off from civilization, overtaken by greed, exploitation, and material interests from his own kind. Conrad develops themes of personal power, individual responsibility, and social justice. His book has all the trappings of the conventional adventure tale - mystery, exotic setting, escape, suspense, unexpected attack. The book is a record of things seen and done by Conrad while in the Belgian Congo. Conrad uses Marl...
  • H: Neil Simons Barefoot in the Park H: Neil Simons Barefoot in the Park Neil Simon's 'Barefoot in the Park' It can be argued that Neil Simon is not only America's most successful playwright, but also the most successful playwright in the history of theatre.1 Despite being criticized for lack of substance, his hugely successful comedies are consistently revived, whether on Broadway or in other community or dinner theatres. Last week the University of Notre Dame's Mainstage season opened with the departmental premiere of Barefoot in the Park. Though the play origina...
  • T: HEart Of Darkness T: HEart Of Darkness HEart Of Darkness Heart of Darkness In Heart of Darkness it is the white invaders for instance, who are, almost without exception, embodiments of blindness, selfishness, and cruelty; and even in the cognitive domain, where such positive phrases as to enlighten, for instance, are conventionally opposed to negative ones such as to be in the dark, the traditional expectations are reversed. In Kurtz's painting, as we have seen, the effect of the torch light on the face was sinister (Watt 332). Ian W...
  •  : The Canada Goose : The Canada Goose The Canada Goose The Canada Goose The Branta Canadensis, better known as the Canada Goose is a magnificent bird which can be found all over North America. People from all over North America look towards the sky when the Canada Geese go honking overhead in their trademark V formation, and because they nest all over Canada and some of the United States many people have a chance to witness the birds migration to the nesting grounds and back to the wintering grounds. The Canada Goose is respected by...
  • A: None Provided1 A: None Provided1 None Provided1 When we discuss our brain, we usually focus on the brains ability to think. That task alone is extremely complex and involved, but the brain also has many other tasks. Most of the time the brain is on autopilot, meaning that most of the activities preformed are just automatic. Our five senses; sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell, are automatically preformed in our brains. We don\'t have to think about how something sounds, we just hear it and we then interpret that sound. The la...
  • N: Black Vs White N: Black Vs White Black Vs White How can a writer have a character make the reader feel warm inside when reading about them, or feel anger and disgust towards the character? A way is the use of light and dark imagery. Imagery is a very important aspect of writing used to portray a situation or character as more real or to display their personality. Charles Dickens uses imagery in his book Oliver Twist to display his characters as good, light or bad, dark. This type of imagery makes the reader feel more comfortabl...
  • D: History of Rock and Roll D: History of Rock and Roll History of Rock and Roll A History Paper-Rock n Roll Many people and many styles of music influenced Rock and Roll. The styles included Blues, Jazz, Gospel, Bluegrass, Boogie-Woogie, and Rockabilly. Each was a major factor into the introduction of a new style of music called Rock N Roll. Popular music places a premium on accessibility, represents various meanings to boost both instant appeal and memorability - distinctive tunes, novel instrumental flourishes, danceable rhythms, repea...
  •  : Smile Come On Its Free : Smile Come On Its Free Smile Come On Its Free Smile...Come on...Its Free !!! A SMILE costs nothing, but gives much. It enriches those who receive, without making poorer those who give. It takes but a moment, but the memory of it sometimes lasts forever. None is so rich or mighty that he can get along without it, and none is so poor but that he can be made rich by it. A smile creates happiness in the home, fosters good will in business, and is the countersign of friendship. It brings rest to the weary, cheer to the d...
  • T: Leslie Konen T: Leslie Konen Leslie Konen Engl. 4313 Religions of Mama Day A conflict facing many black Americans is the loss of African roots and legacy in the present civilization that does not support cultural identity but chokes it instead. Gloria Naylor's novel Mama Day brings the all-black population of the island of Willow Springs far closer to Africa than the black folks of mainland America could ever be. Geographically, Willow Springs is set apart from the United States, alienated from the South Carolina/Georgia ...
  • H: History of Philippine Cinema H: History of Philippine Cinema History of Philippine Cinema REEL TO REAL: THE HISTORY OF PHILIPPINE FILMS Introduction The youngest of the Philippine arts, film has evolved to become the most popular of all the art forms. Introduced only in 1897, films have ranged from silent movies to talkies; black and white to color. Outpacing its predecessors by gaining public acceptance, from one end of the country to the other, its viewers come from all walks of life. Nationwide, there are more than 1000 movie theaters. Early in the 198...
  • E: After the End of Art E: After the End of Art After the End of Art Art and Craft of Writing ...the master narrative of the history of art - in the West but by the end not in the West alone - is that there is an era of imitation, followed by an era of ideology, followed by our post-historical era in which, with qualification, anything goes. Arthur Danto, After the End of Art Theres no general agreement on what art is and what is not. As Danto argues in his book After the End of Art nowadays you can no longer tell whether something is ar...
  •  : Akhenaten : Akhenaten Akhenaten Akhenaten is know as one of the greatest mystical revolutionaries of all time, but was his new religion a product of his creative genius, or merely a reaction to threats within his own empire. As Pharaoh, Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti, changed the traditional polytheistic religion to a monotheistic one centered on the Aten (the sun disk). He moved the Egyptian capitol from Thebes to a site now know as el-Amarna. After Akhenatens death, his successors re established the old order of...
  • D: Old Man And The Sea D: Old Man And The Sea Old Man And The Sea In the book, The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway tells a story of an old fisherman. The old man, named Santiago, had gone for eighty-four days without catching a fish. Santiago feels that the following day would be a good day because eighty-five is his lucky number. The following day he gets up before dawn and sets out for a day of fishing. He had set one bait at forty fathoms, the second at seventy-five fathoms, and the third and forth were at one hundred and one hundr...
  • A: Measure For Measure A: Measure For Measure Measure For Measure Measure for Measure, the last of Shakespeare\'s great comedies, is also the darkest of his comedies, and represents his transition to tragic plays. This play differs from Shakespeare\'s other comedies, and is in many ways more akin to tragedy than to comedy. In setting, plot, and character development Measure for Measure has a tragic tone, however, because none of the main characters actually loses his life, the play is a comedy. Almost all of Shakespeare\'s comedies have dua...
  • R: Plagues and Diseases R: Plagues and Diseases Plagues and Diseases Plagues and Diseases Plague. A word that has struck fear in the hearts of man since the earliest of times. It has also lead to some of the greatest historical events and stories of our time. The ancient cities of Rome and Athens, in their downfall, were finished off by pestilence. The Bubonic Plague, also known as The Black Death, devastated Europe in the 14th century, starting a new age. The great warrior Ivan the Terrible was stricken with disease, and driven mad. During t...
  • K: Fools in shakespeare Puck K: Fools in shakespeare Puck fools in shakespeare Puck Shakespeare is a master of the telling of stories. When we observe his works, we see the struggle of the main characters with themselves and others. Many a time there is lack of reason as the protagonists fight the demons, which keep them from their goal, but the beauty of Shakespeare is that reason is usually portrayed in the form of a fool. When we think of fools, we think of those with little capacity of understanding, but in Shakespeare, fools are usually mediators,...
  • Fredrick Douglas Fredrick Douglas Fredrick Douglas The Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass In reading The Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, I, like others, found myself to be deeply moved. The way in which Mr. Douglass walked me through each stage of his career as a slave gave me a better understanding of the African American slaves struggle. I realized in reading this mans story that he was a gifted individual and I pondered over where his strength came from? It is true and obvious that Mr. Frederick...
  • JBreligion JBreligion JBreligion At the end of Baldwin\'s 1952 novel Go Tell It on the Mountain, John Grimes, the young protagonist, has an epiphany or what is more commonly referred to as a visionary conversion experience, a staple of American religious life. He embraces Jesus and endures a state of ecstatic mysticism in which he experiences his drifting soul ... anchored in the love of God (204). John\'s rebirth in Christ, his being saved, is an affirmation of one of the strongest bulwarks in the African Americ...
  • Chaucer Chaucer chaucer The Troubles With Seamus Heaney The poet Keats wrote that the only means of strengthening one\'s intellect is to make up one\'s own mind about nothing - to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thought, not a select body. That this may be an admirable aim for a poet, and especially so for one writing against a background of ethnic violence, is not in doubt. It is, however, extremely difficult to remain neutral when one identifies oneself with an ethnic party involved in conflict. It i...
  • The Work Of Poet And Philosoher Archibald Lampman The Work Of Poet And Philosoher Archibald Lampman The Work Of Poet And Philosoher Archibald Lampman The Work of Poet and Philosoher Archibald Lampman Poet and philosopher Archibald Lampman (1861-1899) led not a life of his own, but an existance forced upon him by peers and an unfeeling and cold society. Dying far before his time, Lampman led a life of misery. He was supported only by a few close friends and his immortal poetry. This essay is founded around one particular of his works but I feel it necessary to discuss the conditions in which he...
  • PHYSICAN ASSISTED SUICIED PHYSICAN ASSISTED SUICIED PHYSICAN ASSISTED SUICIED Death in the Hands of Whom Should an individual be allowed to choose assisted suicide with the help of a physician, or be forced to follow their theological beliefs of the dominant religion they practice when life seems pointless? The choice of whether to live or not live is directly influenced by the decision to indulge in a process characterized as physician assisted suicide or simply called Euthanasia. Many people believe it is solely left upon God to determine whe...
  • D-Day D-Day D-Day D-Day D-Day is the most well-known, gruesome day in the history of WWII. Out of the five landings, the landing on Omaha Beach was, by far, the worst for the U.S. and The Allies. Paratroopers who had landed the night before came up behind the Germans and aided the U.S. and The Allies. Eventually they pushed through and invaded Hitlers Europe. Even though D-Day was considered a massacre, the invasion aided the USs ultimate victory. D-Day happened on June 6, 1944. It was one of the dark...
  • Othello - Compared To Twelfth Night Othello - Compared To Twelfth Night Othello - Compared To Twelfth Night Othello - Compared to Twelfth Night She loved me for the dangers I had pass'd, and I loved her that she did pity them (Othello, I.iii 166-167). William Shakespeares tragedy Othello, is pervaded by a dominant theme, one of love. Othello, the Moor of Venice falls madly in love with a woman named Desdemona. They marry and are very happy together. Othello and Desdemona face many trials during the course of their nine-month marriage. The most notable one occurs ...