Irony in Macbeth


Find More Irony in Macbeth

The situation surrounding Duncan's death, Lady Macbeth's guilt, and Macbeth's insanity are all examples of dramatic irony because we have witnessed Macbeth and Lady Macbeth plan out and commit the act of murder. See how other students write essays about irony in Macbeth.

Irony in Macbeth

Irony in Macbeth



Written as coursework for Grade 9 English course.
In Shakespeare’s Macbeth there was a lot of irony, and Shakespeare intended the irony of the play to build and maintain suspense, while creating a vague sense of fear.

For example, the irony in the play started out early, with the witches’ prophecies to Macbeth and Banquo. The prophecies to Macbeth were all ironic paradoxes. In Act I, Scene iii, the witches told Macbeth, “All hail, Macbeth! that shalt be king hereafter.” This prophecy was ironic because even though it was true, it did not turn out how Macbeth expected it to. Macbeth probably thought that being the king would be great. He would be rich, everyone would respect him, he’d have all the power in Scotland, and he thought that that would make him happy. Of course, since the witches’ prophecies were cleverly designed to manipulate his weak mind, Macbeth murdered Duncan to satisfy his ambition. In Act III, Scene ii, Lady Macbeth and Macbeth were discussing their feelings about being king and queen of Scotland after the murder. Said Lady Macbeth, “Nought’s had, all’s spent. Where our desire is got without content: ’Tis safer to be that which we destroy than, by destruction, dwell in doubtful joy.” In Act III, Scene i Macbeth said of the witches and the murder, “For them the gracious Duncan have I murdered; put rancours in the vessel of my peace only for them; and mine eternal jewel given to the common enemy of man.” In those sentences, we can see the irony in the witches’ prophecies. The implied meaning of the witches’ prophecies was that Macbeth would be king. Macbeth took this to mean that he would be a happy king, and so dreams of him on the throne appeared. He thought that becoming king would be easy, he just had to get Duncan out of the way. Everything turned out as Macbeth had imagined, except that he was not happy as the king. The guilt from Duncan’s murder, not to mention that of Banquo’s, made being the king a horrible experience for Macbeth, all because of the witches. This irony would make the audience mistrust the witches in the back of their minds, and therefore also put a vague fear over the whole play, because of the realisation of the witches’ relentless sinister determination to disrupt peace and order in Scotland.

Another excellent example of irony in the play starts in Act II, Scene ii, shortly after the murder of Duncan. Macbeth had just committed the malicious act to satisfy his unchecked ambition, and he was quite shocked. In his words, “Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand?” The emotional effects of the murder hadn’t quite gotten through to Lady Macbeth yet, and so she nonchalantly replied, “A little water clears us of this deed.” Eventually though, Lady Macbeth’s conscience affected her mind adversely, giving her a deep emotional disturbance. In Act V, Scene i, Lady Macbeth had a fear of the dark and she had started sleep walking and talking to herself. As she was wandering the castle one night, she was obsessed with trying to wash the blood that she still felt and smelt from her hands, a huge change from Act II, Scene ii. She said, “Out, damned stop! out I say!” and continued with, “What, will these hands ne’er be clean?” This is definitely very ironic, since early in the play Lady Macbeth dismissed Macbeth’s concerns with little thought, and one would expect her not to ever think of them again. As we can see in the play though, what was once a trifle to Lady Macbeth soon became a major issue when the realisation of what she had done in Duncan’s murder finally set in. As far as the audience is concerned, they would probably be shocked after the murder of Duncan, and find Lady Macbeth’s responses to Macbeth’s hysteria discomforting, thinking that Lady Macbeth must be a very evil person indeed. Later on though, when Lady Macbeth broke down mentally, the audience would feel a bit more of a vague sense of fear when they were reminded by Lady Macbeth of how terrible Duncan’s murder really was. She was very composed at first, but soon she realised that she had done something horrendous and because of that realisation she died soon afterward.

Another prime example of the play’s irony can be found in Act I, Scene vii, shortly before Duncan’s murder. The irony in this scene is called dramatic irony, meaning that the audience is aware of what is about to happen but the actors are not. For example, before this scene the audience has heard Macbeth’s soliloquies about murdering the king, and has been exposed to the mood-setting opening scenes. By now the audience would probably be on the edge of their seats, waiting for Macbeth to slip a dagger out of his pocket and run towards Duncan. To the part of the audience that would be expecting this, the next scene would be much different than they would have imagined. Act I, Scene vii is set outside of Macbeth’s castle, in broad daylight (unlike most of the scenes in the play). When Duncan arrives, he comments, “This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air nimbly and sweetly recommends itself unto our gentle senses.” Banquo is quick to agree, and he comments on the nice birds in the sky. Lady Macbeth, on the other hand, has taken to graciously welcoming the guests. The scene ends with Duncan taking Lady Macbeth’s hand, and allowing her to lead him into the castle of death to his murderer. This scene is a prime example of irony because its real meaning is much different that it appears. Looking at the scene alone, one would conclude that Duncan and the Macbeths are good friends, and this is just another pleasant visit. In its context though, this scene is the beginning of Macbeth’s murder spree, and so the sunlight, birds, and nice weather make the scene all the more ironic. Apart from giving the audience a sense of brooding violence and veiled threats, this scene would also built a lot of suspense. When people saw Duncan walk into the palace, many would (rightly) suspect that he was walking obliviously to his doom. In short, this scene’s dramatic irony was a key factor in moulding the play’s suspense.

Another excellent example of irony occurs in Act IV, Scene ii shortly before the Macduffs are murdered. In the scene Lady Macduff was angry at her husband for fleeing to England, leaving her defenceless. Her son is talking to her, telling her how he’ll live without his father. He says that he’ll live like birds do, meaning living with what they get. The implied meaning in the beginning of this scene is that Lady Macbeth’s son will do just what he said he would, he’ll live with what he’ll get, and keep on living. His words are a paradox though, since the literal meaning of his words is much different than the implied meaning. Once he finishes his speech, some of Macbeth’s hit men run in and stab him. The literal meaning of what he said, that he’d live “with what [he’d] get” is so much different than his implied meaning because he definitely got what he got, but he definitely didn’t keep on living. The irony of this would reinforce what Macbeth was saying at the time, that life is pointless, and would help to add to the malicious atmosphere of the play by making the audience feel as if what they did in life didn’t really matter.

In conclusion, Macbeth is full of irony. The irony in Macbeth is there to add to the suspense and the malicious mood of the play. Without the irony in Macbeth, the play would have been much different. For example, if Duncan’s visit to the castle took place at night, in the middle of a thunderstorm, with the Macbeths being hostile to him and the witches egging Macbeth on, the play would have lacked a good deal of suspense, and the audience might begin to get bored of the play, since it would not change much and it would be easy to predict what would happen. If the witches hadn’t made their paradoxical prophecies to Macbeth, the play would be missing a lot of irony and the audience wouldn’t get much fear from watching the play, since they would just reason that Macbeth was insane to begin with. In short, the play, Macbeth wouldn’t have been such an interesting, suspenseful, or terrifying play without irony. Clearly, Shakespeare intended the irony of the play to build and maintain suspense, while creating a vague sense of fear.

Irony in Macbeth

Irony in Macbeth

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Irony in Macbeth" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Irony in Macbeth essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Irony in Macbeth and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.

Start a New Essay on Irony in Macbeth

Macbeth, a Play for our Time



Such is the genius and so great is the scope of Shakespeare’s writings that there can be little doubt that a common perception is one of an imaginative mind concocting stories. In fact Shakespeare had many sources and much of his work was based on historical fact. Holinshed chronicled in the sixteenth century, the histories of England, Scotland and Ireland, and it is from the “Historie of Scotland” that Shakespeare built significant parts of this drama.

For example, the murder of King Duff and the insomnia born of guilt over the murder of a nephew suffered by King Kenneth are a matter of historical record. Each is clearly incorporated into the drama and so is the way in which King Kenneth was influenced by his wife to sponsor the murder. The historical record contains the belief of Macbeth in the prophecies of three wild women soothsayers who reinforced his ambitions for the throne; records Banquho’s (sic) role, the subsequent murder of King Duncan and Macbeth’s paranoia concerning MacDuff. ic)
The play Macbeth, first published in 1623, wove these separate histories into a coherent whole. No doubt Shakespeare pleaded poetic license. The result is timeless. Macbeth, is a story of a man who’s ambitions have brought him to commit treason and murder. Visions of power grew within his head until his thirst for power causes him to lose that very source of his ambition to the blade of Macduff’s sword. It is the ironic and symbolic elements such as this in the play which contribute to much of the acceptance the work has enjoyed for centuries.

Three forms of irony may be found in the play, Macbeth: Dramatic irony, being the difference between what the audience knows and what a character knows to be true; Verbal Irony, being a difference between what is said and what is meant; and Situational Irony, a difference between what happens and what is expected to happen. I will attempt to show examples of each of these forms of irony and explain their relevance to the characters and the plot. There are many examples of dramatic irony in the play which we might discuss.
A major example is where Lennox asks Macbeth whether the king is to leave Macbeth’s castle for home, Lennox: “Goes the king hence today? ” Macbeth: “He does: he did appoint so. ” (II,iii,54-54) Obviously Macbeth is lying through his teeth, for the audience was fully aware that he planned to murder King Duncan that night. But if one takes Macbeth’s reply literally, Duncan did “plan” to leave the castle the next day; there is no lie to be found in that.

One can look back on the porter’s hidden truths at the beginning of the scene, Porter: “Knock, knock! Who’s there, i’ the other devil’s name! Faith, here’s an equivocator, that could swear in both the scales against either scale; who committed treason enough for God’s sake, yet could not equivocate to heaven: O! come in, equivocator. ” (II,iii,7-11) Macbeth is playing the part of the equivocator again; equivocation being a form of double talk in which a remark is considered true if it could be argued as true from one viewpoint. One of my favorite examples of dramatic irony is the porter scene in Act II,iii because of the hidden truths the stuporous drunk revealed.
The porter acts the part of the porter at hell-gate in line 2, Porter: “If a man were porter of hell-gate, he should have old turning the key. ” and continues to dramatize through line 17, Porter: “But this place is too cold for hell. I’ll devil-porter it no further… ” After the king’s murder is discovered, it is almost comedic the way Lady Macbeth responds to the announcement of King Duncan’s murder. First she enters in mock confusion questioning, Lady Macbeth: “What’s the business, That such a hideous trumpet calls to parley

The sleepers of the house? speak, speak! ” (II,iii,84-86) One can imagine the actor portraying Lady Macbeth embellishing her performance almost to be point at which it might be called over-acting. Then with Macduff’s reply refusing to tell her what has happened for “The repetition in a woman’s ear Would murder as it fell,” one can not help but ignore the serious tone of the scene to laugh at the irony of his choice of words. The lady then plays her innocence more by replying in alarm to Macduff’s telling Banquo of the murder,
Lady Macbeth: “Woe, alas! What in our house? ” (II,iii,92) Possibly the most enjoyed form of irony in the play is verbal. For example, the exit of Macbeth at his final visit to the weird sisters where the first witch wryly comments on Macbeth’s forgetting to thank them with, First Witch: “That this great king may kindly say Our duties did his welcome pay. ” (IV,i,132) Another example in the speech in which Lennox ponders the strange evens which have unfolded since the banquet, Lennox: “And the right-valiant Banquo walk’d too late;

Whom, you may say, if ‘t please you, Fleance kill’d For Fleance fled… ” (III,vi,5) The irony in this line is perfectly completed by the inclusion of an almost humourous example of alliteration at it’s end. The work is filled with many examples of situational irony, such as the mysterious appearance of a third murderer in Act III, Scene III. It seems a strange chance that such a mysterious element happens in the third scene of the third act when one considers the symbolic meaning of the number “three” to the play.
I will discuss the significance of this number later. However the best example of situational irony in Macbeth is without doubt the way in which the strange sisters’ prophecies unfold. Macbeth was given the illusion of being immortal when he was told by the second apparition that he would “no man of woman born” shall harm him (IV,i,80). This illusion was amplified with the third apparition’s promise: Third Apparition: “Macbeth shall never be vanquish’d be until Great Birham Wood to high Dunsinane Hill Shall come against him. ” (IV,i,92)

Shakespeare has, in this case, not only surprised the characters with the outcome of these prophecies, but also the audience, the difference being that Macbeth believed he was to be victorious but the audience knew his failure to be inevitable – they just did not know how it was to come about. The cumulative irony is that of the weird sisters telling the inquirer exactly what he wished to hear. All his ambitions are reinforced by this universal trick of soothsayers which strongly predisposes the hearer towards total belief. That this belief leads to the sense of invulnerability which in fact makes him vulnerable, is the ultimate irony.
Shakespeare used clothing both symbolically and as a vehicle of character definition. Clothes were often used in Macbeth’s case to symbolize his titles. Symbolic clothing is identified when Ross tells Macbeth of his new title Thane of Cawdor when Macbeth does not know of the Thane’s treason, Macbeth: “The Thane of Cawdor lives: why do you dress me in Borrow’d robes? ” (I, III,108) Symbols using clothing such as borrowed robes, disguises and cross-dressing are found in several plays where they betray a range of situations from sheer mischievousness to dark, treasonable or murderous plots.

The symbol appears again when Banquo and Macbeth are discussing whether the witches’ prophecy about Macbeth becoming king will come true as well, “New honours come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mold But with the aid of use. (I,III,144)” Later, when Macbeth shares the news of his promotion with Lady Macbeth, he speaks with a clothing metaphor again, “Golden opinions from all sorts of people, Which would be worn now in their newest gloss, Not case aside so soon.
I,vii,33-34)” Again it is mentioned in (V,ii,21) by Angus, “Nothing in love; now does he feel his title Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe Upon a dwarfish thief. ” Blood as a symbol in the play assumes many different meanings as the story progresses, ranging from virtuous honour to the guilt of murder. The first reference to blood occurs in (I,ii,1) when Duncan meets the bleeding sergeant and remarks, “What bloody man is that? ” The man is bleeding after having fought to protect the noble Malcolm, which makes the blood a symbol of honour.

Blood symbolizes another virtuous trait when it appears again in the sergeant’s description of Macbeth’s victorious fight with Macdonwald, “Disdaining fortune, with his brandish’d steel, Which smok’d with bloody execution. (I,ii,17)” Duncan’s blood on the Macbeths’ hands is symbol of the evil crime they committed, the guilt of which cannot be washed away. Pontius Pilate is the supreme example of the futility of the symbolic act of ‘washing the hands’ to expunge guilt. History will forever hold him guilty. Macbeth’s curse, “Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand?

No, this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red. (II,iii,61)” The symbol was also used earlier as Lady Macbeth tries to blame of the murder on the sleeping grooms, “… smear the sleepy grooms with blood. (II,II,49)” Lady Macbeth’s remark on her entry shorty after that “A little water clears us of this deed; How easy it is then! ” shows that she has less immediate guilt for the crime, where Macbeth’s conscience is eating away at him, or that she has not yet absorbed the enormity of the deed.
The same symbol of evil deeds not being washed away is brought out again in (V,II,17) where Angus says, “Now does he feel His secret murders sticking on his hands;” The bloody hand appears again when Lady Macbeth has the waking dreams in which she curses, Lady Macbeth: “Out, damned spot! out I say! … Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him? ” (V,i,38-43) “What! will these hands ne’er be clean? ” (V,i,46) “Here’s the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.

Oh! oh! oh! ” (V,i,52) The guilt of Duncan’s murder, although more present in Macbeth at first, has grown in Lady Macbeth until she began having the same insane visions of her hands getting bloodier and bloodier not ever coming clean. Another symbol in the play is the number “three”. In Shakespeare’s time, the number three was considered unlucky and the people, being quite superstitious, watched plays with witchcraft, murder, and ghosts much the same as we watch horror movies today.

It might be interesting to enquire why today the number “three” is considered lucky and “ten plus three” unlucky. Considering this, one notices immediately the fact that there are three witches, the weird sisters, of the play. The first scene of Act IV contains a number of references to the number three. First Witch: “Thrice the brinded cat hath mew. d” (1) Second Witch: “Thrice and once the hedge-pig whin’d” (2) First Witch: “Days and nights hast thirty-one” (7) First Witch: “Pour in sow’s blood, that hath eaten Her nine farrow;” (65)
All of these examples refer to the number three, or nine, which is three multiplied with itself. The final example of the number three used in the fourth act with Macbeth’s second visit to the weird sisters. There are three apparitions, which call Macbeth’s name three times before they speak. The number three also came up in other contexts. Porter: “… drink, sir, is a great provoker of three things. ” (II,iii,23) On the surface, the porter’s statement may seem like nonsense from a drunken fool, giving the play a break from the dark nature of the act, but there is more to it.

In this scene, Shakespeare is reminding us through his combination of the number three and drinking that drunkenness plays a major role in the events of the act that unfold. For example, Lady Macbeth: “That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold, What hath quench’d them hath given me fire. ” (II,ii,1-2) The symbolism in the play includes that of light and darkness. Macbeth’s insomnia resulting from guilt and Lady Macbeth’s nocturnal excursions while asleep are examples. Macbeth was unable to hide in the dark from the horrors of his deeds and he was haunted by the fear of discovery.

Lady Macbeth, on the other hand, was afraid of the dark and was using the light in an attempt to dispel her demons. Doctor: “How came she by that light? ” Gentlewoman: “Why, it stood by her: she has light by her continually; ’tis her command. ” (V,i,24-25) Shakespeare uses sunlight and darkness in contrast to intensify our understanding of his guilt. Old Man: “Threescore and ten I can remember well; Within the volume of which time I have seen Hours dreadful and things strange, but this sore night Hath trifled former knowings.
Ross: “Ah! good father, Thou seest, the heavens, as troubled with man’s act, Threaten his bloody stage: by the clock ’tis day, And yet dark night strangles the traveling lamp. Is’t night’s predominance, or the day’s shame, That darkness does the face of earth entomb, When living light should kiss it? ” (II,iv,1-10) The darkness of the deed overshadowed the very sun itself. Shakespeare’s birds symbolize the good and evil characters his plays in much the same was as his use of “light” and “darkness” symbolizes these traits.

He used the martlet and the wren to symbolize good, and the raven, owl, and hell-kite (IV,iii,217) to symbolize evil. In the fifth scene of the first act, where news is brought to Lady Macbeth that the king is coming, it is not by chance that she uses the symbol of a raven to describe the messenger, “The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan. (I,v,37)” Not only is the sound of a raven’s call thought to bring death, but the raven itself symbolizes death, blackness and evil. The next scene, scene six, where King Duncan arrives, contains a contrast to the evil raven.
The king expresses his liking for Macbeth’s castle, Banquo speaks of him as a “temple-haunting martlet” (I,vi,4-10) The martlet is a species of swallow which often nests in the steeples of churches. We also note the irony of the description of Macbeth’s castle as being similar to a church where such evil deeds are to be committed. The owl is definitely the most present feathered symbol in the play. This bird of the night appears many times in the play as an omen of death and evil like the raven, but also as a predator which lives by night. This provides yet another example of darkness as evil.

Lady Macbeth’s lines hint at the evil deeds which are to follow. Lady Macbeth: “It was the owl that shrieked, the fatal bellman, Which gives the stern’st good-night. ” (II,ii,3) “I heard the owl scream… ” (II,ii,16) Lennox talks of an “obscure bird” (II,iii,60) in his description of his troubled sleep. It would be most likely a night bird, probably again, the owl. In Ross’s conversation with the old man in Act II, Scene 4, the old man mentions “A falcon, towering in her pride of place, Was by a mousing owl hawk’d at and kill’d,” which suggests the bird of ill-omen has finally stuck.

The owl makes a reappearance later in the fourth act where, left defenseless by Macduff, Lady Macduff: “… for the poor wren The most diminutive of birds, will fight – Her young ones in her next – against the owl. ” (IV,ii,9-11) Shakespeare was if nothing else, a moralist and many or most of his works contained a moral to be heard and noted. For example, The Merchant of Venice and the consequences of greed; Twelfth Night and the foolishness of ambition and virtue as its own reward; Romeo and Juliet and the tragic costs of enmity; The Taming of the Shrew and (in those days) the virtues of obedience, to name but a few.

Macbeth is no exception. It is an example of lust for power and the destruction that follows in its wake. We have many contemporary examples of this in world dictators, military juntas and corporate criminals. So Macbeth can be seen as having contemporary significance. We may now ask why the works of Shakespeare enjoy an undiminishing acceptance in most countries of the world and an aura of immortality. It is perhaps because we see in Shakespeare the mirror of the human condition with which we may all identify and gain a sense that in some strange way his plays belong to us.

Irony in Macbeth

Related Essay Topics

What is Macbeth's Tragic Flaw Dramatic Irony in Macbeth Macbeth's Tragic Flaw Irony in Macbeth Act 1 Scene 1 Summary Act 1 Scene 2 Summary Act 1 Scene 3 Summary Act 1 Scene 4 Summary Act 1 Scene 5 Summary Act 1 Scene 6 Summary Act 1 Scene 7 Summary Act 2 Scene 1 Summary Act 2 Scene 2 Summary Act 2 Scene 3 Summary Act 2 Scene 4 Summary Act 3 Scene 1 Summary Act 3 Scene 2 Summary Act 3 Scene 3 Summary Act 3 Scene 4 Summary Act 3 Scene 5 Summary Act 3 Scene 6 Summary Act 4 Scene 1 Summary Act 4 Scene 2 Summary Act 4 Scene 3 Summary Act 5 Scene 1 Summary Act 5 Scene 10 Summary Act 5 Scene 11 Summary Act 5 Scene 2 Summary Act 5 Scene 3 Summary Act 5 Scene 4 Summary Act 5 Scene 5 Summary Act 5 Scene 6 Summary Act 5 Scene 7 Summary Act 5 Scene 8 Summary Act 5 Scene 9 Summary Characters Motifs Quotes Summary Themes

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • Death Of Salesman And Crucible Death Of Salesman And Crucible Death Of Salesman And Crucible Arthur Miller, winner of many literary and dramatic awards, is an incredibly influential force in American drama. His plays deal with issues common to every society. He makes the audience face fault, weakness, and ignorance; subjects we would typical hide from. At the same time he emphasizes strength, human spirit, and familial love. Alice Griffin believes that Miller\'s plays are important internationally (xii). He belongs to an international theater rather than a...
  • Macbeth Themes Macbeth Themes Macbeth Themes William Shakespeare, in his tragic play Macbeth, written in 1606, dramatizes the unrelenting power of deception, insanity, and greed which ultimately results in the demise of Macbeth. Macbeth allowed his desire to become king overrule his judgement which consummately terminated his existence. The play is full of pestilence and set in Scotland during the eleventh century. In Macbeth, sleeplessness is an important motif that permeates the dramatic structure. Shakespeare uses this f...
  • Macbeth Irony Macbeth Irony Macbeth Irony There can be no argument that William Shakespeare\'s genius and gift of poetic writing is present in Macbeth. In addition, Shakespeare makes use of many outside sources for his work, pulling from political and historical events. Nearly all of Macbeth has a basis in historical fact. Holinshed chronicled in the sixteenth century the histories of England, Scotland, and Ireland. It is from the Historie of Scotland that Shakespeare builds the significance of this popular tragedy. The h...
  • Supernatural Forces In Macbeth Supernatural Forces In Macbeth Supernatural Forces In Macbeth Supernatural Forces in Macbeth Supernatural forces in Shakespeares Macbeth aid the play in creating a suspenseful atmosphere. The use of the supernatural in the witches, the visions, the ghost and the apparitions are the backbone of the climax and provide excuses for Macbeths change of character. Because conscience plays such a central role in Macbeths tragic struggle, many critics have used spiritual and supernatural theories both historical and modern to i...
  • IMAGERY IMAGERY IMAGERY The term imagery has various applications. Generally, imagery includes all kinds of sense perception (not just visual pictures). In a more limited application, the term describes visible objects only. But the term is perhaps most commonly used to describe figurative language, which is as a theme in literature. An example is animal imagery in Othello When Iago tortures Othello with animal images of his wife\'s supposed infidelity, were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys (3.3.40...
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desi Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desi Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Rich...
  • Fate? Are You Sure? Fate? Are You Sure? Fate? Are You Sure? Bob Walker [English-Shakespeare] As one goes through life, many things shape personality and alter the direction one takes in life. These things usually take the form of events that one can look back on and evaluate; one may say, I knew I wanted to become [a writer, painter, king]...here, or wish one could go back and do it all again. These \'turning points\' are very important, and they may result in drastic changes. These changes, however, may be interpreted as fated (tha...
  • Glass Menagerie Glass Menagerie Glass Menagerie In The Glass Menagerie, the main characters are Laura, Amanda, Tom, Jim, and Father. Each character can be found with symbols that best represent them. Laura \'s two symbols are Blue Roses and her glass menagerie, Unicorn. Amanda \'s yellow dress and bathrobe can express her love she has of the past event. Tom \'s symbols are the movies and merchant marine. Jim\'s symbolize itself as a gentlemen caller for Laura. The Father \'s portrait portrays his abandonment of the Wingfield f...
  • Macbeth Macbeth Macbeth Macbeth is the epitome of what the literary world regards a tragic hero. His admirable qualities are supplanted with greed and hate when he is duped by the three witches. Thunder and lightning. Enter three Witches. Yes, it is the first scene from William Shakespeare\'s Macbeth, a tragic tale of one man\'s quest for power and his ultimate defeat. The story revolves around our tragic hero, Macbeth, and how an admirable and noble man, so established in society, can fall so greatly. Throug...
  • Hamlet Hamlet Hamlet One of the most unique elements of the Hamlet character is that he is so human. Many types of readers can identify with him. Hamlet is imperfect, and he is fretful. Hamlet has human properties, and it is his humanity that I intend to explore. Indeed it is these human qualities and imperfections that make his story so tragic. Another tragic part of the play is the plays irony. Irony is an important tool in the hands of the playwright to achieve both comical and/or dramatic effect. There is...
  • Macbeth - Supernatural Theme Macbeth - Supernatural Theme Macbeth - Supernatural Theme The presence of supernatural forces in William Shakespeare\'s, Macbeth, provides for much of the play\'s dramatic tension and the mounting suspense. Several supernatural apparitions throughout the play profoundly affect Macbeth and the evil forces eventually claim Macbeth and destroy his morals. Macbeth\'s ambition was driven by the prophecies of the three witches and unlike Banquo, he was willing to do anything to assure that they actually transpire. Macbeth is ho...
  • Macbeth: Themes Macbeth: Themes Macbeth: Themes Macbeth was written while when Scotland lacked a good Leader to defend it from a Norwasian invasion. During this dangerous situation, Macbeth stood out as the most commanding figure by defeating the rebel army. His thrill towards the witches\' prophecies all confirmed his hopes of becoming the King and replacing King Duncan, who lacked the power and courage to save his country from this invasion. In this essay, I will discuss Macbeth during the many experiences that he had faced ...
  • The Tragedy of Macbeth The Tragedy of Macbeth The Tragedy of Macbeth The Tragedy of Macbeth is plagued with the images that coincide with its many themes. Although there is really no central theme and all seem to intermingle, it would be extremely difficult to research the play in its entirety. Therefore, I\'ve chosen to focus my study towards the recurring image of blood and how it\'s presence affected both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth and the eventual outcome of the play. The blood images in the play had different effects on the two. But perh...
  • Lady Macbeth Lady Macbeth Lady Macbeth Lady Macbeth is a powerful and dramatic character, but her death at the end of the play is no surprise to the audience. Discuss this statement with close reference to the text. Macbeth is one of the most famous tragedies written in the Elizabethan times by William Shakespeare for King James 1. Set in Scotland, it details the story of man, so desperate for the status of king, that he will do anything to achieve it. As an established good and hardy soldier, and quite content wit...
  • Bram Stoker Report Bram Stoker Report Bram Stoker Report Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland on November 8th, 1847. His father was a civil servant in Dublin Castle, and his mother, Charlotte, was a womens lib advocate. They had seven children in nine years; the third of which was Bram. The first seven years of his life he was bedridden with an undiagnosed disease which may have been anything from rheumatic fever, asthma or a form of nonparalytic polio. During these first years of his life as he laid in his bed he listened to st...
  • Literary Terms Analysis With Examples Literary Terms Analysis With Examples Literary Terms Analysis With Examples Literary Terms Analysis with Examples 1) Allusion: An allusion describes a famous literary figure or historical event. In an allusion, the author of a literary work refers to a well-known episode from a book or occasion. Thus, the two things most often alluded to in literature (the two greatest known literary works) deal with Shakespeare\'s plays and the New Testament. Examples: In modern-day literature, George Orwell alludes to the Evil Empire, in his book,...
  • Macbeth Macbeth Macbeth Macbeth: Themes Macbeth was written while when Scotland lacked a good Leader to defend it from a Norwasian invasion. During this dangerous situation, Macbeth stood out as the most commanding figure by defeating the rebel army. His thrill towards the witches\' prophecies all confirmed his hopes of becoming the King and replacing King Duncan, who lacked the power and courage to save his country from this invasion. In this essay, I will discuss Macbeth during the many experiences that he ha...
  • Macbeth: A Play For Our Time Macbeth: A Play For Our Time Macbeth: A Play For Our Time Macbeth, a Play for our Time. The Irony and Symbolism Such is the genius and so great is the scope of Shakespeare\'s writings that there can be little doubt that a common perception is one of an imaginative mind concocting stories. In fact Shakespeare had many sources and much of his work was based on historical fact. Holinshed chronicled in the sixteenth century, the histories of England, Scotland and Ireland, and it is from the Historie of Scotland that Shakespeare...
  • Macbeth Motifs Macbeth Motifs Macbeth Motifs Macbeth Motif Essay William Shakespeare, in his tragic play Macbeth, written in 1606, dramatizes the unrelenting power of deception, insanity, and greed which ultimately results in the demise of Macbeth. Macbeth allowed his desire to become king overrule his judgement which consummately terminated his existence. The play is full of pestilence and set in Scotland during the eleventh century. In Macbeth, sleeplessness is an important motif that permeates the dramatic structure. Shak...
  • Macbeths Irony Macbeths Irony Macbeth\'s Irony Macbeth\'s Irony There can be no argument that William Shakespeare\'s genius and gift of poetic writing is present in Macbeth. In addition, Shakespeare makes use of many outside sources for his work, pulling from political and historical events. Nearly all of Macbeth has a basis in historical fact. Holinshed chronicled in the sixteenth century the histories of England, Scotland, and Ireland. It is from the Historie of Scotland that Shakespeare builds the significance of this pop...
  • Hamlet Hamlet Hamlet One of the most unique elements of the Hamlet character is that he is so human. Many types of readers can identify with him. Hamlet is imperfect, and he is fretful. Hamlet has human properties, and it is his humanity that I intend to explore. Indeed it is these human qualities and imperfections that make his story so tragic. Another tragic part of the play is the plays irony. Irony is an important tool in the hands of the playwright to achieve both comical and/or dramatic effect. There is...
  • The Presence Of Ambition Within Macbeth The Presence Of Ambition Within Macbeth The Presence Of Ambition Within Macbeth The Dead Butcher and His Fiend-Like Queen. Ambition is a quality within every human, however it sometimes drives people to partake in totally unnatural actions. As illustrated in William Shakespeare\'s Macbeth, some forms of ambition can push people into becoming a person very sinister and evil. The ambition which Macbeth and Lady Macbeth encounter within Shakespeare\'s play not only drives them to become ruthless killers, but is the cause of the two chara...
  • Macbeth Act 2:1-4 Macbeth Act 2:1-4 Macbeth Act 2:1-4 Summary of Act 2, Scene 1: Past midnight, Macbeth tells Banquo that they\'ll speak of the witches another time, and bids him goodnight. . . . Macbeth sees a dagger of the mind, hears his wife\'s bell, and goes to kill King Duncan. Enter Banquo and Fleance. Banquo: How goes the night, boy? (2.1.1). Enter Macbeth and a Servant. Banquo: Give me my sword. / Who\'s there? (2.1.9-10). Exit Banquo and Fleance. Macbeth: Is this a dagger which I see before me, / The handle toward ...
  • Role of the foll in shakespeares king lear Role of the foll in shakespeares king lear role of the foll in shakespeare\'s king lear Alison Dew Explore the role of the fool in King Lear. In Elizabethan times, the role of a fool, or court jester, was to professionally entertain others, specifically the king. In essence, fools were hired to make mistakes. Fools may have been mentally retarded youths kept for the courts amusement, or more often they were singing, dancing stand up comedians. In William Shakespeares King Lear the fool plays many important roles. When Cordelia, Lear...
  • Macbeth - Supernatural Theme Macbeth - Supernatural Theme Macbeth - Supernatural Theme The presence of supernatural forces in William Shakespeare\'s, Macbeth, provides for much of the play\'s dramatic tension and the mounting suspense. Several supernatural apparitions throughout the play profoundly affect Macbeth and the evil forces eventually claim Macbeth and destroy his morals. Macbeth\'s ambition was driven by the prophecies of the three witches and unlike Banquo, he was willing to do anything to assure that they actually transpire. Macbeth is ho...