Imagery in Romeo and Juliet


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Like a candle in the darkness, the imagery of light in dark comes up a lot in Romeo and Juliet. "O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright," Romeo says when he first sees Juliet. ... The imagery of light and darkness also picks up the play's emphasis on the contrasts between love and hate, passion and death.

Imagery in Romeo and Juliet

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory



Thumb Biting
Unless you're fluent in childish Elizabethan gestures (anyone? Bueller?), you might be wondering what the what Sampson's up to when he spots the Montague's servants on the streets and announces, "I will bite my thumb at / them, which is disgrace to them if they bear it" (1.1.43-44).

Basically, thumb biting, which involves biting and then flicking one's thumb from behind the upper teeth, is a Shakespearean version of flipping someone the bird and saying "nanny nanny boo boo." It's an insulting gesture that sounds just a wee bit (okay, a lot) immature. Here's how it all goes down in the play:

ABRAHAM
Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON
I do bite my thumb, sir.

ABRAHAM
Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAMPSON
[aside to Gregory] Is the law of our side, if I
say 'Ay'?

GREGORY
No.

SAMPSON
No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir,
but I bite my thumb, sir. (1.1.45-52)

Sampson doesn't have a good reason to insult the Montagues' servants—he's basically looking to stir up trouble because his masters (the Capulets) are feuding with the Montagues. The funny thing is, Sampson's too much of a coward to own up to his silly gesture because the "law" won't be on his "side" if his thumb biting causes a big old brawl (he doesn't want to get busted for causing a fracas).

Pretty dumb, right? And that seems to be Shakespeare's point. The Capulet/ Montague feud, which has obviously trickled down to involve their servants, is completely absurd. Just like Sampson's thumb biting.

Sex and Death
Sex and death: pretty much the opposite of each other, right? Not in Romeo and Juliet. In fact, Romeo and Juliet sees to think sex and death go together like, uh, Oreos and milk.

In the very first scene, Sampson crudely puns on the term "maidenhead" (virginity) when he equates sword fighting against men with raping women: "When I have fought with the men I will be civil with the maids—I will cut off their heads […] the heads of maids or their maidenheads" (1.1.23-24; 26). Yikes. Remind us to keep away from Sampson, K?

But crude sex/ death jokes aren't just for belligerent servants. Even Juliet links sex and death by punning on the word "die" when, day-dreaming about her impending wedding night with Romeo, she imagines Romeo being transformed into a bunch of "little stars" lighting up the night sky: "Give me my Romeo, and when I shall die / Take him and cut him out in little stars, / And he will make the face of heaven so fine" (3.2.23-25). Fun fact: Juliet's playing with the fact that "die" was slang for "orgasm." So, "when I shall die" … yeah. You can connect the dots, right?

Even Capulet gets in on the game, when Capulet sees his daughter's lifeless body and says that "death" has "lain with" (slept with) Juliet: "See, there she lies, / Flower as she was, deflowered by him. Death is my son-in-law, death is my heir" (4.5.42-44). (By the way, Capulet has no idea at this point that Juliet is married to Romeo—he still thinks she was all set to marry Paris and is still a virgin.) So, "death" (think orgasm) is linked to "deflowering" (think death). Pretty twisted.

If your mind isn't blown enough yet, we have one more for you: Romeo drinks his poison from a goblet, a traditional symbol of female sexuality. (Sound familiar? This same symbolism is used in the Da Vinci Code, where the Grail, a big V-shaped goblet, symbolizes, well, a woman's genitalia.) Juliet, in contrast, stabs herself with Romeo's dagger—i.e., a penis (source Marjorie Garber). Oh, and guess what the word "vagina" literally means in Latin? "Sheath." So, when she thrusts the dagger into her chest, as though she's putting it into a sheath … We're pretty sure you can connect the dots on that one, too.

But what does it all mean? Symbolically, Romeo and Juliet combine physical death and sexual climax. It's all pretty ironic, really. Typically, sex acts between men and women are supposed to result in the creation of life (making babies, that is). Yet, in the play, that's just not the case.

Oxymoron and Paradox
If you like jumbo shrimp or boneless ribs, then you and Shakespeare have something in common: you both like oxymora.

An oxymoron is a Greek expression that refers to the combination of two terms that are ordinarily opposite—like "oxy," meaning "sharp," and "moron," meaning "dull." Jumbo shrimp? Boneless ribs? Both oxymora.

Shakespeare loved these things, particularly in Romeo and Juliet. For example, at the end of the famous balcony scene, when Romeo is leaving, Juliet says "parting is such sweet / sorrow" (2.2.199-200). "Sweet sorrow?" Totally oxymora.

Think that's impressive? Get a load of Juliet's use of 6 oxymora when she finds out that lover boy (that would be Romeo) has killed her cousin, Tybalt:

O serpent heart, hid with a flow'ring face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant, fiend angelical!
Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despised substance of divinest show!
Just opposite to what thou justly seem'st,
A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace! (3.2.79-91)

Clearly, Juliet is experiencing some mixed emotions—she wonders how the love of her life, the guy she thought was so wonderful, could be a killer. Juliet's use of oxymoron here gives expression to her turmoil.

This passage is also full of paradoxes, longer statements that contradict themselves and nonetheless seem true—like when Juliet asks, "Was ever a book containing such vile matter so fairly bound?"

The point is that these oxymora and paradoxes work with the major paradox at the center of the play, expressed in Juliet's cry, "My only love sprung from my only hate" (1.5.152). By using oxymora and paradox through the play, Shakespeare manages to make the form (how it's being said) match up with the content (what's being said). Pretty nifty.

Plants and Poison
What doesn't kill you makes you stronger—unless it puts you into a near-death state that fools your husband. The point is, poison (and medicine) are a big deal in Romeo and Juliet. Like love and hate, the difference between them is pretty slim.

Before Romeo and Juliet take their lives, Friar Laurence, who's big into herbal medicine, shows Romeo a flower and makes a cryptic statement that seems to echo throughout the play:

Within the infant rind of this weak flower
Poison hath residence and medicine power:
For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each
part;
Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
Two such opposèd kings encamp them still
In man as well as herbs—grace and rude will;
And where the worser is predominant,
Full soon the canker death eats up that plant. (2.2.23-31)

Friar Laurence suggests that, depending on how it's used, a flower can be healing (because it's aromatic) or poisonous (if it's orally ingested). The Friar also muses that people are a lot like the flower he holds in his hand—being full of both "grace" and "rude will," human beings also have the capacity to be good or deadly, depending on whether or not "rude will" takes over.

We can't help but notice that Friar Laurence's observations speak directly to the play's tragedy—Romeo and Juliet's love turns deadly when it's "poisoned" by their family's hateful feud. At the same time, their love also has the capacity to heal, which becomes evident when their parents decide to reconcile at the play's end.

Queen Mab
First things first: if you haven't already, go back and read Mercutio's Queen Mab speech in Act I, Scene 4. (Or give yourself a little treat, and watch this version from Franco Zeffirelli's 1968 version.)

Let's start with the basics. According to Mercutio's vivid description, Queen Mab is a tiny fairy that rides around in a coach made out of an "empty hazelnut" with spider's "legs" for wheel spokes (1.4.72, 64). The coach is driven by an even tinier "grey-coated gnat" and drawn by a "team of little atomi" (tiny atoms).

Queen Mab spends her time galloping over the noses and lips of sleepers, filling their dreams with wild fantasies (lovers dream of love, soldiers dream of slitting throats, lawyers dream of winning lawsuits, etc.). Mab (whose name is also a slang word for "whore") is also kind of scary. When she's in a bad mood, she plagues women who dream of "kisses" with nasty sores ("blisters") that might just be cold sores but might also be nastier things, like pox from syphilis, and she's fond of making young, virginal girls have naughty dreams.

So, why is everything about Queen Mab so tiny and sexual? To answer that, we need to think about what it is that prompts Mercutio's wild rant in the first place. Fed up with Romeo's lovesick moping for Rosaline, Mercutio taunts his buddy by saying that Queen Mab must have paid him a visit in the dream Romeo tries to tell him about. Mercutio also informs Romeo that dreams "are the children of an idle brain," which is another way of saying that Romeo is an idiot and his dreams about Rosaline are ridiculous (1.4.104). Given the context of the speech, it seems like Mercutio is suggesting that, like Queen Mab, dreams (especially Romeo's) are small and insignificant.

Pretty wild stuff, don't you think? It's easy to see why, in Baz Luhrmann's 1996 film, Romeo + Juliet, Mercutio takes a hit of ecstasy before delivering his "Queen Mab" speech—the whole thing can seem like drug-induced nonsense. Romeo all but says so when he yells, "Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace! Thou talk'st of nothing" (1.4.101-102).

Light in Darkness
Like a candle in the darkness, the imagery of light in dark comes up a lot in Romeo and Juliet. "O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright," Romeo says when he first sees Juliet. "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night / As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear" (1.5.42-53).

Variations on this imagery are repeated again and again—images of Juliet as a sun rising in the darkness, of Juliet's eyes shining in the sky, images of Romeo's body cut out in little stars, of Romeo and Juliet's love as a bright furious lightning flash. At times, the image of a flash of light disappearing into the dusk seems to symbolize both the brilliant strength of Romeo and Juliet's love, as well as its transience. The imagery of light and darkness also picks up the play's emphasis on the contrasts between love and hate, passion and death.

Night
Night is a pretty important time in the play. It's when all the passionate love scenes occur so, night seems to shelter and protects the lovers, while the glare of day threatens to reveal them. In contrast, the heat of the sun makes the young men of Verona irritable and prone to violence and the street brawls occur during the daytime.

We often think of night as both a time for romance and liberation, as well as a time of danger, and the imagery of night and darkness in Romeo and Juliet carries both night's promises and its threats. Hidden in darkness, Romeo and Juliet's love is free from the social rules that would divide them. But danger also lurks in the darkness, and the secrecy of Romeo and Juliet's marriage will prove fatal to them.

"For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring" (3.1.4).

Love
Say what you will about Baz Luhrmann (uh, vulgar and flashy), he gets it: during Romeo and Juliet's first love scene, he dunks Claire Danes and Leonardo DiCaprio in a swimming pool. So what? Check out what Romeo says to Juliet during that scene: "Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized" (2.2.54).

In the Christian tradition, baptism—dunking or sprinkling someone with water—is a symbol of rebirth; it welcomes new Christians into the community of faith. By saying that Juliet's love will "baptize" him, Romeo is saying that Juliet's love has the potential to make him reborn.

And that's not all. Romeo is constantly comparing his love for Juliet to a religious experience. When the pair first meets, Romeo calls Juliet a "saint" and implies that he'd really like to 'worship' her body (1.5.114). Not only that, but Romeo's "hand" would be "blessed" if it touched the divine Juliet's (1.5). Eventually, Juliet picks up on this 'religion of love' conceit (a conceit is just an elaborate metaphor) and declares that Romeo is "the god of [her] idolatry" (2.2.120).

Death
Both lovers have intimations of coming death—Romeo before he even arrives at the Capulet's party, and Juliet when she sees Romeo climbing from her window on his way to exile in Mantua. "Oh god, I have an ill-divining soul," she calls down to him. "Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, / as one dead in the bottom of a tomb" (3.5.54-56). In the most literal possible way, Juliet's drug-induced deathlike state foreshadows her own death. And the apothecary from whom Romeo buys the poison is described as looking like death—thin, starving, with hollow eyes. Romeo buys his suicide weapon from a man that symbolizes death.

Imagery in Romeo and Juliet

Imagery in Romeo and Juliet

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Romeo and Juliet: Imagery of Love



Romeo and Juliet: Imagery of Love William Shakespeare’s play, “The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet,” is the story of two “star crossed” lovers who both meet a tragic end. Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy; however, the poetic and vivid manner in which Shakespeare engages the viewer or reader make this a beautiful play. The story of Romeo and Juliet is timeless, and it has provided a model for many other stories. The story line or plot in Romeo and Juliet is well loved by many around the world, but that is not what gives the play its special quality.

Just as in most of Shakespeare’s plays, words and phrases with double meanings, imagery and poetry are all used to create a play that is not only a pleasure for the eyes, but one for the ears and mind as well. The following statement by Romeo in act one scene one provides a good example of this: Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs, Being purg’d, a fire sparkling in lover’s eyes, Being vex’d, a sea nourish’d with loving tears. What is it else? A madness most discreet, A choking gall, and a preserving sweet (Riverside, 1. 1. 190-193).
Shakespeare’s use of these components is exquisite and allows for much deeper involvement by the reader or viewer. In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare uses imagery in the forms of lightness and darkness, animals, and plants or herbs to provide the reader or viewer with a more vivid and enjoyable experience. Lightness and Darkness Imagery of lightness and darkness is used extensively throughout Romeo and Juliet to symbolize and/or describe events that take place. Capulet describes the party he is planning with lightness and darkness, “Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light”(1. . 25). Stars continue to have a role in the play as Juliet mentions her own death she claims, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with the night, And pay no worship to the garish sun(3. 2. 22-25). It seems that Juliet, unknowingly, is describing the future in a symbolic sense. Later in the play, after Romeo is banished from Verona for the slaying of Tybalt, he and Juliet exchange lines that are full of light imagery.

As the dawn is approaching, Romeo describes the view, “Look, love, what envious streaks / Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east / Night’s candles are burnt out . . . “(3. 5. 7-9). Romeo is telling Juliet with this line that the sun is coming up, which could be dangerous for him since he has been banished. However, Juliet seems to disclaim Romeo’s claim with her own saying, Yond light is not day-light, I know it, I; It is some meteor that the sun [exhaled] To be to thee this night a torch-bearer And light thee on thy way to Mantua(3. 5. 13-15). However, Juliet realizes that Romeo is right, so she sends him off.
In the same scene Romeo uses more light and dark imagery when he says, “More light and light, more dark and dark / our woes! (3. 5. 36-37). Apparently, Romeo is saying that their love, light, will bring about their death, dark. Furthermore, Romeo’s words seem to indicate the “two” lovers by repeating the words light and dark two times each. Nevertheless, events are not the only aspect of the play that lightness and darkness seem to have significance. Feelings or emotions are described several times in the play through images of lightness and darkness.

Upon Romeo’s first sight of his future wife he states, “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright”(1. 5. 44). Romeo’s feelings about Juliet’s beauty are very well known by the reader or viewer. Later in the play, Romeo speaks some of the most well known words from the play, “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks / It is the east and Juliet is the sun”(2. 2. 2-3). During this scene, Romeo describes Juliet as being so radiant that her light does to the sunlight what the sunlight does to a lamp. This is very powerful imagery, which seems to indicate that Juliet has much control over Romeo.
Animal Imagery Animal imagery, especially in the form of birds, seems to be a recurring theme in the play. In act two, scene two, Juliet summons Romeo, “Hist, Romeo, hist! O, for a falc’ner’s voice / To lure this tassel-gentle back again(2. 2. 158-59). This is falconry terminology from that time period. Furthermore, in an article from Notes and Queries, titled, “Romeo’s Niece: A Note on ‘Romeo and Juliet’, “author Horst Breuer, referring to the usage of the word “niesse” in act two scene two, maintains, “An ‘eyas’ is a hawk or falcon fledgling, a young inexperienced bird which may be tamed and trained easily”(54).

It would seem that Juliet is the hawk, and Romeo is the falconer. Nevertheless, references to other animal forms is a common theme throughout the play. Some of the references to animal imagery are romantic, while others are not so romantic. Romeo is awestricken by Juliet’s beauty as he compares her to the other women at the party, “So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows”(1. 5. 48). After Juliet learns of Tybalt’s death at the hands of her beloved, Romeo, She uses a series of oxymorons that use images of animals.
Juliet says, “Dove-feather’d raven! wolvish ravening lamb”(3. 2. 76). Juliet is expressing her mixed emotions about the terrible thing that has happened. This type of imagery is common in the play, but it is not the most common or the most important. Herbs and Plants Probably, the most important and the most common type of imagery in this tragedy are the references to herbs and plants. In act one scene three, the nurse and Lady Capulet are discussing Paris, Lady Capulet says, “Verona’s summer hath not such a flower”(1. . 77). In the article, “Verona’s Summer Flower: the “Virtues” of Herb Paris in ‘Romeo and Juliet,” in the journal, ANQ, Susanna Greer Fein describes the symbolic importance of Paris: Count Paris is a character in Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ whose name is an allusion to the herb paris. Otherwise known as ‘four-leaved grass,’ ‘true love’s knot,’ ‘true lover’s knot’ and ‘truelove,’ herb paris, which is a flower that blooms only in summer, is a fitting symbolism because Count Paris’ love for Juliet fades with time.

In contrast, Romeo, whose name is a connotation for the herb rosemary or remembrance, offers a more lasting love for Juliet(5). It is fitting that herbs be symbolically portrayed in the play. Conclusion The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet is a masterpiece that withstands the test of time. According to some of his sonnets, Shakespeare hoped that his work would live on, and it has. His wonderful ability to use such vivid and symbolic imagery as he does in this play amazes this writer.

Imagery in Romeo and Juliet

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  • Romeo And Juliet Film Review Romeo And Juliet Film Review Romeo And Juliet Film Review Dont Hang Up Philosophy Philosophy Can Make A Movie Film: Romeo and Juliet Director: Baz Luhrmann Stars: Leonardo DiCaprio & Claire Danes Plot: Two lovers of rival, disputing families take their lives. Rating: Reviewer: Claire Ginn Welcome to Verona Beach, a sexy, violent other-world, neither future nor past, ruled by two rival families, the Montagues and the Capulets... So begins Baz Luhrmanns production of Shakespeare\'s beloved play, Romeo and Juliet, from th...
  • Contrast in Language Contrast in Language Contrast in Language Contrast Between Language of Love in the Balcony Scene and the Language of Death in the Final Scene of Romeo and Juliet In William Shakespeare\'s Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare introduces many themes that he continues throughout all of his tragedies, including the language of love vs. the language of death. The balcony scene is the most valuable scene illustrating the language of love, whereas in the final scene of the play the language of death is used to set the stage for t...
  • What are the chief aspects of their relationship a What are the chief aspects of their relationship a What are the chief aspects of their relationship and how are these aspects emphasised by Romeo and Juliets use of language? Romeo and Juliet is undoubtedly the most famous love story in English literary history; love is the plays dominant and most important theme. Shakespeare has focused on romanticism, specifically the intense love and passion that flourishes between the two characters after their first sighting of each other. Love in this play has many guises; it is violent, ecstatic, and a...
  • Romeo And Juliet Quote Essay Romeo And Juliet Quote Essay Romeo And Juliet Quote Essay Act 2; Scene 2; Lines 36-39 and 41-52 36 O Romeo, Romeo wherefore art thou Romeo? 37 Deny thy father and refuse thy name, 38 Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, 39 And I\'ll no longer be a Capulet. 41 \'Tis but thy name that is my enemy. 42 Thou art thyself, thou not a Montague. 43 What\'s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot, 44 Nor arm, nor face, [nor any other part] 45 Belonging to a man. O, be some other name! 46 What\'s in a name? That which we call a rose...
  • Contrast in Language Contrast in Language Contrast in Language Contrast Between Language of Love in the Balcony Scene and the Language of Death in the Final Scene of Romeo and Juliet In William Shakespeare\'s Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare introduces many themes that he continues throughout all of his tragedies, including the language of love vs. the language of death. The balcony scene is the most valuable scene illustrating the language of love, whereas in the final scene of the play the language of death is used to set the stage for t...
  • Romeo And Juliet: From Play To Big Screen Romeo And Juliet: From Play To Big Screen Romeo And Juliet: From Play To Big Screen Romeo and Juliet: From Play to Big Screen In 1596, William Shakespeare published the tragic tale of two star-crossed lovers, Romeo and Juliet. The origins of this story are uncertain but Shakespeares chief source for his adoption of the story was from &The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet, a poem by Arthur Brooke (1562). He also knew the story from Palace of Pleasure, by William Painter, which appeared in several editions prior to 1580.(Boyce 5...
  • 13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tol 13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tol 13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tolerant of violence on stage than we are? In addition to the visible bloodletting, there is endless discussion of past gory deeds. Offstage violence is even brought into view in the form of a severed head. It\'s almost as though such over-exposure is designed to make it ordinary. At the same time, consider the basic topic of the play, the usurpation of the crown of England and its consequences. These are dramatic events. They can support the highl...
  • Midsummer Nights Dream Midsummer Nights Dream Midsummer Night\'s Dream The Elements of Fantasy vs. Reality The elements of fantasy in a Midsummer Night\'s Dream are apparent throughout the movie and there are many examples of this that relate to the real world. In the play the fantasy world and real world exist apart from each other, never meeting at any point. The inhabitants of the fairy world are unreal in the sense that they lack feelings and intelligence. The dream world, beyond mortal\'s comprehension, strongly influences the entire r...
  • Romeo And Juliet - Contrast in Language Romeo And Juliet - Contrast in Language Romeo And Juliet - Contrast in Language Contrast Between Language of Love in the Balcony Scene and the Language of Death in the Final Scene of Romeo and Juliet In William Shakespeare\'s Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare introduces many themes that he continues throughout all of his tragedies, including the language of love vs. the language of death. The balcony scene is the most valuable scene illustrating the language of love, whereas in the final scene of the play the language of death is used to ...