Hormone Imbalances


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hormone imbalances Identification of Self




The self of every human being is a construct of numerous elements, both internal as well as external.  According to Baumeister Personal identity is a  crucial interface between the private organism and society.  The identity represents an important means by which the physical being takes its place in society so as to communicate and interact with other people (191).   Many things influence and shape someones identity and sense of self.  Those of us in transition from adolescence to adulthood are especially prone to these influences.  These include both social circumstances and a list of unique personal attributes.  Individuals in this age group (around the age of 16 to 24) usually experience a number of major changes which force them to make personal decisions with which they have never been faced.  
Most decision during this age range involve what plans to make for the future.  One of these timely decisions include whether to continue their education or not.  After graduating from high school there are many decisions to be made.  One important choice is whether to keep on going in school.  Now society strongly encourages a college education.  This is just something that has evolved over the generations.  Thirty years ago it was not as common for young men  and especially young women to go to college after graduation from high school.  The job market today has become so competitive that it is almost impossible to get a decent paying job without a college degree.  
The decision to attend college is just the beginning of ones concerns.  Once the choice to attend college has been made, there are many more steps ahead.    No longer is the individual able to soley depend on parents and caretakers to look out for their best interest.  Suddenly, they are completely and totally responsible for each of their own actions.  This includes the decision of which college to go to.  Should they leave home in order to do so or not.  It can be a completely different experience if you attend school close to home or far away.  Going farther from home causes one to adjust more to an individual life merely because of the distance between themselves and their parents or guardians.  Personally, I came to Miami from Rochester , New York.  Choosing to leave my home in upstate New York to go to another state was a test on my ability to make it on my own.  The distance has proven to be a challenge as well as a blessing.  It has allowed me to distance myself from my parents literally and figuratively.  I have become my own person and have become a lot more independent.  I have also believe that attending school away from home has expanded my horizons.  Being in a completely different city and state, I have experienced  that just small differences can be so noticeable.  
In addition, upon leaving home to pursue a college education, young men and women are usually handed a totally new set of responsibilities, as well as a dramatically increased amount of personal freedom.  This change in societal structure includes the challenges of balancing academics, social and leisure time, finances, and a host of other personal concerns that come along with becoming an independent college student.   By providing such an environment, colleges and universities offer young people an unmatched opportunity to make lasting discoveries and developments concerning their individual identities and self-perceptions.
It has been stated repeatedly in seminar that coming to college has given a number of students the chance to either finally be "themselves", or someone "new" and "different" from who they have been up to the present time.  This supports the idea that both men and women often look upon making changes in their surroundings as a time for also making changes in their inner selves.  Consequently, a number of social psychologists agree that "change is very likely to occur when one receives feedback that is inconsistent with his or her existing self-schema or when one moves from one community to another" (Baron and Byrne 168).   Baumeister's viewpoint, concerning the modern western individual, is that " the modern self is seen as having a license and obligation to create itself" (206).   He also ... more

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Genetic Testing and Its Social Implications

Probably, applied genetics most impacts on society are as a result of genetic tests. In general, genetic tests seek to detect some feature of a persons genetic constitution. This feature can be a disease causing mutation or a marker DNA sequence used to detect presence of another gene. Obviously these procedures used for testing the status of DNA, RNA or chromosomes are included in genetic tests. What is more it is possible to include some protein based tests and classical medical examinations when they aim to detect inheritance of a trait. Genetic tests have been divided into four categories in this text, and they will be examined in greater detail later. These categories are:
Prenatal tests that are applied on fetuses during pregnancy.
Neonatal screening just after birth and career screening of marrying couples.
Testing for serious late-onset disease before the symptoms occur.
Testing to assess the probability of developing complex disease.

There are a couple of considerations about genetic tests:
1. First of all, the tests should be reliable. When a positive or a negative result is obtained, we should be confident in that result with a confidence approaching 100%. To achieve such a high accuracy is not as easy as it may at first appear to be. Meiotic recombinations that always occur take place during gamete generation, may separate a disease-associated gene and a marker DNA sequence which is used to detect mutated genes. False positive or negative results could be obtained. In addition, genetic tests look for the most common mutations that cause the disease. For example, a test would detect CFTR?F508 (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Receptor) mutation, however it is not possible to detect infinite number of other mutations. Therefore, a genetic test can give such results so that the physician is convinced that his patient is normal while he is affected by an undetectable mutation. New tests are continuously being developed. Doctors and genetic counselors who will use these tests in the future, should be well informed about newly emerging tests.

2. Extremely accurate genetic tests can only be developed by thorough experimentation on human subjects. Although there is generally no physiological risk in experimenting a person, the subjects should be informed that the applied test is not entirely reliable and in experimentation state. Informing subjects of experimentation is an obligation set by the Nuremberg Code. Just after World War II it was discovered that unethical experiments had been performed on humans who were kept in concentration camps of Nazi Germany. This situation was discovered in Nuremberg Trials, and ethical and legal standards for medical experimentation were set then. Research and common medical procedures are distinct concepts. If a genetic tests validity has been proven by extensive research and the test being used as a routine medical procedure to diagnose patients, it is no more considered as experimental and is not covered by the Nuremberg Code. Nevertheless, the patient should be well informed and his consent should be taken even before applying a routine test. The subject of the test should fully understand the nature of the test and the consequences that may arise from it. The subject of the test should be fully aware of the nature of the test and the consequences caused by the test. Therefore, a professional counselor is needed to psychologically counsel and inform the subjects both before and after the test is taken. Sometimes, the person taking the test cannot give an informed consent when it is a small child or mentally retarded person. In this case, it is still required to take consent of the parents or legal guardians. The tests should only be applied for vital medical reasons. For example, it is not very ethical to test a young girl for a sex linked genetic disease. Because it is intensely related with the future life of the girl, her consent should be taken. As a rule of thumb, the physician performing the tests should consider the childrens opinion and give an increasing importance to them with their age.

3. Tests should not be carried out if there is not sufficient reason to do so. The person tested may face extremely unfavorable outcomes and this may cause psychological distress. Deciding ... more

hormone imbalances

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  • H: Self H: Self self The self of every human being is a construct of numerous elements, both internal as well as external. According to Baumeister Personal identity is a crucial interface between the private organism and society. The identity represents an important means by which the physical being takes its place in society so as to communicate and interact with other people (191). Many things influence and shape someones identity and sense of self. Those of us in transition from adolescence to adulthood...
  • O: Identification of Self O: Identification of Self Identification of Self The self of every human being is a construct of numerous elements, both internal as well as external. According to Baumeister Personal identity is a crucial interface between the private organism and society. The identity represents an important means by which the physical being takes its place in society so as to communicate and interact with other people (191). Many things influence and shape someones identity and sense of self. Those of us in transition from adoles...
  • R: Genetic Testing And Its Social Implications R: Genetic Testing And Its Social Implications Genetic Testing And Its Social Implications Probably, applied genetics\' most impacts on society are as a result of genetic tests. In general, genetic tests seek to detect some feature of a person\'s genetic constitution. This feature can be a disease causing mutation or a marker DNA sequence used to detect presence of another gene. Obviously these procedures used for testing the status of DNA, RNA or chromosomes are included in genetic tests. What is more it is possible to include some protein ...
  • M: The Truth About Diabetes M: The Truth About Diabetes The Truth About Diabetes The Truth About Diabetes Diabetes is a killer; in fact, it is among the top ten killers of adults in the United States. It can lead to, or contribute to, a number of other serious diseases (Sizer and Whitney 112). Diabetes means syphon or to run through (Sizer and Whitney 112) therefore denoting the increase in urinary volume excreted by people suffering from this disease. Mellitus means sweet . Diabetes mellitus means increased excretion of sugars being released with th...
  • O: The road to beauty is a long and thin one O: The road to beauty is a long and thin one the road to beauty is a long and thin one The definition of beauty as found in Websters New World Dictionary is, Beauty- 1. the quality of being pleasing, as in form, color, etc. 2.a thing with this quality. 3. good looks. 4. a very attractive person, feautre, etc. The concepts of beauty were first described by the anicient greeks. The classical values pushed order and serenity. Greek philosphers Plato and Socrates were attempting to define beauty. They thought of objects or nature as being ...
  • N: Erectile Dysfunctions N: Erectile Dysfunctions Erectile Dysfunctions ERECTILE DYSFUNCTIONS Erection problems are estimated to effect more than ten million American men. At some point in a males life, they are likely to have this problem, ranging from maybe one or two times, or as severe as impotence. Studies have shown that men 18-24 have a low percentage of erectional difficulties, but there is a high percentage of men 51-60 that have this problem. Yet age is not the only factor for this problem. Many factors contribute to erectile dysfunct...
  • E: Anorexia E: Anorexia anorexia Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not other wise specified. According to the World of Psychology anorexia is defin...
  •  : Anorexia : Anorexia Anorexia By: Anonymous It seems today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. The purpose of this paper is to discuss eating disorders and prove the these disease, specifically Anorexia Nervosa, continue to plague of women due to psychological and environmental factors along with pressure from the media. The term Anorexia Nervosa is misleading. It means loss of appetite due to ne...
  • I: Psychology I: Psychology Psychology Causes, Symptoms, Complications and Treatments for the eating disorder Anorexia Nervosa. Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating...
  • M: Diabetes M: Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, is a chronic illness this means that it has no cure and the symptoms persist over a long period of time. This illness is a result of an imbalance of hormones, insulin, produced in the pancreas. Insulin plays an important role in how the body uses food. Insulin enables the cells in the bloodstream to absorb and use glucose for fuel. If the pancreas produces too little or no insulin or if the insulin doesn\'t work properly the person may become diabet...
  • B: Depression psychological B: Depression psychological Depression psychological Depression is one of the most common psychological problems, affecting nearly everyone through either personal experience or through depression in a family member. The cost in human suffering cannot be estimated. Depression can interfere with normal functioning, and frequently causes problems with work, social, and family adjustment. It causes pain and suffering not only to those who have a disorder, but also to those who care about them. Serious depression can destroy f...
  • A: Bipolar research A: Bipolar research bipolar research Miguel Amador Abnormal Psychology Professor Cleveland April 13, 2004 Bipolar Illness Bipolar illness, also called manic depression, is misdiagnosed on the average of two out of three times; unfortunately it is an illness that kills one in four afflicted persons. Major psychiatric disorders such as bipolar illness make up half of the leading causes of disease related disability in the United States (www.windsofchange.com/bipol.html). Bipolar illness is a major psychological disor...
  • L: Anorexia nervosa L: Anorexia nervosa anorexia nervosa Anorexia is an eating disorder that usually strikes women between the ages of fifteen and thirty-five. An estimated one thousand females will die each year from anorexia. About eighty percent of females suffer from a sub clinical eating disorder and twenty percent will turn into full-blown anorexics in their lifetime. These are statistics that we know of. Anorexia can be hidden very well by many that suffer from it; therefore there are many cases we do not know of. Anorexia is a...
  • A: Anorexia A: Anorexia anorexia Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not other wise specified. According to the World of Psychology anorexia is defin...
  • N: Obesity N: Obesity Obesity Obesity Obesity also called CORPULENCE, or FATNESS, excessive accumulation of body fat, usually caused by the consumption of more calories than the body can use. The excess calories are then stored as fat, or adipose tissue. Overweight, if moderate, is not necessarily obesity, particularly in muscular or large-boned individuals. In general, however, a body weight20 percent or more over the optimum tends to be associated with obesity. The body's ability to adjust food intake to body needs...
  • C: Anorexia C: Anorexia Anorexia By: Anonymous It seems today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. The purpose of this paper is to discuss eating disorders and prove the these disease, specifically Anorexia Nervosa, continue to plague of women due to psychological and environmental factors along with pressure from the media. The term Anorexia Nervosa is misleading. It means loss of appetite due to ne...
  • E: The Road To Beauty Is A Long And Thin One E: The Road To Beauty Is A Long And Thin One The Road To Beauty Is A Long And Thin One The definition of beauty as found in Websters New World Dictionary is, Beauty- 1. the quality of being pleasing, as in form, color, etc. 2.a thing with this quality. 3. good looks. 4. a very attractive person, feautre, etc. The concepts of beauty were first described by the anicient greeks. The classical values pushed order and serenity. Greek philosphers Plato and Socrates were attempting to define beauty. They thought of objects or nature as being inhe...
  • S: DRUGS IN SPORT S: DRUGS IN SPORT DRUGS IN SPORT Drug use has been a part of competitive sport for almost a century. At the first olympics in Athens in 1896, marathon runners drank a mixture of brandy and strychnine to help them on their ways and used opiates to control pain during a race. Use of alcohol was very common in the early years of the twentieth century. It might be argued that the first athletes to use drugs to enhance their performance were, in fact, cheating. We need to remember that drug use is not new. East German...
  • Obesity Obesity Obesity Obesity also called CORPULENCE, or FATNESS, excessive accumulation of body fat, usually caused by the consumption of more calories than the body can use. The excess calories are then stored as fat, or adipose tissue. Overweight, if moderate, is not necessarily obesity, particularly in muscular or large-boned individuals. In general, however, a body weight 20 percent or more over the optimum tends to be associated with obesity. The body\'s ability to adjust food intake to body needs can b...
  • Anorexia Anorexia Anorexia By: Anonymous It seems today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. The purpose of this paper is to discuss eating disorders and prove the these disease, specifically Anorexia Nervosa, continue to plague of women due to psychological and environmental factors along with pressure from the media. The term Anorexia Nervosa is misleading. It means loss of appetite due to ne...
  • Nursing Care Plan Nursing Care Plan Nursing Care Plan Dates of Care: 12, 13, 19 & 20 Sept 96 Student Names: Anthony Bernardi, SN/SPJC Clients Clinical Picture (5) Textbook Description of Diagnosis (5) Summary of Clients Progress (5) Completion of Holistic NCP Tool (30) Clients Clinical Picture (Cephacaudal Assessment) 5 Textbook Description of Disease 6-12 Treatments and Procedures 13 Summary of Caregiver Progress Notes 14 Diagnostic Values Out Of Normal Range Clinical Implications 16 Holistic Nursing Care Plan Form...
  • Anorexia Nervosa Study Anorexia Nervosa Study Anorexia Nervosa Study Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not other wise specified. According to the World of Psychology ano...
  • Women Sport Athlete Injuries Women Sport Athlete Injuries Women Sport Athlete Injuries The number of girls and women participating in all levels of sports has risen greatly in recent years, and the way they play has changed too. Women\'s sports used to be played by a slow defensive style. Today, the sports are played with speed, precision, and power. With these changes have come increased injuries, and female athletes have higher injury rates than men in many sports. Knee injuries have been rising in female sports. Anterior crutiate ligament (ACL) inju...
  • Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia is an eating disorder that usually strikes women between the ages of fifteen and thirty-five. An estimated one thousand females will die each year from anorexia. About eighty percent of females suffer from a sub clinical eating disorder and twenty percent will turn into full-blown anorexics in their lifetime. These are statistics that we know of. Anorexia can be hidden very well by many that suffer from it; therefore there are many cases we do not know of. Anorexia is a...
  • Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, is a chronic illness this means that it has no cure and the symptoms persist over a long period of time. This illness is a result of an imbalance of hormones, insulin, produced in the pancreas. Insulin plays an important role in how the body uses food. Insulin enables the cells in the bloodstream to absorb and use glucose for fuel. If the pancreas produces too little or no insulin or if the insulin doesnt work properly the person may become diabe...