Gombe Stream National Park


Find More Gombe Stream National Park

Looking for essays on gombe stream national park? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

gombe stream national park Jane Goodall




Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has.
As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane's childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957.
Only a few months after her arrival 23 year old Jane met Dr. Louis Leakey. Even though Jane had no academic credentials, Leakey chose her to conduct a long-term study of the chimpanzees in Tasmania's Gombe National Park. Even though Dr. Leakey's decision was frowned upon by many, he believed that Goodall's patience, independence and persistence to understand animals made her a good candidate for the job. He also believed that Jane's mind; "uncluttered by academia"  would yield a fresh perspective. Even though her research contract was intended for the period of 10 years, critics believe she would last no longer than three weeks. By 1962 Jane Goodall had proved them wrong when her research was advancing greatly. It was around this time that National Geographic sent photographer and filmmaker Hugo van Lawick to document her work. The two were married in Tasmania on March 28, 1964. By 1965 Jane earned her Ph. D in ethnology, the eight person in the history of Cambridge University to earn a doctorate without first taking a B.A. Not long after Jane returned to the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve on Lake Tanganyika, Tasmania.
For nearly 10 years Jane studied chimpanzees. Her profound scientific discoveries laid the foundation for all future primate studies. Jane's discovery that chimpanzees made and used tools amazed the world. This one ability was once believed to separate humans from animals. A gap which was closed over the years of Jane's research as more and more similarities between humans and chimpanzees were discovered, "Chimpanzees and humans differ by only just over one per cent."  "I watched, amazed, as she (Lucy, a chimpanzee) opened the refrigerator and various cupboards, found bottles and a glass, then poured herself a gin and tonic" . Jane recorded this experience and many other discoveries in her three books; In the Shadow of Man (1971) a book documenting the life of chimpanzees, Innocent Killers (1971) about spotted hyenas, whose predatory behavior had been wrongly researched. And also, Through a Window (1990) a book about her life and experiences living with the chimps.
In 1977 Goodall founded The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education and Conservation. She has also established chimpanzee sanctuaries for the care and rehabilitation of orphaned chimpanzees in four African countries. In 1995 she received the National Geographic Society's prestigious Hubbard Medal. The National Geographic supported Jane's research between 1961 and 1978; she was the recipient of 26 grants.
Through her best-selling books, articles, lectures, and National Geographic programs, Jane Goodall has become world famous. Today she still lives in Tasmania, where the research at Gombe is entering its 40th year. She devotes all her time and energy into teaching young people about conservation. Jane has made many accomplishments, and experienced things only some people could ever dream of. She is a great role model and has changed the way people view chimpanzees.
"Africa, the birth of humankind, provides a
disturbing clue to our future. As I fly across
areas that were forest just years ago and see
them becoming dessert, I worry. Too many
people crowd this continent, so poor they strip
the land for food and fuel-wood. The subject
of my life's work and our closest living relative,
the chimpanzees and gorillas are slaughtered
for food or captured for the live-animal trade.
Pollution of air, land and water abounds.
Are we destroying our beautiful planet?"



Bibliography: ... more

gombe stream national park

Research on Gombe Stream National Park

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Gombe Stream National Park" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Gombe Stream National Park essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Gombe Stream National Park and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Gombe Stream National Park

Find essay on Gombe Stream National Park

Human Evolution

                              Human Evolution: the water theory.
                                        Elaine Morgan
The crucial question about human evolution is why humans differ so strikingly from the African apesdespite their close genetic
relationship. Most Darwinists would agree that such differences are usually attributable to differing environmental pressures; and hence
that our ancestors at some stage probably  occupied a significantly different habitat from the ancestor of the gorilla and the chimpanzee.
For the last half-century it has been generally assumed that it was a much drier habitat.
Alister Hardy's suggestion in 1960 that it might have been a much wetter one was intuitively and almost unanimously rejected. Primates
were said to have an innate fear of water which many humans share, and the fossils of early hominids were found far inland, in arid sites
on the African plains. Above all . Hardy's  ideas were felt to be unnecessary. There was a tacit assumption that the main ape/human
differences had been adequately accounted for in terms of a move by some populations of the last common ancestor from the forest to the
savanna, and that any details still unexplained were well on the way to being solved.
That was a misconception. Consensus on the reasons for the emergence of the most salient distinguishing features of Homo - such as
bipedalism, loss of body hair, subcutaneous fat, and the power of speech - is no nearer today than it was in Darwin's lifetime.
Humans are so accustomed to erect locomotion that it takes a specialist to appreciate what a bizarre and costly adaptation it was. Owen
Lovejoy commented: " "For any quadruped to get upon its hind legs in order to run is an insane thing to do. It's plain ridiculous." As a gait
it is far more unstable than quadrupedalism; it takes very much longer to learn, greatly extending the period when the female is burdened
with the task of carrying the infant; it is a deplorably ineffective defence posture, exposing the most vulnerable organs of the body to the
risk of damage or evisceration; unlike in quadrupeds damage to one leg or foot can be crippling rather than a temporary inconvenience. For
bipedalism to become as efficient as it is today required extensive remodelling of the body, affecting the cranium, spine, pelvis, legs, feet,
and consequent adaptations in the muscles and other organs. After five million years of these modifications, the spine is still the first organ
in our bodies to deteriorate due to wear and tear, and bipedalism is the direct cause of vascular disorders such as varicose veins and
haemorrhoids, and of obstetric disorders that throughout most of history have been life-threatening.
In any cost/benefit analysis the advantages of erect locomotion must have been very great to outweigh these drawbacks. The aquatic model
suggests that in a flooded habitat, bipedalism may have been resorted to under duress, the significant reward being the ability to breathe
air. In terms of the savanna scenario the suggested benefits have been many and varied and no explanation has carried conviction for long.
At first bipedalism was depicted as an improved method of covering long distances . But running on two legs is slower than on four, and
consumes no less energy. It is true that at walking speeds a modern human consumes less energy than a chimpanzee, but it must have been
millions of years before this benefit accrued. In one experiment, a human volunteer constrained by an orthopsis to adopt the
bent-knee-bent-hip gait practised by the early hominids used twice as much energy as we do today.
Theories based on possible non-locomotor advantages have regularly been advanced and as regularly discarded. Sentinel behaviour was
once a favourite hypothesis since many species stand erect to scan the horizon; however in non-human species this never develops from
postural to locomotor bipedalism. A weapon-bearing scenario lost ground when bipedalism was found to have preceded any indication of
the use of weapons. A food-carrying theory based on pair-bonding in the interests of the slow-developing young was weakened by the
discovery that the slow-down of development post-dated the advent of bipedalism. A thermoregulatory hypothesis suggesting that erect
posture lessened the sun's mid-day heat load on a savanna primate became less credible once it was accepted that bipedalism preceded the
emergence of savanna conditions. Picking fruit from low bushes has been observed to induce chimpanzees to stand up on two legs - but not
to ... more

gombe stream national park

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • G: Jane goodall G: Jane goodall jane goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957. Only a few ...
  • O: Jane Goodall O: Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957. Only a few ...
  • M: Human Evolution M: Human Evolution Human Evolution Human Evolution: the water theory. Elaine Morgan The crucial question about human evolution is why humans differ so strikingly from the African apesdespite their close genetic relationship. Most Darwinists would agree that such differences are usually attributable to differing environmental pressures; and hence that our ancestors at some stage probably occupied a significantly different habitat from the ancestor of the gorilla and the chimpanzee. For the last half-century it has ...
  • B: Jane Goodall B: Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957...
  • E: Jane goodall E: Jane goodall jane goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957. Only a few ...
  •  : Jane Goodall : Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957. Only a few ...
  • S: Human Evolution S: Human Evolution Human Evolution Human Evolution: the water theory. Elaine Morgan The crucial question about human evolution is why humans differ so strikingly from the African apesdespite their close genetic relationship. Most Darwinists would agree that such differences are usually attributable to differing environmental pressures; and hence that our ancestors at some stage probably occupied a significantly different habitat from the ancestor of the gorilla and the chimpanzee. For the last half-century it has ...
  • T: Jane Goodall T: Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane\'s childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957...