Glasgow


Find More Glasgow

Looking for essays on glasgow? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

glasgow Sir William Wallace

When the king of Scotland
died without an heir to the throne the nephew of the king also the king of
England nicknamed Edward the Longshanks (Edward I) took the throne for himself
and complete control of Scotland.                                        
                                                                       

        William WallWhen the king of Scotland died without an heir to the
throne the nephew of the king also the king of England nicknamed Edward the
Longshanks (Edward I) took the throne for himself and complete control of Scotland.
                                                                         
                                     
         William Wallace was Born
in January of the year 1272. He was the second of three sons. He was born in
the town of Elerslie, which was in Scotland. His Father Sir Malcolm Wallace
held the title of knight but had little to no political power. Wallace's Father
was involved in a revolt called Turnberry Band when William was 14 years old
and was sent to live with his uncle Argile.  His Uncle taught William Latin
and French and how to be a swordsmen.When William's father returned from the
revolt at Turnberry Band  William was 17 years old. Fighting between rival
families and rival towns were heating up.  Civil War was about to Break out
in Scotland. Brawling and riots inside towns turned into full scale battles,
Where in the Battle of  Loudoun Hill William's father was involved and killed.
William Stayed with his mother For two years until he met Murron Braidfoot
and married her in the year 1272. There are many tales on how William Wallace
became and outlaw after his marrige, one such is that one day Wil
liam was
fishing at a near by lake when a group of english soilders approached him and
demanded william give them the fish he had caught. William trying to get food
for himself and his wife said they could only take half. The soilders enraged
lunged at William. But William fought off and killed both of the guards, forever
becoming an outlaw. In The month of may 1272 A group of english soilders under
the command of The English Sheriff of Lanark, William de Hazelrig ordered the
death of William's wife. It seems that William had already started his revolt
against England when his wife was murdered in an attempt to arrest Wallace.
Wallace's huge act of rebellion attracted the attention of common folk and
Scots nobles alike, all of whom were unwilling to bear Edward the Longshanks
laws.
Rebelion forces under William Wallace were scattered all over scotland
but they all submerged together and met a larger more equipped english army
at the Battle of Stirling. The Battle of Stirling happened a little differently
than portrayed in the film Braveheart. On September 11, 1297, The English forces
were arrayed around Stirling Castle, while the Scots were opposite them across
the forth, which wound through a valley. All that seperated the two armies
was a bridge across the forth. Because of poor commanding by the English leaders,
The english were trapped as they crossed the bridge and were slaughtered by
the Scots.
In March of 1298 Wallace was Knighted by the scottish noble man
Robert the bruce and was appointed guardian of Scotland.
Edward I finally
headed for Scotland with his army in July of 1298 Sadly the english army was
much larger than the Scots and despite Wallace's best efforts the english decimated
the Scots at the battle of Falkirk. Wallace himself barely escaped and Some
historians do belive that Robert the bruce helped Wallace escape from english
soilders.
After Scotland's loss at Falkirk Wallace resignes as guardian of
Scotland, no one knows what Wallace did for the next 3 years But some belive
he led mild raids into england which only enraged King Edward I more. Many
belive that someone betrayed Wallace at his capture near Glasgow by english
forces where he was immiediatly sent to london to be executed for treason.
The Sentance was immiediatly carried out Wallace was wrapped in oxhide and
dragged several miles to Smithfield. Where he was hanged until almost unconscious
and then tied two a table and disemboweled where the english set his entrails
on fire while still attached to his body, he was possibly castrated as well
and then beheaded.  


... more

glasgow

Research on Glasgow

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Glasgow" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Glasgow essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Glasgow and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Glasgow

Find essay on Glasgow

Steam Engines
The Steam Engine

The steam engine provided a landmark in the industrial development of Europe. The first modern steam engine was built by an engineer, Thomas Newcomen, in 1705 to improve the pumping equipment used to eliminate seepage in tin and copper mines. Newcomen's idea was to put a vertical piston and cylinder at the end of a pump handle. He put steam in the cylinder and then condensed it with a spray of cold water; the vacuum created allowed atmospheric pressure to push the piston down. In 1763 James watt, an instrument-maker for Glasgow University, began to make improvements on Newcomen's engine. He made it a reciprocating engine, thus changing it from an atmospheric to a true "steam engine." He also added a crank and flywheel to provide rotary motion.

In 1774 the industrialist Michael Boulton took Watt into partnership, and their firm produced nearly five hundred engines before Watt's patent expired in 1800. Water power continued in use, but the factory was now liberated from the streamside. A Watt engine drove Robert Fulton's experimental steam vessel Clermont up the Hudson in 1807.

Railroads

The coming of the railroads greatly facilitated the industrialization of Europe. At mid.eighteenth century the plate or rail track had been in common use for moving coal from the pithead to the colliery or furnace. After 1800 flat tracks were in use outside London, Sheffield, and Munich. With the expansion of commerce, facilities for the movement of goods from the factory to the ports or cities came into pressing demand. In 1801 Richard Trevithick had an engine pulling trucks around the mine where he worked in Cornwall. By 1830 a railway was opened from Liverpool to Manchester; and on this line George Stephenson's ''Rocket'' pulled a train of cars at fourteen miles an hour.

The big railway boom in Britain came in the years 1844 to 1847. The railway builders had to fight vested interests-for example, canal stockholders, turnpike trusts, and horse breeders-but by 1850, aided by cheap iron and better machine tools, a network of railways had been built. By midcentury railroad trains travelling at thirty to fifty miles an hour were not uncommon, and freight steadily became more important than passengers. After 1850 in England the state had to intervene to regulate what amounted to a monopoly of inland transport. But as time went on the British railways developed problems. The First World War (1914-1918) found them suffering from overcapitalization, rising costs, and state regulation.

British success with steam locomotion, however, was enough to encourage the building of railroads in most European countries, often with British capital, equipment, and technicians. Railroads became a standard item of British export. After 1842 France began a railroad system which combined private and public enterprise. The government provided the roadbed and then leased it to a private company which provided the equipment. In Russia, Canada, and the United States, railways served to link communities separated by vast distances. In Germany there were no vast empty spaces, but railroads did help to affect political and economic integration.Words
             / Pages : 504 / 24 ... more

glasgow

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • G: Battle of vicksburg G: Battle of vicksburg Battle of vicksburg Battle of vicksburg The Vicksburg Campaign was one of the most decisive campaigns of the Civil War and also one of the greatest campaigns in history. Vicksburg, Mississippi, perched upon a steep bluff along the east bank of the Mississippi River was of strategic importance to the north and south. The opening of the Mississippi River to Northern shipping was of prime importance to the Union. It would help them move troops from camp to camp, divide the confederacy down the midd...
  • L: Sir William Wallace L: Sir William Wallace Sir William Wallace When the king of Scotland died without an heir to the throne the nephew of the king also the king of England nicknamed Edward the Longshanks (Edward I) took the throne for himself and complete control of Scotland. William WallWhen the king of Scotland died without an heir to the throne the nephew of the king also the king of England nicknamed Edward the Longshanks (Edward I) took the throne for himself and complete control of Scotland. William Wallace was Born in January of t...
  • A: Steam Engines A: Steam Engines Steam Engines The Steam Engine The steam engine provided a landmark in the industrial development of Europe. The first modern steam engine was built by an engineer, Thomas Newcomen, in 1705 to improve the pumping equipment used to eliminate seepage in tin and copper mines. Newcomen\'s idea was to put a vertical piston and cylinder at the end of a pump handle. He put steam in the cylinder and then condensed it with a spray of cold water; the vacuum created allowed atmospheric pressure to push the...
  • S: The City Of Today S: The City Of Today The City Of Today Glorious, glorious England. As the Empire spreads some say so does its glory ; others mumble of the price which we pay for our greatness. Many of us Londoners have read, if not discussed, the intriguing debate transpiring between Sir Andrew Ure and Sir James Phillips Kay. Are the cities of great England truly representative of the jewels in Her Majesty\'s Crown? Or are they the stain of exploitation and abuse that some have proclaimed? Sir James Phillips Kay, an M.D. at Edinbur...
  • G: The internet G: The internet The internet The internet: The Internet is, quite literally, a network of networks. It is comprised of ten thousands of interconnected networks spanning the globe. The computers that form the Internet range from huge mainframes in research establishments to modest PCs in people's homes and offices. -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- [Category]: Technology [Paper Title]: The internet [Text]: The Internet: its effects and its future Essay written by Eva Kot...
  • O: Lord Kelvin (1824 - 1907) O: Lord Kelvin (1824 - 1907) Lord Kelvin (1824 - 1907) William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) was born June 26, 1824 in Belfast, Ireland, and was part of a large family whose mother died when he was six. His father taught Kelvin and his brothers mathematics to a level beyond that of university courses of the time. Kelvin was somewhat of a genius, and had his first papers published in 1840. These papers contained an argument defending the work of Fourier (Fourier transforms), which at the time was being heavily criticized by Br...
  • W: In-service W: In-service In-service and Student Enhancement Program: An in-service program will be developed to train all teachers in the grading guidelines for the State Writing Assessment. Teachers will be train in the grading of essays according to the General Grading Rubric developed by the State. Additionally, teachers will be helped to incorporate writing into their curriculums. On the student side, an assessment of current writing skills will be given to all 10th graders. -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-...
  • Laissezfaire1 Laissezfaire1 Laissezfaire1 Concept of the Invisible Hand in a Laissez-faire economy By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of it. Adam Smith, Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations 1776. What business ...
  • Adam Smith Adam Smith Adam Smith Adam Smith, a brilliant eighteenth-century Scottish political economist, had the advantage of judging the significance ol colonies by a rigorous examination based on the colonial experience of 300 years. His overview has a built-in bias: he strongly disapproved of excessive regulation of colonial trade by parent countries. But his analysis is rich with insight and remarkably dispassionate in its argument. Adam Smith recognized that the discovery of the New World not only brought wealt...
  • No title No title Tobias George Smollett Tobias George Smollett (1721-1771), Scottish novelist, was born in Dalquhurn, Dumbarton County Scotland. Smollett was born beneath a plane tree at Dalquharn House on the family estate of Bon hill in the Vale of Leven, near the village of Renton, Dumbartonshire. At fourteen Smollett was apprenticed to a Glasgow doctor. He studied medicine at Glasgow University and moved to London in 1740. He was a ship\'s surgeon in the Carragena expedition against the Spanish in the West I...
  • Concept of the Invisible Hand in a Laissez-faire e Concept of the Invisible Hand in a Laissez-faire e Concept of the Invisible Hand in a Laissez-faire economy By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of it. Adam Smith, Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations 1776. What business does a governm...
  • Global warming Global warming Global warming Throughout the world, the presence of particular diseases and other threats to human health depend largely on the local climate. Extreme variation in temperature can directly, and indirectly, cause the loss of human life. The threat of a gradual increase in temperature could be catastrophic to the world, as we know it. As recently as 1999, a heat wave killed more than 250 people in Chicago alone (Union of Concerned Scientists). Many right off such an event as a natural disaster. H...
  • Calvin Klein Product Launch Calvin Klein Product Launch Calvin Klein Product Launch XTACY The Power of All Senses The New Fragrance From Calvin Klein Seher Farooq Contents 1.0 Executive Summary 3 2.0 Terms of Reference 4 3.0 Introduction 5 4.0 Situation Analysis 4.1 Market/ Industry Analysis 7 4.2 PEST Analysis 8 4.3 SWOT Analysis 13 4.4 Market Opportunities 16 5.0 Marketing Strategy 5.1 Marketing Objectives 18 5.2 Market Segmentation and Targeting 19 5.3 Market Positioning 19 6.0 Marketing Action Plan 6.1 Product 25 6.2 Place 25 6.3 Price 26 6.4...
  • Affective Gaming Affective Gaming Affective Gaming Shigeru Miyamoto, the father of the Mario and Zelda franchises, tells us that he designs his games around a series of specific emotional experiences. Console manufacturer Sony have christened the PlayStation 2\'s CPU the emotion engine\'. Clearly the gaming community understands the importance of emotion in games, so why do most games offer the player such a shallow emotional play experience? The reason is partly due to the relative immaturity of the games industry. Whereas t...
  • Pragmatics Deixis And Conversational Implicature Pragmatics Deixis And Conversational Implicature Pragmatics Deixis And Conversational Implicature 1.1 #9;The concept of deictic centre Deixis deals with the words and expressions whose reference relies entirely on the circumstances of the utterance. For that reason these special expressions and their meaning in discourse can only be understood in light of these circumstances. The term deictic centre underlines that the deictic term has to relate to the situation exactly at the point where the utterance is made or the text is written. One could...
  • Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie A man of Scotland, a distinguished citizen of the United States, and a philanthropist devoted to the betterment of the world around him, Andrew Carnegie became famous at the turn of the twentieth century and became a real life rags to riches story. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on November 25, 1835, Andrew Carnegie entered the world in poverty. The son of a hand weaver, Carnegie received his only formal education during the short time between his birth and his move to the United...
  • Bunker Hill Bunker Hill Bunker Hill The battle on Breeds Hill, wrongly named the Battle of Bunker Hill, changed the course of the American Revolution. This battle was the first large-scale engagement and also one of the bloodiest battles of the American Revolution. It was held on June 17, 1775 in Charlestown (now part of Boston), Massachusetts. The prior battle to this one would be the at Lexington and Concorde which sort of started it all. This battle took place April 19, 1775. After the battle at Concorde British tr...
  • Ancient Egyptian Religion as S Ancient Egyptian Religion as S Ancient Egyptian Religion as S Ancient Egyptian Religion as Seen in Art and Architecture As the hot Egyptian sun beats down upon his head, the archeologist realizes his time is drawing to a close. The local government had allotted a period of two weeks for the expedition to take place, and the thirteenth day is now in its peak. The search for the tomb of the great king Menes has, thus far, been a complete failure. The archeologist begins to feel a bit queasy, realizing his sudden failure; howeve...
  • In the History of the world, human race, there hav In the History of the world, human race, there hav ww2 In the History of the world, human race, there have been many wars between different societies, Cultures, and Countries. Massive blood shed in many of these wars did not stop the coming of new conflicts of interest, peaking to battle. World War Two, one of the biggest war of history brought several countries to battle against each other (1939-1945). The catalyst of this war was one man whom discriminated against other cultures for no reason but to exterminate the Jewish race, known as Adolf ...
  • The internet its effects and its future The internet its effects and its future The internet its effects and its future Internet, its effects in our lives and the future of the Internet: The Internet is, quite literally, a network of networks. It is comprised of ten thousands of interconnected networks spanning the globe. The computers that form the Internet range from huge mainframes in research establishments to modest PCs in peoples homes and offices. Despite the recent hype, the Internet is not a new phenomenon. Its roots lie in a collection of computers that were lin...
  • Internet5 Internet5 internet5 The Internet: its effects and its future Internet, its effects in our lives and the future of the Internet: The Internet is, quite literally, a network of networks. It is comprised of ten thousands of interconnected networks spanning the globe. The computers that form the Internet range from huge mainframes in research establishments to modest PCs in people\'s homes and offices. Despite the recent hype, the Internet is not a new phenomenon. Its roots lie in a collection of computers th...
  • Industrial Revolution Industrial Revolution Industrial Revolution By: Jeff Ogden E-mail: revv@cia-agent.com Prior to the 18th century, in the United States and Western Europe, the majority of the population lived on farms. However, during the 1700s many remarkable new innovations came into being which caused an upheaval of sorts. New forms of power, such as steam, replaced animal strength and human muscle. The factory system of making goods came into use. All of these advances affected patterns of living as well as working. Because soci...
  • British Stereotypes in America British Stereotypes in America British Stereotypes in America Lets face it, in The United States, we do not understand cricket, we do not understand tea, and we certainly do not understand hidden emotions. Of course there is more to Britain than these cultural icons, just like America is not just made of cowboys from Dallas and loud egotistic tourists. However in the year 2000, there are still several myths surrounding the British culture that are very much alive today. Many people in the U.S. and I am sure many other coun...
  • The Human Eye In Space The Human Eye In Space The Human Eye In Space Human visual hardware is a result of a billion years of evolution within the earths atmosphere where light is scattered by molecules of air, moisture, particular matter etc. However as we ascend into our atmosphere with decrease density, light distribution is changed resulting in our visual hardware receiving visual data in different format. Some Aspects to Consider: 1. Visual acuity is the degree to which the details and contours of objects are perceived. Visual acuity is...
  • No title No title Poor and backward or Wealthy and developing: Which of these descriptors most accurately portrays Poor and backward or Wealthy and developing: Which of these descriptors most accurately portrays Britain in 1750? Britain in 1750 could be described as either, poor and backward or wealthy and developing as there are any number of points to support each side of the argument. To set the scene of Britain in 1750, the population was approximately 6 million. The South East and London were t...