Frederick William I


Find More Frederick William I

Looking for essays on frederick william i? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

frederick william i Robert E Lee




Lee, Robert E. (Edward) 1807 -- 1870
General in chief of the Confederate armies in the American Civil War. Born in Virginia's Westmoreland County on January 19, 1807, the third son of Henry ("Light Horse Harry") and Ann Hill Carter Lee. Declining fortunes forced the family's removal to Alexandria, where Robert distinguished himself in local schools. His father's death in 1811 increased responsibilities on all the sons; Robert, especially, cared for his invalid mother.
Lee graduated number two in his class from the U.S. Military Academy in 1829. Commissioned a brevet lieutenant of engineers, he spent a few years at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, and Fort Monroe, Virginia. At Fort Monroe on June 30, 1831, he married Mary Ann Randolph Custis, with whom he had seven children. Lee worked in the chief engineer's office in Washington, D.C., from 1834 to 1837. He was transferred to Fort Hamilton, New York, where he remained until 1846.
In August 1846 Lee joined General John E. Wool's army in Texas. In the battle of Buena Vista, Lee's boldness drew his superiors' attention. Transferred to General Winfield Scott's Veracruz expedition, in the battle at Veracruz and in the advance on Mexico he won additional acclaim. Following American occupation of the Mexican capital, he worked on maps for possible future campaigns. Already a captain in the regular service, he was made brevet colonel for his gallantry in the war. Lee returned to engineer duty at Baltimore's Fort Carroll until 1852, when he reluctantly became superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point. In 1855 he was made lieutenant colonel of the 2nd Cavalry, one of the Army's elite units.
The years 1857-1859 were bleak. Lee had to take several furloughs to deal with family business and seriously thought of resigning his commission. However, in 1859 he and his men successfully put down John Brown's insurrection at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. In 1860 he became commander of the Department of Texas.
Talk of secession in the South grew strident during Lee's Texas sojourn. No secessionist, he was loyal to the Union and the U.S. Army; yet he had no doubts about his loyalties if Virginia departed the Union. Ties of blood bound him to the South. Lee accepted a commission as colonel of the 1st U.S. Cavalry in March 1861. But offered command of the entire U.S. Army a month later, he hesitated. If he accepted, he might have to lead the Federal Army against Southern states and, if Virginia seceded, he might have to lead troops across its borders. He could do neither. Painfully, Lee resigned his army commission in April 1861.
Appointed commander of Virginia forces, Lee devoted himself to building an effective state army. He was so efficient that the new president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, asked him to become a full general in the Confederate Army and serve as presidential military adviser. The Confederate Senate confirmed this appointment.
A bad brush with field command in western Virginia-in a campaign marked by military rivalries, lack of supplies, wretched weather, and overly ambitious strategy on Lee's part-tarnished the new general's reputation. Davis still regarded him highly and sent him to organize southern Atlantic coastal defenses. Lee pursued this task efficiently until recalled to the Confederate capital, Richmond. In his role as presidential adviser, he tried to smooth the abrasive personalities of Davis and General Joseph E. Johnston and to utilize the daring of General Stonewall Jackson to frustrate Federal plans for sending aid to General George B. McClellan's army, which was approaching Richmond.
When Johnston was wounded in May 1862, Davis gave Lee command of Johnston's army. Lee renamed his force the "Army of Northern Virginia." The new commander looked the part: 5 feet 10 1/2 inches tall, robust at 170 pounds, Lee had graceful, almost classic features. He attracted men and women alike, was easy in manner, courteous and kind as a friend, and was a loving husband and father.
Though Lee's was the largest Confederate army in the field, it was outnumbered almost three to two by McClellan's Federal Army of the Potomac, which was preparing for siege operations on Richmond. While Lee struggled to fortify Richmond, he and Jackson planned a daring ... more

frederick william i

Research on Frederick William I

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Frederick William I" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Frederick William I essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Frederick William I and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Frederick William I

Find essay on Frederick William I

The Bay of Pigs Invasion

    The story of the failed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs is
one of mismanagement, overconfidence, and lack of security. The
blame for the failure of the operation falls directly in the lap of
the Central Intelligence Agency and a young president and his
advisors. The fall out from the invasion caused a rise in tension
between the two great superpowers and ironically 34 years after the
event, the person that the invasion meant to topple, Fidel Castro,
is still in power. To understand the origins of the invasion and
its ramifications for the future it is first necessary to look at
the invasion and its origins.

Part I: The Invasion and its Origins.
    The Bay of Pigs invasion of April 1961, started a few days
before on April 15th with the bombing of Cuba by what appeared to
be defecting Cuban air force pilots. At 6 a.m. in the morning of
that Saturday, three Cuban military bases were bombed by B-26
bombers. The airfields at Camp Libertad, San Antonio de los Baos
and Antonio Maceo airport at Santiago de Cuba were fired upon.
Seven people were killed at Libertad and forty-seven people were
killed at other sites on the island.
    Two of the B-26s left Cuba and flew to Miami, apparently to
defect to the United States. The Cuban Revolutionary Council, the
government in exile, in New York City released a statement saying
that the bombings in Cuba were ". . . carried out by 'Cubans inside
Cuba' who were 'in contact with' the top command of the
Revolutionary Council . . . ." The New York Times reporter
covering the story alluded to something being wrong with the whole
situation when he wondered how the council knew the pilots were
coming if the pilots had only decided to leave Cuba on Thursday
after " . . . a suspected betrayal by a fellow pilot had
precipitated a plot to strike . . . ." Whatever the case, the
planes came down in Miami later that morning, one landed at Key
West Naval Air Station at 7:00 a.m. and the other at Miami
International Airport at 8:20 a.m. Both planes were badly damaged
and their tanks were nearly empty. On the front page of The New
York Times the next day, a picture of one of the B-26s was shown
along with a picture of one of the pilots cloaked in a baseball hat
and hiding behind dark sunglasses, his name was withheld. A sense
of conspiracy was even at this early stage beginning to envelope
the events of that week.
    In the early hours of April 17th the assault on the Bay of
Pigs began. In the true cloak and dagger spirit of a movie, the
assault began at 2 a.m. with a team of frogmen going ashore with
orders to set up landing lights to indicate to the main assault
force the precise location of their objectives, as well as to clear
the area of anything that may impede the main landing teams to be
added when they arrived. At 2:30 a.m. and at 3:00 a.m. two battalions
came ashore at Playa Girn and one battalion at Playa Larga beaches.
The troops at Playa Girn had orders to move west, northwest, up the
coast and meet with the troops at Playa Larga in the middle of the
bay. A small group of men were then to be sent north to the town of
Jaguey Grande to secure it as well.
    When looking at a modern map of Cuba it is obvious that the
troops would have problems in the area that was chosen for them to
land at. The area around the Bay of Pigs is a swampy marsh land
area which would be hard on the troops. The Cuban forces were quick
to react and Castro ordered his T-33 trainer jets, two Sea Furies,
and two B-26s into the air to stop the invading forces. Off the
coast was the command and control ship and another vessel carrying
supplies for the invading forces. The Cuban air force made quick
work of the supply ships, sinking the command vessel the Marsopa
and the supply ship the Houston, blasting them to pieces with five-
inch rockets. In the end the 5th battalion was lost, which was on
the Houston, as well as the supplies for the landing teams and
eight other smaller vessels. With some of the invading forces'
ships destroyed, and no command and ... more

frederick william i

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • F: Armadeus F: Armadeus Armadeus Absolute monarchy or absolutism meant that the sovereign power or ultimate authority in the state rested in the hands of a king who claimed to rule by divine right. But what did sovereignty mean? Late sixteenth century political theorists believed that sovereign power consisted of the authority to make laws, tax, administer justice, control the state\'s administrative system, and determine foreign policy. These powers made a ruler sovereign. One of the chief theorists of divine-right mo...
  • R: Robert E Lee R: Robert E Lee Robert E Lee Lee, Robert E. (Edward) 1807 -- 1870 General in chief of the Confederate armies in the American Civil War. Born in Virginia\'s Westmoreland County on January 19, 1807, the third son of Henry (Light Horse Harry) and Ann Hill Carter Lee. Declining fortunes forced the family\'s removal to Alexandria, where Robert distinguished himself in local schools. His father\'s death in 1811 increased responsibilities on all the sons; Robert, especially, cared for his invalid mother. Lee graduat...
  • E: The Bay of Pigs Invasion E: The Bay of Pigs Invasion The Bay of Pigs Invasion The story of the failed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs is one of mismanagement, overconfidence, and lack of security. The blame for the failure of the operation falls directly in the lap of the Central Intelligence Agency and a young president and his advisors. The fall out from the invasion caused a rise in tension between the two great superpowers and ironically 34 years after the event, the person that the invasion meant to topple, Fidel Castro, is still in power...
  • D: Nicholas Ferrar D: Nicholas Ferrar Nicholas Ferrar Nicholas Ferrar was assumed to be born in 1592. I have found that his most probable birth date was in February of 1593. This is due to the usual calendar confusion: England was not at that time using the new calendar adopted in October 1582. It was 1593 according to our modern calendar, but at the time the new year in England began on the following March 25th. Nicholas Ferrar was one of the more interesting figures in English history. His family was quite wealthy and were heavily...
  • E: The Effects Of Motivation On Performance E: The Effects Of Motivation On Performance The Effects Of Motivation On Performance Findings Task 2- Write a Report on the effects of Motivation on Performance Research peoples attitude to work and factors affecting their motivation by constructing a questionnaire and conducting a small survey. You should aim to distribute your questionnaire to at least 5 people within your organisation. Gather information on what motivates individual performance and identify attitudes to work by interviewing an employee in-depth and comparing their att...
  • R: Mark Twain Racist Or Realist R: Mark Twain Racist Or Realist Mark Twain Racist Or Realist Mark Twain, Racist or Realist? Introduction This paper examines Mark Twains work to determine whether or not he was racist. Racism is defined by The American Heritage Dictionary as the belief that one race is superior to others. Unfortunately the issue of race isnt black or white. There are many shades of gray in racism and even the most progressive thoughts of old seems conservative as progress enlightens new levels of thought. During his time, Twain was a forward...
  • I: Kate Chopin I: Kate Chopin Kate Chopin Kate Chopin gives a great deal of thought in her literature to issues that she views as important. She was encouraged not to become a useless wife; she was also involved in the idea of becoming an independent woman (LeBlanc 1). Kate Chopin is a well-known American writer. Kate Chopin was born on February 8, 1851, in St. Louis, Missouri. At the age of 53, on August 22, 1904, she died due to cerebral hemorrhage (Hoffman 1-2). Kate is the daughter of Eliza Faris OFlaherty and Thomas ...
  • C: TransContinental Railroad C: TransContinental Railroad TransContinental Railroad If any act symbolized the taming of the Northwest frontier, it was the driving of the final spike to complete the nations first transcontinental railroad.1 The first railroad west of the Mississippi River was opened on December 23, 1852. Five miles long, the track ran from St. Louis to Cheltanham, Missouri. Twenty-five years prior, there were no railroads in the United States; twenty-five years later, railroads joined the east and west coasts from New York to San Fra...
  • K: Matthew B. Brady K: Matthew B. Brady Matthew B. Brady Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer was written by Elizabeth Van Steenwyk. Elizabeth Van Steenwyk has written many good books for young people including: Saddlebag Salesmen, The California Missions, Frederic Remington, The California Gold Rush: West with the Forty-Niners, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett: Woman of Courage. Elizabeth now lives in San Marino, California with her husband. Mathew B. Brady was born somewhere between 1823 and 1824. ...
  •  : Paper Technology : Paper Technology Paper Technology Leadership and Motiviation 1. Introduction and Definition 2. Leadership Types a. Natural born leader b. Developed leader 3. Leadership Models a. Traditional b. Non-traditional 4. Leadership Traits a. Make people feel important b. Promote your vision c. Treat others as you want to be treated d. Take responsibility for your actions 5. Motivational Theories a. Classical Theory and Scientific Management b. Behavior theory c. Contemporary Motivational Theories ***********************...
  • W: The concept of earning ones citizenship W: The concept of earning ones citizenship The concept of earning ones citizenship The Concept of Earning One\'s Citizenship Citizenship is defined as a being a citizen or a person owing allegiance to and entitled to the protection of a sovereign state. Citizen preferred for one owing allegiance to a state in which sovereign power is retained by the people and sharing in the political rights of those people. The concept of which in one of its earliest was given to us by the Romans, who had just began to understand the importance of a pop...
  • I: victims of jack the ripper I: victims of jack the ripper victims of jack the ripper The Victims of Jack the Ripper Jack the Ripper is remembered as one of historys most famous, daring, and heinous serial killers. His technique of getting his victims to lay down before he slashed their throats, then disemboweling them in a matter of a minute or two with as little blood flow as possible distinguishes him as one of the most methodical, ruthless killers to ever live. He even performed some of his gruesome murders right in the street and left his victims ...
  • L: Gender In As You Like It L: Gender In As You Like It Gender In As You Like It Gender in As You Like It Many characters undergo a change in William Shakespeares play, As You Like It. Duke Senior goes from being a member of a court to being a member of a forest. Orlando changes from a bitter younger brother to a love-sick young man. But the most obvious transformation undergone, is done by Rosalind. Her change from woman to man, not only alters her mood, candor, and gender, but allows her to be the master of ceremonies. Celia and Rosalind are f...
  • L: Edgar allan poe1 L: Edgar allan poe1 edgar allan poe1 Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), was an American poet, short-story writer, and literary critic. Poe\'s stormy personal life and his haunting poems and stories combined to make him one of the most famous figures in American literary history. Poe\'s influence on literature has been immense. His short story The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) is considered the first modern detective story. His reviews of American novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne mark him as the first significant theoris...
  • I: None Provided22 I: None Provided22 None Provided22 George Calvert was the first Lord of Baltimore. His oldest son, Cecil Calvert, was the second Lord Baltimore. George Calvert, after a visit to Virginia, petitioned King Charles I of England to grant him permission to colonize the land north of the Potomac. He died in 1632, at age 52, just 66 days before the colony\'s official charter was issued, but his son Cecil Calvert carried out his father\'s dream. Cecil Calvert had the difficult task of planning and carrying out the coloniz...
  • A: The French and Indian War A: The French and Indian War The French and Indian War The French and Indian War The French and Indian war raged from 1754 to 1763. Its roots began long before the first shot was fired, about 100 years before between the French and the English. The French and Indian War was not fought between the French and the Indians, but the two allied with the Canadians against the English. It was the catalyst for the Seven Years War, from 1756-1763, which was brought over into Europe, the Carnatic Wars, and it eventually lead to the Am...
  • M: Daisy miller M: Daisy miller Daisy miller Henry James was born at two Washington Place in New York City on April 15,1843. He was the second son to Henry James, Sr., an independently wealthy intellectual, and Mary Robertson James. From 1843 to 1845, James took his first trip to Europe. He lived in New York City with his family at 58 West 14th Street. James was educated privately by governess and tutors in New York and Albany. In 1855, he traveled to Europe with his family and attended schools in Switzerland and France. In 1...
  •  : Black Leaders Of 20th Century : Black Leaders Of 20th Century Black Leaders Of 20th Century BLACK LEADERS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY In the time after the fall of radical black reconstruction of the nineteenth century, African Americans were being oppressed by rural farming, civil rights, economical advancement and sharecropping. Booker T. Washington charged the fight for economical and political accommodation with his dream of equal civil rights. Timothy Thomas Fortune was an influential black journalist that fought for the rights of African Americans throu...
  • I: The Life of Ulysses S. Grant I: The Life of Ulysses S. Grant The Life of Ulysses S. Grant Grant was the son of a frontier family. He was born Hiram Ulysses Grant in 1822 in a two-room cabin in Point Pleasant in southwestern Ohio, near the Ohio River. His father, Jesse Root Grant, was a tanner. Hannah Simpson Grant, his mother, was a pious, hardworking frontier woman. When Ulysses was one year old, his father moved the family to nearby Georgetown, where the boy grew up and attended school. He later went to nearby Maysville Seminary in Maysville, Kentucky, ...
  • The Enlightenment and the Role of the Philosophes The Enlightenment and the Role of the Philosophes The Enlightenment and the Role of the Philosophes The Enlightenment and the Role of the Philosophes The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called philosophes in France) were committed to secular views based on reason or human un...
  • The Contenders The Contenders The Contenders For the presidential election of 1856, the Democrats nominated James Buchanan and John Breckenridge, the newly formed Republican party nominated John Fremont and William Drayton, the American [or Know-Nothing] party nominated former president Millard Fillmore and Andrew Donelson, and the Abolition Party nominated Gerrit Smith and Samuel McFarland. Buchanan started his political career as a state representative in Pennsylvania, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 18...
  • Only Yesterday Only Yesterday Only Yesterday Only Yesterday Frederick Lewis Allen's book Only Yesterday is an informal look at life in the 1920's. The book begins with a prelude that details the lives of a young married couple. The book then proceeds to tell the events that occurred during the 1920's beginning with the signing of the armistice and ending with the stock market crash of 1929. Woodrow Wilson was the president at the end of WWI. He had the great honor of informing the American public that the armistice was signe...
  • Gender in As You Like It Gender in As You Like It Gender in As You Like It Many characters undergo a change in William Shakespeares play, As You Like It. Duke Senior goes from being a member of a court to being a member of a forest. Orlando changes from a bitter younger brother to a love-sick young man. But the most obvious transformation undergone, is done by Rosalind. Her change from woman to man, not only alters her mood, candor, and gender, but allows her to be the master of ceremonies. Celia and Rosalind are fairly happy in the court of...
  • Transcendentalism was a movement in philosophy, li Transcendentalism was a movement in philosophy, li Transcendentalism was a movement in philosophy, literature, and religion that emerged and was popular in the nineteenth century New England because of a need to redefine man and his place in the world in response to a new and changing society. The industrial revolution, universities, westward expansion, urbanization and immigration all made the life in a city like Boston full of novelty and turbulence. Transcendentalism was a reaction to an impoverishment of religion and mechanization of conscio...
  • Bay Of Pigs Bay Of Pigs Bay Of Pigs The Bay of Pigs Invasion. The story of the failed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs is one of mismanagement, overconfidence, and lack of security. The blame for the failure of the operation falls directly in the lap of the Central Intelligence Agency and a young president and his advisors. The fall out from the invasion caused a rise in tension between the two great superpowers and ironically 34 years after the event, the person that the invasion meant to topple, Fidel Castro, is s...