Flattery


Find More Flattery

Looking for essays on flattery? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

flattery A Dream

A Midsummer Night's Dream By: A. Theseus More strange
than true. I never may believe These antic fables nor these
fairy toys. Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool
reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the
poet Are of imagination all compact. One sees more devils
than vast hell can hold: That is the madman. The lover, all as
frantic Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt. The poet's
eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to
earth, from earth to heaven And as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to
shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a
name. Such tricks hath strong imagination That, if it would
but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of
that joy; Or in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a
bush supposed a bear! (V,i,2-22) Theseus, in Scene V of A
Midsummer Night's Dream, expresses his doubt in the
verisimilitude of the lover's recount of their night in the forest.
He says that he has no faith in the ravings of lovers- or
poets-, as they are as likely as madmen are to be divorced
from reason. Coming, as it does, after the resolution of the
lovers' dilemma, this monologue serves to dismiss most of
the play a hallucinatory imaginings. Theseus is the voice of
reason and authority but, he bows to the resulting change of
affection brought about by the night's confused goings on,
and allows Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius to
marry where their hearts would have them. This place where
the line between dream and reality blurs is an important
theme of the play. Theseus is also a lover, but his affair with
Hippolyta is based upon the cold reality of war, "Hippolyta,
I wooed thee with my sword, And won thy love doing thee
injuries..."(I,i,16-17). He is eager to wed Hippolyta and
marriage is the place where reason and judgement rule. He
wins the hand of his bride through action not through flattery,
kisses and sighs inspired by her beauty. In lines 4-6 of his
monologue he dismisses the accounts of lovers and madmen
on the grounds that they are both apt to imagine a false
reality as being real. When, in I,i,56, Hermia tells Theseus, "I
would my father looked but with my eyes", Theseus
responds, "Rather your eyes must with his judgment
look."(57). Theseus has a firm belief that the eyes of lovers
are not to be trusted. That the eye of the lover "...Sees
Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt..."(11) is, to him, proof of
this. It precisely by enchanting the eyes of the lovers that the
faeries manage to create so much mayhem: "Flower of this
purple dye, hit with cupid's archery, sink in apple of his eye!
When his love he doth espy, let her shine as gloriously as the
Venus of the sky."(III,ii,101-7) Puck doesn't change
Helena's nature, nor does he change her features. When
Lysander wakes, he beholds the same Helena that he's
always despised and suddenly he is enthralled. For Theseus
this is merely caprice and in no means grounded in reality.
Theseus doubts even the existence of the faeries, believing
the lovers have, at a loss to explain the inexplicable changes
of heart they've experienced, dreamed them up: "And as
imagination bodies forth the forms of things unknown, the
poet's pen turns them into shapes and gives to airy nothing a
local habitation and a name."(14-17) A trick of the light, an
abundance of shadows, lack of sleep, an overactive
imagination or any one of these or million other causes are
the most likely explanation. In equating lovers, poets and
lunatics Theseus gets into interesting territory and serves to
elevate lovers while he denounces them. The lunatic "...sees
more devils than vast hell can hold.. while the poet's eye
"...Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to
heaven..."(9-13); thus this same imagination is responsible
for both mad ravings and great art. The concrete reality of
earth co-exists with both heaven and hell as the Faerie world
co-exists with the mortal world. A poet could, just as easily,
be a lunatic depending on the nature of his visions. That
lover's are often (bad) poets, is prime example of this
interchangeability. "Such tricks hath strong imagination, that,
if it would but apprehend a joy, it comprehends some
bringer of that joy; or in the night imagining some fear, how
easy is a bush supposed a bear!"(18-22) Theseus describes
the faulty and incomplete reasoning employed by poets and
lovers ... more

flattery

Research on Flattery

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Flattery" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Flattery essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Flattery and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Flattery

Find essay on Flattery

kiss me kate

As a modern audience, we must remember to be mindful of the society in which Shakespeare wrote The Taming of the Shrew when we analyze it. This was a time when marriages were made for the convenience of the fathers far more often than for a love already existing between the bride and groom; people often were married without having known each other for very long, and sometimes without ever having met. Instead, one hoped to find love within the marriage once it was in place, to learn to love one's partner--there really were no "better" options. It is also doubtful that acting upon "love at first sight," in any society, necessarily brings greater happiness in marriage than does the slowly-developed, consistent love of a married couple who have learned how to live with and for each other. These are the two contrasting relationships that we see in the play, the former between Lucentio and Bianca, and the latter between Petruchio and Kate.

Thus the "ideal" married relationship presented by the play does not concern the "match made in heaven," in which the man and woman are perfectly suited for each other from the beginning. Rather, and much more realistically, it deals with the proper dispositions that a man and woman might arrive at in order to form a more peaceful, if not perfect, union. The question is not whether Petruchio is Italy's most eligible bachelor--certainly, he is at times grossly misogynistic, possessive, and condescending. However, at the beginning of the play, Kate is by disposition Padua's most ineligible maid. After all, as the title suggests, the play is fundamentally about a shrew, and Kate's transformation is its primary dramatic element. So the question becomes, is Petruchio the right man to bring about this transformation, and the answer is a resounding "yes." Only the carefree, persistent, self-assured manner of a man like Petruchio could break through the barriers of words that Kate has put up between herself and marriage.

Furthermore, Kate gradually reveals throughout the play that she does not truly wish for these barriers to remain standing; when Petruchio is late in arriving to the wedding, she fears the loneliness of an old maid far more than the constrictedness of a marriage. It would hardly have done her any good to have married a malleable man who would alway consent to her headstrong will and endure her tongue-lashings, for that marriage could never have been anything but a dichotomy. Though Petruchio stifles and at times humiliates her, the result is that Kate in the end can enjoy her married life, and, as she finally reveals near the end of the play, can love her husband in that life.


The play is about a young woman, Catherine, her sister, Claire, and a young man, Hal, who studied under her father, Robert and their search for the truth about a mathematical proof. The main character, Catherine, is a confused and disturbed young woman who gave up her own dreams to care for her dying father. Catherine has spent the past five years taking care of her mentally ill father, and when he dies her sacrifices are completely under appreciated. Her sister, Claire, wants Catherine to come to New York where she can keep an eye on Catherine.  Then there is Hal who plays Catherine romantic interest. With Hal, Catherine gets a change to claim herself as a mathematician of her fathers statue. The conflict comes when she generates a mathematical proof that might revolutionize mathematics. Yet Claire and Hal do not believe her and question whether she is trying to pass off her fathers work as her own.

John Lee Beatty's back-porch set indicates Robert and Catherine's living space through windows and screen doors. You could fell fall on the stage with a few leaves on the porch and some naked trees of to the side. Pat Collins' lighting is especially effective in the play. To fit the Walter Kerr stage, the porch appears to have been stretched out with neighbors houses on either side.

My personal reaction to this play was a good one. I truly believe that the entire production and the success of this play is dependent on Mary-Louis ... more

flattery

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • F: Hans Christian Andersen F: Hans Christian Andersen Hans Christian Andersen In the course Y2k and The End of The World, we've studied apocalyptic themes, eschatology, and for some, teleology. Apocalypse, which is to unveil or reveal, eschatology, which is a concept of the end, and teleology, the end or purpose to which we are drawn, are all themes used in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. The book is apocalyptic in that it revolves around dystopian ideals. Atwood creates a world in which worst-case scenarios take control and optimistic viewp...
  • L: A Dream L: A Dream A Dream A Midsummer Night\'s Dream By: A. Theseus More strange than true. I never may believe These antic fables nor these fairy toys. Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact. One sees more devils than vast hell can hold: That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic Sees Helen\'s beauty in a brow of Egypt. The poet\'s eye, in a fine frenzy rolli...
  • A: Kiss me kate A: Kiss me kate kiss me kate As a modern audience, we must remember to be mindful of the society in which Shakespeare wrote The Taming of the Shrew when we analyze it. This was a time when marriages were made for the convenience of the fathers far more often than for a love already existing between the bride and groom; people often were married without having known each other for very long, and sometimes without ever having met. Instead, one hoped to find love within the marriage once it was in place, to learn ...
  • T: Ancient greek history T: Ancient greek history ancient greek history Part 1 1a. An epic poem is a long poem that tells a story about heroes. The Iliad is a great epic poem written by Homer in the 8th century BC, reflecting on events that occurred around 1200 BC during the time of the Olympian religion. There were twelve chief gods who supposedly lived in Mount Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece. The twelve Olympian gods were common to all Greeks, who thus shared basic polytheistic religion (Spielvogel 84). The first of the two excerpt...
  • T: King Lear T: King Lear King Lear King Lear King Lear is a play written by William Shakespeare that focuses on the relationships of many characters, some good, some evil. This is a great tragedy that is full of injustice at the beginning and the restoring of justice towards the end. The good are misjudged as evil and the evil are accepted as good. It is not until the end of the play that the righteous people are recognized as such. There is great treachery and deceit involved in the hierarchy of English rule. The great...
  • E: Socrates E: Socrates Socrates Socrates was perhaps the most interesting and influential thinker in the fifth century. He was dedicated to careful reasoning and he wanted genuine knowledge rather than the victory over his opponent. He learned the rhetoric and dialectics of the Sophists, the ideas of the Lonian philosophers, and the general culture of Periclean Athens. Socrates used the same knowledge by the Sophists to get a new purpose, the pursuit of truth. He called everything into question and he was determined t...
  • R: King Lear: Sense Of Renewal R: King Lear: Sense Of Renewal King Lear: Sense Of Renewal King Lear: Sense of Renewal Throughout Shakespeare\'s King Lear, there is a sense of renewal, or as L.C. Knights puts it, affirmation in spite of everything, in the play. These affirmative actions are vividly seen throughout the play that is highly infused with evil, immorality and perverted values. These glimpses of hope seem to provide the reader with an underlying notion of human goodness that remains present, throughout the lurking presence of immorality and a l...
  • Y: King Lear - Bonds Within King Lear Y: King Lear - Bonds Within King Lear King Lear - Bonds Within King Lear The play of King Lear is about a person in search of their own personal identity. In the historical period in which this play is set, the social structure was set in order of things closest to Heaven. Therefore, on Earth, the king was at the top, followed by his noblemen and going all the way down to the basest of objects such as rocks and dirt. This structure was set up by the people, and by going by the premise that anything that is man made is imperfect, thi...
  • King Lear Vs. Glouchester King Lear Vs. Glouchester King Lear Vs. Glouchester Out Of Sight Out Of Mind? In Shakespeare\'s classic tragedy, King Lear, there are several characters who do not see the reality of their environment. Two such characters are Lear and Gloucester. Both characters inhabit a blindness to the world around them. Lear does not see clearly the truth of his daughters mentions, while Gloucester is also blinded by Edmond\'s treachery. This failure to see reality leads to Lears intellectual blindness, which is his insanity, and Glo...
  • Divine Comedy - St.Augustine in Dantes Inferno Divine Comedy - St.Augustine in Dantes Inferno Divine Comedy - St.Augustine in Dantes Inferno Divine Comedy Inferno Essays St.Augustine in the Inferno It is hard to place St. Augustine within just one of the levels of Dantes hell for his sins were varied and not great. Today many of his sins are commonplace. For example, most people attempt to better their own lives without regard of others. They attempt to increase their standard of living and gain more worldly possessions. They are neither good nor evil but are just trying to make a ...
  • Jacob Caswell Jacob Caswell Jacob Caswell 10-21-04 Thursday Evening Intro to Film TAXI DRIVER One small thing that I noticed in the beginning of the movie was when they showed shots of the city through the car's windshield. I saw that it was blurred and there were no windshield wipers used. Immediately it entered my mind that maybe this symbolized Travis's distorted view of the world around him. He was surrounded by a city's crime and sleaze, which later drives him to commit murder. Taxi Driver was one of the most powerf...
  • Aphoristic Dangers of Alexander Pope Aphoristic Dangers of Alexander Pope Aphoristic Dangers of Alexander Pope If imitation is the sincerest flattery, then more than 250 years after his passing Alexander Pope deserves a spot in the ranks as one of the most flattered writers of all time. His works have been dissected of every phrase of possible significance and spilled onto page-a-day calendars and books of wit across the world. The beauty of his catchy maxims is that they are not only memorable, but attempt to convey his philosophy with perfect poetic ingenuity....
  • Canterbury Tales Chaunticleer Canterbury Tales Chaunticleer Canterbury Tales Chaunticleer Canterbury Tales: Chaunticleer In the book Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, gives us a stunning tale about a rooster named Chaunticleer. Chaunticleer, who is the King of his domain in his farmland kingdom. Like a King, he quotes passages from intellectuals, dreams vivid dreams, has a libido that runs like a bat out of hell, and is described as a very elegant looking Rooster. He has every characteristic of a person belonging to the upper class. Chaucer's hidden me...
  • Shit Heas Shit Heas Shit Heas Act 3, Scene 1 Rome. Before the Capitol; the Senate sitting above. [ previous scene ][ home page ][ next scene ] A crowd of people; among them ARTEMIDORUS and the Soothsayer. Flourish. Enter CAESAR, BRUTUS, CASSIUS, CASCA, DECIUS BRUTUS, METELLUS CIMBER, TREBONIUS, CINNA, ANTONY, LEPIDUS, POPILIUS, PUBLIUS, and others CAESAR [To the Soothsayer] The ides of March are come. Soothsayer Ay, Caesar; but not gone. ARTEMIDORUS Hail, Caesar! read this schedule. DECIUS BRUTUS Trebonius doth des...
  • Julius Caesar - Theme Of Friendship Julius Caesar - Theme Of Friendship Julius Caesar - Theme Of Friendship Friendship is a wonderful part of life, but it can unfortunately be used to deceive, for it is easy to manipulate with it, but only true friendship cannot be defeated, even after death. This element could well likely be the very thing that had sealed the fate of Julius Caesar, and Brutus, Cassius, and all the other conspirators knew that they could use this to their advantage, and to Caesar\'s disadvantage. Friendship, was what the conspirators used as a cover...
  • 1. The author states that durability, approximatio 1. The author states that durability, approximatio 1. The author states that durability, approximation of ideals, fulfillment of needs and satisfaction are the criteria used to evaluate whether a marriage is successful or not. I would use compatibility and respect to determine whether a marriage is successful, simply because the more compatible the couple, the easier they can overcome arguments and other obstacles that many couples trip over, leading to divorce. In a marriage if there is respect between both couples the relationship is balanced ...
  • Free Essay: Restructuring Relationships Shakespear Free Essay: Restructuring Relationships Shakespear Free Essay: Restructuring Relationships Shakespeare's King Lear King Lear essays Restructuring Relationships in King Lear The play of King Lear is about a search for personal identity. In the historical period in which this play is set, the social structure was set in order of things closest to Heaven. Therefore, on Earth, the king was at the top, followed by his noblemen and going all the way down to the basest of objects such as rocks and dirt. This structure was set up by the people, and by...
  • Jospeh Andrews Jospeh Andrews Jospeh Andrews Joseph Andrews Joseph Andrews is a novel written in the middle eighteenth century by Henry Fielding. In this novel, Fielding talks of human nature and of the need for control of sexuality. He does not just come right out and say it, but instead expresses his concern through examples of the constant sexual advances through the entire novel, Mr. Wilsons experiences, and the little self control people have in containing themselves properly. The most obvious example of the advances o...
  • Louis XIV Louis XIV Louis XIV Louis XIV Greed is defined in the dictionary as selfish and grasping desire for possession; especially of wealth. It is also described as a noun. This definition can be directly related and best describes Louis XIV, the king of France in the sixteen hundreds. The effects of greed destroying peoples lives can be seen in the beginning of Louis XIV\'s reign, during his reign, and after his reign had ended Louis XIV inherited the throne in 1643 when he was only five (Cairns 103). From the ...
  • Julius Caesar - Theme of Friendship Julius Caesar - Theme of Friendship Julius Caesar - Theme of Friendship Friendship is a wonderful part of life, but it can unfortunately be used to deceive, for it is easy to manipulate with it, but only true friendship cannot be defeated, even after death. This element could well likely be the very thing that had sealed the fate of Julius Caesar, and Brutus, Cassius, and all the other conspirators knew that they could use this to their advantage, and to Caesars disadvantage. Friendship, was what the conspirators used as a cover ...
  • Machiavelli Machiavelli machiavelli Niccolo Machiavelli Statesman and Political Philosopher 1469 - 1527 No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution. Machiavelli from The Art of War I was born on May 3, 1469 in Florence, Italy. I was a political philosopher and diplomat during the Renaissance, and I\'m most famous for my political treatise, The Prince (1513), that has become a cornerstone of modern political philosophy. My life was very interesting. I lived...
  • Chaunticleer Chaunticleer Chaunticleer Chaunticleer: Behind the Rooster In the book Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, gives us a stunning tale about a rooster named Chaunticleer. Chaunticleer, who is the King of his domain in his farmland kingdom. Like a King, he quotes passages from intellectuals, dreams vivid dreams, has a libido that runs like a bat out of hell, and is described as a very elegant looking Rooster. He has every characteristic of a person belonging to the upper class. Chaucer\'s hidden meanings and ide...
  • Gender Identity In Marge Piecys Barbie Doll Gender Identity In Marge Piecys Barbie Doll Gender Identity In Marge Piecy\'s Barbie Doll Gender Identity in Piercys Barbie Doll Dolls often give children their first lessons in what a society considers valuable and beautiful. These dolls often reveal the unremitting pressure to be young, slim, and beautiful in a society which values mainly aesthetics. Marge Piercys Barbie Doll exhibits how a girls childhood is saturated with gender-defined roles and preconceived norms for how one should behave. In order to convey her thoughts, the...
  • Marriage in William Congreves Way of the World Marriage in William Congreves Way of the World Marriage in William Congreves Way of the World Marriage within Congreve\'s Way of the World After Charles II revived theater in 1660, a new kind of comedy, the comedy of manners exploded onto the English drama scene and remained the preferred style of theater for the rest of the century. The aim of these plays was to mock society, or rather to hold it up for scrutiny by those very people whose social world was being characterized on stage. The Way of the World reflects Congreve\'s personal view ...
  • Paradise LostSatan and Eve Paradise LostSatan and Eve Paradise LostSatan and Eve Since the beginning of Paradise Lost, a reader can witness the dramatizing power possessed by Satan, and how he takes advantage of this very power in order to satisfy his own causes. One such property of Satans fantastic powers is his ability to manipulate any individual into a false belief of who he really is, and therefore prevent a habitant of paradise from discovering his true purpose that is hidden behind his actions. One such example of this, and one of the most...