The Westward Spread Of Inca and Egyptian Culture

The second half of the twentieth century has seen many changes in
theories
concerning the mode of colonization of the islands of Micronesia, and the
rise of the Inca
Empire, with it\'s striking similarities to Egypt. In the past, it has been
suggested that
Asians had worked their way through the Pacific, over a period of thousands
of years. It
was believed that each island group had formed independently, and that the
residents,
while they were of the same race, had totally different cultures. Since
the 1940\'s,
however, these views have been changing. It is now accepted by many
scholars that early
Egyptians sailed as far west as South America, in their huge reed boats.
In turn, the Incas,
who owe many of their technological advancements to these Egyptian
travelers, set sail to
the west, colonizing Easter Island, Hawaii, and the other Pacific islands.
The most common misconception about these early travels is that they
took place
on boats or ships. This is definitely not the case. In fact, the
Egyptians and Incas relied
on rafts; the Incas used balsa logs ( Kon-Tiki 21), the Egyptians
used bundles of papyrus
reeds (Ra 3). One striking piece of evidence for Egyptian-Inca contact is
the existence of
reed rafts on Lake Titicaca that are exactly like rafts used on Lake Chad
and the Nile (Ra
3). Of course, this could be merely coincidence, but much more evidence
exists to
support the theory of ancient contacts between Egyptians and Pre-Colombian
Incas.
The most positive, though hardly concrete, item is the legends of the