Social Studies
Celebrate Black/Women History Month
For my social studies report I researched Ida B. Wells-Barnett. I was to set-up an interview with the person I was assigned. While researching Ida B. Wells I was very interested in her works and achievements. She was a very interesting person in our history and I feel that she deserves a lot more credit considering all the work she did. Read threw my interview to learn more about her?

Given Questions:

Q: What are some of your greatest achievements in life?

A: I started Chicago's Negro Fellowship League to provide lodging, employment counseling, and social activities for young black men arriving from the South because the YMCA would not except black men at the time and at the same time, she led the protests that resulted in a change in the YMCA's racial policy.

Q: Who, if any, are some of your role models?

A: I do not have a person as a role model I was influenced when one day I was taking a ride on the railroad on day when I was told that I had to move from first class to the smocking coach section due to the new law "Separate but Equal". This law stated that blacks must seat in the smocking coach area.

Q: What is your educational background?

A: I attended high school at Rust University High School and Industrial School for Freed Slaves.

Q: Do you have any family influences?

A: No. My parents were slaves and died when I was 14 years old.

Q: What are some of the changes you would like to see as far as treatment of blacks in American society?

A: I would like to see all racism END!

Q: Is there any advise you would like to give today's youth?

A: I would like to tell them to turn down peer pressure and do what you fell is right and not judge people because of the color of there skin. And to the black kids who are still being judged hold your head up high and never hide your feelings I did it and so can you!

Q: Is there anything you would like to change as far as your own life?

A: Not really I mainly just want to see racism come to an end.

My Origional Questions:

Q: Is there anything as far as you remember that you were greatly affected by meaning a racial incident?

A: Yes there is only one and it is the incident about my train ride. That incident motivated me to go on and fight for the rights of blacks and at the same time it effected me in a way that is to hard to explain.

Q: How did it effect you being a child of slaves and how did it make you fell?

A: Being a child of slaves was a very difficult thing for me to go threw in my life. I was judged around that my hole life I even had to go to a special school for slaves.

Q: Are you happy at the success of what you did for America?

A: Yes I am. I feel that I and many other's mad a great effect towards America.

Q: Are you happy being remembered the way you are?

A: Yes I am very happy being remembered the way I am. I am very proud with my success and I greatly appreciate that the U.S. Postal service has issued a stamp of me.

Q: Are you pleased with the way blacks are being treated today?

A: Yes and no. Yes because there has been I great deal of progress over the years. No because there are still many problems with they way black people are being treated. I mean just a few weeks ago a young black man was shot at 41 times and was killed. The worst part of it is that the people who shot him were police officers. There was absolutely no reason why the police shot this man and these police officers should pay for what they did to this man. The difference is that today people are not allowed to do cruel things to people just because of there skin color.