Part 2

General Review of the Sex Situation

We know that the speaker of the poem is Dorothy Parker herself. Knowing that Dorothy is a woman that got the reputation of being hard to please, you can almost assume that it is going to be a very negative poem. As you read the poem you know right away that it is a woman telling us about the "sex situation." The tone she writes in is a very negative one to that of the opposite gender. She does not know that this is the way every man feels. She might have been writing about past experiences in her own love life, and wants to let it all out because her experiences were negative ones. The audience she was writing for was obviously for females, because she does not talk kindly of the male gender.
The theme of the poem is the contrasts of both man and woman. The first two lines talk about how woman wants marriage with but one person at a time, and man is always looking for something new or unusual. Right away she makes the assumption that all men are the same along with all women being the same. At the end she says, "what earthy good can come of it?" Here she means if both genders are so much different how can they become one with another. Do they have to put up with one another? Do they have to acknowledge that they both are different and what something different? These are the questions that she brings up assuming that this is true for all men and women. I disagree with everything she said because once one finds another they become attached and the men don't want something new, a different for of fun, and certainly don't get bored with what she offers.
The structure of this poem is an AA BB rhythmic pattern. This meaning that the ending words of the first two lines rhyme, the ending words of the third and forth line rhyme, and their after. There are two stanzas each consisting of four lines. The words she uses to describe how each one feels give a good clear picture of what she is trying to say. I don't like the way she used the word gist in the second to last line. This word gives too much emphasis to the ending of the poem.

How to eat alone

The speaker of this poem is a voice imitating any individual looking to get in touch with him or herself. The speaker goes into to much detail on the inconsequential aspects of the poem. He or she does not need all this detail to get their point across to the audience. This is a poem where the audience could be anyone that wants to hear what the speaker is trying to say. The speaker is making a single point that everyone should experience, so the audience is anyone that wants to take advantage of what he has to say.
The theme or major point that the speaker is trying to get across is that sometimes the best company is that of your own. You know your own self, so you know what you like, which makes for the best times because you can alter your own feelings. This is probably why there is so much detail in the poem. The speaker was trying to set the perfect night just the way he wanted and being by himself would allow him to do so.
There is no rhyme pattern going on which makes it a blank verse poem. The poem is not set up in any form because there is only one point to get across to the audience. The speaker tries to make it as simple as possible for the audience to get a clear picture of what he is saying. The choice of words he uses is the same as the structure, simple. This is again to get the reader to understand completely what he is trying to say.

Part 3

Early in the morning,
Late at night.
Two dead boys,
Got up to fight.

Back to back,
They faced each other.
Drew their swords,
And shoot each other.

A deaf policeman,
Heard the noise.
Came and killed,
The two