New Rules of the Road

Foremost is the safety of bikers who must share the roads with automobiles. Just as disconcerting is the high incidence of accidents on paths restricted to use by pedestrians, skateboarders, and other bikers. Teaching cycling etiquette and designating roads as multi-vehicle highways are inexpensive and practical and can alleviate the majority of hazards bikers face.

A Touch of Irony

You want irony? Try this bit of information: according to The Daily Microcosm's Anna Fornos, a city which sponsors three annual cycling events and supports the county's alternative transportation program, there is not a single bike lane. We need to think about doing something to reverse the current situation. And now that we have the name of a giant corporation backing us, there's no reason to remain silent regarding the lack of bicycle and pedestrian facilities in our community.

The Future of Bicycle Transportation

Right now the city is drafting a transportation plan, and not of moment too soon. Katherine Fornos claims that if a growing city does not accomodate cyclists who ride to work, people who have ridden to work for years will no longer be riding to work. Ms. Fornos goes on to say the following:

"There isn't one provision to accommodate bikers. Perhaps it's an oversight. Or perhaps it's the lack of bikers in the city council. We can safely assume that the director of the Losantiville Planning Organization doesn't bike (at least, not outdoors)."

What We Can Do

So if it's someone with legislative pull we need, we can go straight to the governor's office and find a state bicycle coordinator. With some pressure she will work with local governments to apportion some road money to non-highway programs. But unless we speak up, we'll go unnoticed.