Crew Resource Management


Introduction
There are many reasons why those involved with the airline safety commit errors that on occasion lead to the injury or death of innocent people - people who had every right to expect better of their caretakers. Such accidents can be traced to many broad categories. Categories such as weather, mechanical malfunction, terrorist acts or into what may be termed ?acts of God'. Apart from these, perhaps the most important and the fundamental category are errors attributed to the ?human factor' such as sheer carelessness, inexperience, personality flaws, fatigue, in adequate training or inadequate operating instructions. However, the irony aspect of this issue is that in most of the cases, accidents were resulted from the performance error made by healthy and properly qualified individuals though it is a somewhat ambiguous term and is in our haste to attribute an accident to somebody - the pilot.
Over the past decade, one of the most striking developments in aviation safety has been the overwhelming endorsement and widespread implementation of training programs aimed at ?Human Factor? to increasing the effectiveness of crew coordination and well being of crew resource management. (Human Factor Digest No.1, 1989)
Crew Resource Management
Crew Resource Management (CRM) training has become an integral part of many training programs for the pilots and other aviation personnel. Wiener, Kanki and Helmreich (1993) have defined CRM as ?using all available