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dinner at the a box of violence

In many peoples' living rooms there sits an outlet for violence that often goes unnoticed. As you scan through the pages there are violent images of fighting, stabbing's, drive by shootings and the list goes on. This violent box is the television, and the children who view it are often pulled into its realistic world of violence scenes with sometimes devastating results.
Much research has gone into showing why children and youth are so mesmerized by this big glowing box and the action that takes place within it. Research shows that it is definitely a major source of violent behavior in children. The research proves time and time again that aggression and television viewing do go hand in hand. Television violence causes children to be violent and the effects can be life-long.
How does a T.V. box become an influence nightmare for children and you?.Violent television viewing does affect children. The effects have been seen in a number of cases. In New York, a 16-year-old boy broke into a cellar. When the police caught him and asked him why he was wearing gloves he replied that he had learned to do so to not leave fingerprints and that he discovered this on television. In Alabama, a nine-year-old boy received a bad report card from his teacher. He suggested sending the teacher poisoned candy as revenge as he had seen on television the night before. In California, a seven-year-old boy sprinkled ground-up glass into the  lamb stew the family was to eat for dinner. When asked why he did it he replied that he wanted to see if the results would be the same in real life as they were on television (Howe 72). These are certainly startling examples of how television can affect the child. It must be pointed out that all of these situations were directly caused by children watching violent television.
Not only does television violence affect the child's youth, but it can also affect his or her adulthood. Some psychologists and psychiatrists feel that continued exposure to such violence might unnaturally speed up the impact of the adult world on the child. This can force the child into a kind of premature maturity. As the child matures into an adult, he can become bewildered, have a greater distrust towards others, a superficial approach to adult problems, and even an
unwillingness to become an adult (Carter 14).
Television violence can destroy a young child's mind. The effects of this violence can be long-lasting, if not never-ending. For some, television at its worst, is an assault on a child's mind, an insidious influence that upsets moral balance and makes a child prone to aggressive behavior as it warps his or her perception of the real world. Other see television as an unhealthy intrusion into a child's learning process, substituting easy pictures for the discipline of reading and
concentrating and transforming the young viewer into a hypnotized non-thinker (Langone 48). As you can see, television violence can disrupt a child's learning and thinking ability which will cause life long problems. If a child cannot do well in school, his or her whole future is at stake.
Why do children like the violence that they see on television? "Since media violence is much more vicious than that which children normally experience, real-life aggression appears bland by comparison" (Dorr 127). The violence on television is able to be more exciting than the violence that is normally viewed on the streets.
The television violence can cause actual violence in a number of ways. As explained above, after viewing television violence theworld becomes bland in comparison. The child needs to create violence to keep himself satisfied (Dorr 127). Also the children find the violent characters on television fun to imitate. "Children do imitate the behavior of models such as those portrayed in television, movies, etc. They do so because the ideas that are shown to them on television are more attractive to the viewer than those the viewer can think up himself"     (Brown 98). This has been widely seen lately with the advent of the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers. Young children cannot seem to get enough, wrestling, Power Rangers, Ninja Turtles, of these fictional characters and will portray them ... more

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Narrative of the Captivity of

The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson is a personal account, written by Mary Rowlandson in 1682, of what life in captivity was like.  Her narrative of her captivity by Indians became popular in both American and English literature.  Mary Rowlandson basically lost everything by an Indian attack on her town Lancaster, Massachusetts in 1675; where she is then held prisoner and spends eleven weeks with the Wampanoag Indians as they travel to safety.  What made this piece so popular in both England and America was not only because of the great narrative skill used be Mary Rowlandson, but also the intriguing personality shown by the complicated character who has a struggle in recognizing her identity.  The reoccurring idea of food and the word remove, used as metaphors throughout the narrative, could be observed to lead to Mary Rowlandsons repression of anger, depression, and realization of change throughout her journey and more so at the end of it.
The idea of food is constantly used throughout the Mary Rowlandsons narrative, because it was the only essential need that she was concerned everyday to survive.  Before the captivity, Mary Rowlandson was an innocent housewife that knew nothing of what suffering was like.  She has always had plenty of food, shelter, and clothing.  As a reader, you can see how her views towards the Indians choice of food gradually changes throughout her journey, and how it is related to the change in her own self.  After tragically losing all of her family and her home, she had to repress her feelings to move on with the Indians to survive.  She described the Wampanoag Indians at Ravenous beasts when she was captivated, which shows the anger that she felt towards the Indians at that time.  The Indians diet was really different from the whites.  Rowlandson hardly ate a thing the first week she was held captive.  She described the Indians food as filthy trash, and she could starve and die before [she] ate such things (306).  As Rowlandsons hunger began to eat her up inside out, she had to repress her spoiled taste and anger in order to survive.  During the seventh remove you can see her views of the Indians food change as she got two ears of Indian corn (307) and didnt want to give it up.  When one Indian asked her can you eat horse liver? (307), Rowlandson replied that she would try if he would give a piece (307).  As she ate it, she described the horse liver as a savory bit it was to me.  She explain to herself that for to the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet (307).  You can see that Rowlandson has experienced a change in her view towards the Indians food.  She began being disgusted with their food then gradually precious it.  There were many times where Rowlandson felt like she could just lay down and die right there, but as the journey goes on she says I shall not die but live, and declare the works of the Lord (308).  Her desire to live was encouraged through her dependence on God, which in turn helped repress her true feelings of depression because of the sufferings she was enduring.  As Rowlandsons travels goes on you could see that she has learned to accept the Indians culture.  In the eight remove she says I boiled my peas and bear together, and invited my master and mistress to dinner,(309).  That statement by Rowlandson does not seem like shes in captivity and that shes actually suffering.  She also made clothes for the Indians, which they very much appreciated.  Rowlandson realizes as she thinks to herself that throughout her time with the Indians not one of them offered the least imaginable miscarriage to me(310).    She has fit herself into the Wampanoag Indian society by suppressing her true feelings of anger and depression towards the Indians in order to survive.  During the eighteenth remove she stole a piece of horse feet from a child.  Then she claims that the things that my soul refused to touch are as my sorrowful meat(318).  Rowlandson seems to be willing to do anything to ... more

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