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dance lodge the unstoppable play

It's Homecoming night, and the football team is scrambling on the wet locker room floor.  The air is packed with steam from the hot showers colliding into the cool fall air.  It smells like -- well it smells like a football locker room.  Talk of whose date is the hottest, and who played the best enraptures the ears of all within listening distance.  Tonight we will have some fun.
For now the electrifying high school Dance far outweighs the thrilling victory over the homecoming competitors.  Soon after the dance, when they start feeling their aches and pains, the football players will remember the game.  They will remember what it took to get there, and what got them there.  Ever since anyone could remember, Medicine Lodge Indians have been taught one lesson above all others.  If executed correctly, "Shoot R 32 Veer" is the unstoppable play.
Many people may not know what the "Shoot R 32 Veer" is.  It is a football play designed so intricately, that no matter what the defense does, they can not defend against it.  It is based on the idea of the triple option.  This is where the quarterback can hand the ball off to the fullback, he can pitch the ball to the tailback, or if he needs to he can keep it and run it himself.
First is The Handoff to the fullback.  After the ball is snapped, the fullback charges the line of scrimage.  Hoping to blow through the defensive line, and crush into the linebackers, picking up at least five yards.  It is the quarterback's job to read the defensive tackle.  If he goes out, he hands it off.  If he goes in, he keeps it.
Assuming that the defense doesn't want to take the five-yard pounding from the fullback.  They will crash their tackle in.  The quarterback then keeps the ball.  By now, we have reached the second stage of the play.  The Pitch" is intended to make the unblocked defensive end decide whether to go after the quarterback or to attempt to tackle the tailback after the pitch.  Before the play starts, the quarterback calls, Down, ordering his team to get into a stance.  After one second, he calls Set, putting the tailback into motion. When the taiback is directly behind the fullback, the quarterback says, Hut, to begin the play.  Then the tailback bellies (runs in a curved pattern) deep behind the fullback and the quarterback.  After the fake to the fullback, he runs outside the end. This is where his next crucial read comes into play. If the end -- or outside linebacker, whichever one is there -- comes after the quarterback, he pitches it. The tailback then runs outside the wide receivers block down the sideline. If the defensive player goes after the tailback, the quarterback keeps it. He cuts inside, between the play side running backs kick out block (he blocks either the end or the outside linebacker out of the play) and the play side tackles seal block (he makes contact with either the tackle or the inside linebacker, and slowly positions his butt as if it were a camera watching the back). With every other possible would-be tackler being blocked, there should be no chance of either of the quarterback or the tailback being tackled.
There are not many plays that can actually be called unstoppable, but the play that our coach has chosen as our Bread and Butter, is definitely one of them. With a little bit of Buddy Taylor Football, your team can also steamroll over opponents with this devastating play. One thing that I feel obligated to remind everyone is, that with the right team, any play is unstoppable.



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Comanche Indians

COMANCHE INDIANS

The Comanches, exceptional horsemen who dominated the Southern Plains, played a prominent role in Texas frontier history throughout much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Anthropological evidence indicates that they were originally a mountain tribe, a branch of the Northern Shoshones, who roamed the Great Basin region of the western United States as crudely equipped hunters and gatherers. Both cultural and linguistic similarities confirm the Comanches' Shoshone origins. The Comanche language is derived from the Uto-Aztecan linguistic family and is virtually identical to the language of the Northern Shoshones. Sometime during the late seventeenth century, the Comanches acquired horses, and that acquisition drastically altered their culture. The life of the pedestrian tribe was revolutionized as they rapidly evolved into a mounted, well-equipped, and powerful people. Their new mobility allowed them to leave their mountain home and their Shoshone neighbors and move onto the plains of eastern Colorado and western Kansas, where game was plentiful. After their arrival on the Great Plains, the Comanches began a southern migration that was encouraged by a combination of factors. By moving south, they had greater access to the mustangs of the Southwest. The warm climate and abundant buffalo were additional incentives for the southern migration. The move also facilitated the acquisition of French trade goods, including firearms, through barter with the Wichita Indians on the Red River. Pressure from more powerful and better-armed tribes to their north and east, principally the Blackfoot and Crow Indians, also encouraged their migration. A vast area of the South Plains, including much of North, Central, and West Texas, soon became Comanche country, or Comancheria. Only after their arrival on the Southern Plains did the tribe come to be known as Comanches, a name derived from the Ute word Komdnteia, meaning "enemy," or, literally, "anyone who wants to fight me all the time." The
Spaniards in New Meadco, who encountered the Comanches in the early eighteenth century, gave the tribe the name by which they were later known to Spaniards and Americans able. Although the tribe came to be known historically as Comanches, they called themselves Nermernuh, or "the People."
The Comanches did not arrive on the South Plains as a unified body but rather in numerous family groups or bands. The band structure of Comanche society was not rigid, and bands coalesced and broke apart, depending on the needs and goals of their members. As many as thirteen different, Comanche bands were identified during the historic period, and most probably there were others that were never identified. However, five major bands played important roles in recorded Comanche history.  
The southernmost band was called Penateka, or "Honey Eaters." Their range extended from the Edwards Plateau to the headwaters of the Central Texas rivers. Because of their location, the Penatekas played the most prominent role in Texas history. North Of Penateka, country was the habitat of the band called Nokoni, or "Those Who Turn Back." The Nokonis roamed from the Cross Timbers region of North Texas to the mountains of New Mexico. Two smaller bands, the Tanima ("Liver-Eaters") and the Tenawa ("Those Who Stay Downstream"), shared the range of the Nokonis. These three divisions are sometimes referred to collectively as Middle Comanches. Still farther north was the range of the Kotsotekas, or "Buffalo-Eaters." Their territory covered what is now western Oklahoma, where they often camped along the Canadian River. The northernmost band was known as the Yamparikas, or "Yap-Eaters," a name derived from that of an edible root. Their range extended north to the Arkansas River.  The fifth major band, known as Quahadis (Antelopes), roamed the high plains of the Llano Estacado.

FOODS
The Comanche remained a nomadic people throughout their free existence. Buffalo, their lifeblood, provided food, clothing, and shelter. Their predominantly meat diet was supplemented with wild roots, fruits, and nuts, or with produce obtained by trade with neighboring agricultural tribes, principally the Wichita and Caddo groups to the east and the Pueblo tribes to the west. Because of their skills as trades, the Comanches controlled much of the commerce of the Southern Plains. They bartered buffalo products, horses, and captives for manufactured items and foodstuffs.
SHELTER
The familiar Plains type teepee constructed of tan buffalo hide stretched over ... more

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