Call Of The Wild


Find More Call Of The Wild

Looking for essays on call of the wild? We have thousands of essays on this topic and more.

call of the wild Robert Edward Lee

They say you had to see him to believe that a man so fine could exist. He
was handsome. He was clever. He was brave. He was gentle. He was generous
and charming, noble and modest, admired and beloved. He had never failed at
anything in his upright soldier's life. He was born a winner, this Robert
E. Lee. Except for once. In the greatest contest of his life, in a war
between the South and the North, Robert E. Lee lost (Redmond). Through his
life, Robert E. Lee would prove to be always noble, always a gentleman, and
always capable of overcoming the challenge lying before him.
Robert Edward Lee was born on January 19, 1807 (Compton's). He was born
into one of Virginia's most respected families. The Lee family had moved to
America during the mid 1600's. Some genealogist can trace the Lee's roots
back to William the Conqueror. Two members of the Lee family had signed the
Declaration of Independence, Richard Lee and Francis Lightfoot. Charles Lee
had served as attorney General under the Washington administration while
Richard Bland Lee, had become one of Virginia's leading Federalists.
Needless to say, the Lees were an American Political dynasty (Nash 242).
Lee's father was General Henry Light-Horse Harry Lee. He had been a
heroic cavalry leader in the American Revolution. He married his cousin
Matilda. They had four children, but Matilda died in 1790. On her death bed
she added insult to injury upon Henry Lee by leaving her estate to her
children. She feared Henry would squander the family fortune. He was well
known for poor investments and schemes that had depleted his own family's
fortune (Connelly 5).
Henry Lee solved his financial problems by marrying Robert's mother Anne
Carter, daughter of one of Virginia's wealthiest men (Nash 242). Henry Lee
eventually spent his family into debt. Their stately mansion, Stratford
Hall, was turned over to Robert's half brother. Anne Lee moved with her
children to a simple brick house in Alexandria. Light Horse Harry was
seldom around. Finally, in 1813 he moved to the West Indies. His self-exile
became permanent, and he was never seen again by his family (Thomas).
Young Robert had other family problems. His mother became very ill. At the
age of twelve he had to shoulder the load of not only being the family's
provider, but also his mother's nurse. When time came for Robert to attend
college, it was obvious his mother could not support him financially. She
was already supporting his older brother at Harvard and three other
children in school. In 1824 he accepted an appointment to the United States
Military Academy. During his time at West Point Lee distinguished himself
as a soldier and a student. Lee graduated with honors in 1829 (Nash 245).
His graduation was dampened by a call to the bedside of his ailing mother.
When he arrived home he found his fifty-four year old mother close to
death. A death caused by struggles and illnesses of her difficult life.
Robert was always close to his mother. He again attended to her needs until
her death. On July 10, 1829, Anne Lee died with Robert, her closest son, at
her side. Forty years later Robert would stand in the same room and say,
It seems but yesterday that his beloved mother died (Connelly 6).
While awaiting his first assignment, Lee frequently visited Arlington, the
estate of George Washington Parke Custis. Custis was the grandson of Martha
Washington and the adopted son of George Washington. After Martha's death
Custis left Mount Vernon and used his inheritance to build Arlington in
1778. Arlington was set on a hill over looking the Potomac river and
Washington D.C. (NPS Arlington House). Custis had only one daughter, Mary
Anna Randolph. Mary had been pampered and petted throughout her life. Lee's
Courtship with Mary soon turned serious, before long they were thinking of
marriage. However, before Robert could propose he was assigned to Cockspur
Island, Georgia.
Robert returned to Arlington in 1830. He and Mary decided to get married.
The two were married on June 30, 1831(Nash 248). Shortly there after the
Lees went to Fort Monroe. Mary was never happy here. She soon went back to
Arlington. Mary hated army life. She would, for the most part, stay at
Arlington throughout the rest of Robert's time in the United States Army.
The fact that he was separated from his family, and that he was slow to
move up in rank, left Lee feeling quite depressed a great deal of ... more

call of the wild

Research on Call Of The Wild

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Call Of The Wild" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Call Of The Wild essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Call Of The Wild and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.
Start a New Essay on Call Of The Wild

Find essay on Call Of The Wild

Society's Reactions To Walden

When Walden was published during the nineteenth century, the reactions of people were exceedingly different than they are of modern society.  These reactions were towards every aspect of Thoreau and altered with every change in time.  The foremost reactions toward Henry David Thoreau occurred when he went to live on his own at Walden Pond.  As strange as it may seem, some critics think that Thoreaus choice to live at Walden Pond was simply because he was a hermit.  However, his sheltered life was the result of his brothers death, which promoted Henry to go to Walden Pond (Life 1).  Henry explains in Walden, I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived (Life 1).  As anyone may obviously see, Thoreau did not choose a life on the pond simply because he was a hermit.  He left his nearby town of Concord for the life at the pond on July 4, 1845, which was Independence Day (Life 1).  By leaving for Walden on July 4th Independence Day, Henry would have spent his first full day at Walden Pond on the anniversary of his brothers birthday (Life 1).
Although many believe Henry was a recluse, Henry was no stranger to society while he lived at the pond (Life 1).  As he himself said, I had more visitors while I lived in the woods than at any other period in my life; I mean that I had some (Thoreau 119).  These visitors Henry had at the pond included both his family and his friends, who he had, frequent dinners with (Life 1).
The reactions of the people during Thoreaus time were very diverse, some were positive while others were negative.  John Burroughs was one of the few people who wrote frequently on Thoreau.  He points out quite rightly that Thoreau was more interested in natural philosophy than natural science (Harding 87).  In later years he forgot that and devoted most of his criticism to pointing out Thoreaus many errors in scientific identification of species, and thus lost the broader concept of Thoreaus work (Hendrick 87).  Meanwhile, the reactions of Thoreaus neighbors werent all that bad.  In Thoreaus Journal, Thoreau states, How I love the simple reserved countrymen my neighbors who mind their own business and let me alone who never waylaid nor shot at me to my knowledge when I crossed their fields though each one has a gun in his house (Harding 47).  It is written that the people who lived around Thoreau thought of him as stoical and indifferent and unsympathetic as a veritable Indian; and how he hunted without trap or gun, and fished without hook or snare (Hendrick 89).  A young girl once complained that having taken her to the top of a mountain, he fixed his earnest gaze on a distant point in the landscape and remarked, How fare is it in a bee-line to that spot (Hendrick 119).
In 1862, when Thoreau died, it would have been easy to predict that he and his works would soon be forgotten (Hendrick 154).  After his death various friends, including both Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bronson Alcott, borrowed the manuscript volumes of the journal from Thoreaus sister Sophia to read for their own personal pleasure (Torrey vi).  Wentworth Higginson, inspired by such a reading, made an effort to have the journal published, but he ran into the determined opposition of Sophia Thoreau who thought it too personal to be opened to the gaze of the general public (Torrey vi).  When Higginson attempted to enlist the aid of Judge Hoar, Concords leading citizen, in persuading her otherwise, he met with the withering reply, why should anyone care to have Thoreaus journal put into print (Torrey vi)?  Still unmined is a wealth of material on political and social attitudes of the time.  The journal is a veritable gold mine with its ore still virtually untouched (Torrey vii).  It is now seen that the impression Thoreau made on his friends was the right one; he was not well ... more

call of the wild

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • C: Damnation of a Canyon C: Damnation of a Canyon Damnation of a Canyon The Damnation of a Canyon By Edward Abbey Not many people know of the used-to-be 150-mile excursion that the Glen Canyon had to offer. Not many people know how to sail a raft down a river for a week. Not many people know how to interact with nature and the animals that come with it. We seem to come from a world that is dependent on time and consumed in money. Edward Abbey is what you would call an extreme environmentalist. He talks about how it was an environmental disaster...
  • A: Robert Edward Lee A: Robert Edward Lee Robert Edward Lee They say you had to see him to believe that a man so fine could exist. He was handsome. He was clever. He was brave. He was gentle. He was generous and charming, noble and modest, admired and beloved. He had never failed at anything in his upright soldier's life. He was born a winner, this Robert E. Lee. Except for once. In the greatest contest of his life, in a war between the South and the North, Robert E. Lee lost (Redmond). Through his life, Robert E. Lee would prove to be ...
  • L: Society\s Reactions To Walden L: Society\s Reactions To Walden Society\'s Reactions To Walden When Walden was published during the nineteenth century, the reactions of people were exceedingly different than they are of modern society. These reactions were towards every aspect of Thoreau and altered with every change in time. The foremost reactions toward Henry David Thoreau occurred when he went to live on his own at Walden Pond. As strange as it may seem, some critics think that Thoreaus choice to live at Walden Pond was simply because he was a hermit. ...
  • L: Salem Witch L: Salem Witch Salem Witch Paranoia Paranoia is the underlying factor of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Samuel Parris had a great terror of Satan arming his foes to destroy both him and his church. He was obsessed with any sinfulness that he saw. Although it was not just Reverend Parris that had these beliefs. It was the paranoid society, which he was a member of. The Puritans were paranoid of being different. Conformity was a large part of their life because they were all driven into the same religion. Origi...
  •  : Great Wall Of China Report : Great Wall Of China Report Great Wall Of China Report The Great Wall of China The Great Wall of China is truly one of the greatest architectural achievements in recorded history. The longest structure ever built, it is about 6,700 kilometers (4,163 miles) long and made entirely by hand. This wall is said to be visible from the moon. It crosses Northern China, from the East coast to Central China (Karls, 1). This massive wall is not only one of the ancient wonders of the world, but it also has been the inspiration of many ...
  • O: Merchant Of Venice: Shylock the Antagonist? O: Merchant Of Venice: Shylock the Antagonist? Merchant Of Venice: Shylock the Antagonist? In The Merchant of Venice, by William Shakespeare, there appears Shylock. He is a Jew, that much we are told in the cast list. But, as the play unfolds Shylock is seen to be the villian. He is protrayed as being cold, unbending, and evil. But is he? Is Shylock really the antagonist in this play or can he also be viewed as persecuted individual who resorts to revenge only after he has been pushed too far. To fully understand the character of Shylock we ...
  • F: Memoirs of a Mountain High F: Memoirs of a Mountain High Memoirs of a Mountain High It was the summer of 94 when I took a Wilderness Leadership Semester from the Colorado Outward Bound School . Needless to say that it was the most emotional, challenging, and rewarding experience that I have had in all of my 19 ears of existence. One week spent running the Upper Green River in westernColorado and northern Utah. Through The Gates of the Ladour Canyon and Dinosaur National Monument, we floated to end where the Green meets the Colorado River just beyond E...
  •  : Events In Slavery : Events In Slavery Events In Slavery Events that Effected Slavery Essay written by Curtis Cupples Introduction We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness (Thomas Jefferson). The only problem with this passage from the Declaration of Independence is that it does not say, We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men and Negroes are created equ...
  • T: Racism T: Racism racism Did Racism cause enslavement of African Americans? Did Racism cause enslavement of African Americans? To answer this question you have to determine what a slave is? And what Racism is? By my views and believes, slavery is any type of duty somebody does for you. You own them so they work for you otherwise they will get punished. Now Racism is a negative attitude towards another race. After these to words are cleared up you come to a conclusion that racism in the 17th century caused ensla...
  • H: Frankenstein 4 H: Frankenstein 4 Frankenstein 4 According to the Greek poet Hesiod, the Titan demi-god Prometheus was responsible for the creation of men. He manufactured them from clay, from the natural earth. When Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus, she left little doubt that the creator of the monster, Victor Frankenstein, by making a living creature from inaminate parts was a new Prometheus. But her metaphor extends beyond the immediately obvious. In Hesiods myth, Prometheus had an inflated sense of s...
  • E: Calamitatum Of The Individual E: Calamitatum Of The Individual Calamitatum Of The Individual In the realm of critical thinking, Abelard undoubtedly ranked highly in his day. He was an expert dialectician, philosopher and theologian, and as a result led a movement towards individual thinking. He traveled a lonely path of individuality, and when his ideas were suppressed, he found different ways to express his individuality. The beginning of his life was marked by extreme personal freedom. As his journey through life continued, he found himself compounded wit...
  •  : Robert E Lee : Robert E Lee Robert E Lee Lee, Robert E. (Edward) 1807 -- 1870 General in chief of the Confederate armies in the American Civil War. Born in Virginia\'s Westmoreland County on January 19, 1807, the third son of Henry (Light Horse Harry) and Ann Hill Carter Lee. Declining fortunes forced the family\'s removal to Alexandria, where Robert distinguished himself in local schools. His father\'s death in 1811 increased responsibilities on all the sons; Robert, especially, cared for his invalid mother. Lee graduat...
  • W: Henry W: Henry henry He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 (Thoreau 96), on his grandmother\'s farm. Thoreau, who was of French-Huguenot and Scottish...
  • I: Subject: American History - The Regulators of Nort I: Subject: American History - The Regulators of Nort Subject: American History - The Regulators of North Carolina The Regulators of North Carolina: Outraged Opressors The history of colonial North Carolina is bombarded with frequent strife and turmoil. The people of North Carolina, because of a lack in supervision from the British monarchy, learned to possess an independent spirit. The colony remained isolated from the rest of the country because of several geographical conditions such as poor harbors, the abscence of navigable rivers, numerous sw...
  • L: Up From Slavery L: Up From Slavery Up From Slavery Up from slavery Chapter I 45Sl2 Slavery A slave among slaves. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chapter I. I WAS born a slave on a plantation in Franklin County, Virginia. I am not quite sure of the exact place or exact date of my birth, but at any rate I suspect I must have been born somewhere and at some time. As nearly as I have been able to learn, I was born near a cross-roads post-office called Hale\'s Ford, and the year was 185...
  • D: Into The Wild D: Into The Wild Into The Wild Sometimes a character may be pushed over the edge by our materialistic society to discover his/her true roots, which can only be found by going back to nature where monetary status was not important. Chris McCandless leaves all his possessions and begins a trek across the Western United States, which eventually brings him to the place of his demise-Alaska. Jon Krakauer makes you feel like you are with Chris on his journey and uses exerts from various authors such as Thoreau, London...
  • John Muir: His Achievements/Journeys John Muir: His Achievements/Journeys John Muir: His Achievements/Journeys John Muir: His Achievements/Journeys John Muir worked at a factory in Canada. He invented time and money saving machines for the factories. But one day an accident changed his whole outlook on life. As he was tightening a machine belt with a file, the file flew out and pierced his right eye. His left eye grew dim to the reaction. John\'s friends and neighbors tried to help him and brought doctors. Some friends read to him. Children brought him flowers and lis...
  • Heart Of Darkness And Maslow Heart Of Darkness And Maslow Heart Of Darkness And Maslow In the classic novel Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad takes us on a journey into the soul of man. When the character of Marlow travels into the jungle of Africa to find Kurtz, he realizes that he is in a place where the rules of society no longer constrain human nature, and the frightening truths about human beings can be observed first hand. Marlow finds that human nature is something terrible and unlimited by observing the effects of such freedom on Kurtz. He also ...
  • Self reliance Self reliance Self reliance I will, in the following, discuss the theme of self-reliance in the above-mentioned texts. But what exactly is self-reliance? In his 1841 publication called Essays, Ralph Waldo Emerson includes an essay simply entitled Self-Reliance in which he states Trust thyself&Great men have always done so and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age& . Self-reliance is thus defined as the ability to be your own master and to seek your own fortune free from influences from yo...
  • Kim gives a vivid picture of the complexities in I Kim gives a vivid picture of the complexities in I Kim Kim gives a vivid picture of the complexities in India under British rule. It shows the life of the bazaar mystics, of the natives, of the British military. There is a great deal of action and movement, for Kipling\'s vast canvas painted in full detail. The dialogue in the novel makes use of Indian phrases translated by the author, they give the flavor of native speech in India. They are also touches of the native behavior and shrewdness. The time the novel took place was around the late nin...
  • Huck Finn Huck Finn Huck Finn Why does Huckleberry Finn reject civilization? In Mark Twain\'s novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain describes Huck Finn as a normal down to earth kid from the 1800\'s. Huck Finn rejects civilization because he has no reason for it. What has civilization done for him? Nothing! It has only hurt him one way or another, time and time again. Why should Huck Finn like civilization? Civilization is on land. All that the land and civilization has brought him was bad things. Fo...
  • Environmental Philosophy Environmental Philosophy Environmental Philosophy Many authors throughout history have expressed their, or societys, yearning towards a simpler life: a life without responsibilities or obligations, a life without worry or regret. Sigurd Olson expresses such a yearning in his essay Contemplation, where through reading Lao Tzu, he had discovered that in order to understand and relate to wilderness, we only need a contemplative mind, which is simple and easy. He suggested that life in wilderness is a continual contempla...
  • Man?s Journey Into Self In Heart Of Darkness And A Man?s Journey Into Self In Heart Of Darkness And A Man?s Journey Into Self In Heart Of Darkness And Apocalypse Now Inherent inside every human soul is a savage evil side that remains repressed by society. Often this evil side breaks out during times of isolation from our culture, and whenever one culture confronts another. History is loaded with examples of atrocities that have occurred when one culture comes into contact with another. Whenever fundamentally different cultures meet, there is often a fear of contamination and loss of self that le...
  • Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Physical Geography of Saskatchewan Introduction Saskatchewan is situated in the central Prairie between Alberta on the west and Manitoba on the east. Its neighbour on the north is the North West Territories, and on the south it borders with the United States. Saskatchewan is rectangular in shape--it is the only Canadian province none of whose borders was determined by the landform feature like river or mountain range. The province is located in the Central Stan...
  • Turtle Turtle Turtle Distinction For many reasons the human race could be called a blessing. Great advanced in technology, medicine and even the fact we are the most sophisticated species on the planet. Are we a gift to planet Earth, or far from it? With cast amounts of pollution and destruction of the planet, not to mention unthinkable acts of violence and hate that has been going on since the beginning of time. Are we really as sophisticated and important as we have led ourselves to believe? Are we any bett...