Branches Up A Snow White Trunk


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branches up a snow white trunk Winter Oak - Yuri Nagibin
Winter Oak - Yuri Nagibin

1.a) Our gut reaction to Winter Oak is that it had a lot of meaning, but was dull and tedious. Some words and phrases we used to relate our thoughts on the story are as follows:
- Boring.
- Monotonous.
- No real conflict.
- No feeling.
- No real plot.
- Didnt invoke a strong reaction.
- There was a definite lesson to be learned.


1.b) Yuri Nagibin used different devices to evoke various reactions in us, some of these were:

The dialogue; it was concise yet boring but realistic for example, when Anna Vasilyevna was trying to teach the children their nouns. "A noun is a part of speech that denotes an object. In grammar an" (Nagibin 59). Much of this dialogue is unnecessary; we the reader understands what goes on in the classroom, and two pages are not needed to establish nouns. Also, through dialogue Anna proved to be a snob. "Good morning Anna Vasilyevna! Frolov raised his fur hat above his solid, close-cropped head. what are you doing! Put it back on its freezing! Frolov probably wanted to pull his fur over his eyes himself" (Nagibin 58). Anna feels as though she is high and mighty, and will not even acknowledge Frolovs attempt of respect towards her. There were very powerful images present in the forest, such as the gigantic winter oak. The image of Savushkin standing in front of the Winter Oak, in utter awe of its splendor and Anna Vasilyevna realizing the beauty of the winter oak appeals to the sight, because it is easy to picture in our minds.
stood an oak as enormous and magnificent as a cathedral. The trees seemed to part respectfully to allow their older companion to spread out in full force. Its lower branches stretched out in a tent over the clearing. The snow had filled the deep crevices of the bark, and the trunk, which was so wide that it would have taken three men to get their arms around it, looked as if it were shot through with silver thread. It had hardly shed any of its foliage which had dried up during the fall; the oak was covered with snow-capped leaves to the very top. (Nagibin 65)

We experienced an unexpected plot twist when the stern Anna Vasilyevna went into the forest, and understood Savushkins point of view about the winter oak, and why he was late everyday. "My God! Anna Vasilyevna thought painfully. What clearer way of admitting my impotence? She remembered that days class and all her other classes: on those things without which man, helpless in his feelings, is mute before the world-on their beautiful language, which was a fresh, beautiful, and rich as life was bounteous and beautiful" (Nagibin 66). We would not expect the great Anna Vasilyevna to have any faults, and to be strong enough to admit to them. We start to feel compassion towards Savuskin who is always late, because of the innocent way he makes Anna Vasilyevna realize that there are things in life that are more important than just work and reputation. "Totally unaware of what was passing in his teachers heart, Savushkin was messing about at the foot of the oak, treating the oak simply as his old acquaintance" (Nagibin 65). We also begin to c.....are for Anna Vasilyevna, as she changes and grows into a new person. "And suddenly Anna Vasilyevna realized that the most wonderful thing in the forest wasnt the winter oak, but the small person in the worn felt boots and the patched cheap clothes, the son of a shower nurse and a soldier whod perished for his country-a marvelous and mysterious citizen of the future" (Nagibin 67).


2.a) there are many themes being made apparent in Winter Oak, some that we found were:
- One should not rush through life and over look the little things.
- We can learn a lot from each other.
- Seeing things from another perspective can change our own.


b) We feel that the most significant quote, in the book, which explained everything to us was " And suddenly Anna Vasilyevna realized that the most wonderful thing in the forest wasnt the winter oak, but the small person in the worn felt ... more

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Plants In Extreme Conditions

In many ways, plants are far more versatile and successful to life on earth than animals and have been here for far longer. They were the first to colonise this planet and without them we would not exist, for we are totally dependent on them. Even today with all our technology they continue to amaze us with their ability to inhabit places we humans could not survive, from the frozen Antarctic to the intensity of a volcanic spring, plants utilise their environments to their own advantage and evolve to survive the harshest of landscapes.
A plant needs four basic things to survive, water, warmth, light and minerals and any place that can provide even a little of these essential needs, will be colonised by plants. The most important environmental factors to which plants must adapt themselves to are, water availability, temperature change, light, and soil conditions. For any species, each of these factors has a small or large value, and species that have adapted to extreme environments have undergone changes to adapt to their particular and often narrow ecological conditions. Its survival of the fittest and the plants that I shall discuss first in this essay, respond to their environment so well that they can live in a part of the world that denies them almost all of their four basic needs, the Antarctic.
The immense Antarctic ice-cap holds three-quarters of the worlds freshwater, this may seem ideal as plants need water, but plants can only use water in liquid form, and the frozen surfaces of the South Pole are inaccessible to them. Light is also a hard commodity to find here as the sun, even in summer never rises high in the sky, and in the autumn it sinks until it leaves the South Pole in darkness for half the year and as for warmth, it is the coldest place on earth. Yet three hundred miles from this place were no living thing could survive for any length of time, there are plants, algae, living together with fungi on the tips of mountains, which protrude through the snow. These hardy plants are mostly in a dormant state, the severe temperatures rising only a couple of days a year just enough to enable the Lichen to enliven their body chemistry and to photosynthesise. Some Lichen is black and this enables them to retain what little of the suns heat they can to melt the snow around them. Some grow on rocks that are frequented by birds as their droppings provide a rich source of nutrients. This activity however happens in the warmest part of the summer and as cold winter sets in they return to their dormant sleep.
Other algae manages to survive in the snow itself, they live in between the individual flakes just below the surface and during the summer their chlorophyll is disguised with a red pigment to protect the algae from the ultra-violet rays of the sun, as they shine more strongly through the snow. As the sun shines however, it melts the snow and does give them the liquid water they need. In the winter, when the snow is below zero the algae manufacture a kind of anti-freeze which prevents their bodies from freezing and they are invisible below the surface, but when the summer arrives once more they launch themselves forward with microscopic beating hairs and move closer to the surface and the light.
At the other end of the earth, The North Pole, the situation is different. After the Ice Age, as the ice retreated, plants began to colonise the land it revealed and as they did they evolved in to different forms, better equipped to grow in their new environment. A species of willow developed that grows not vertically but horizontally, restricted to the ground, less the fierce Arctic wind should level it. It may become as long as a European relative would grow high, but it never raises more than four inches of the ground.
In the Arctic summer, the plants that live there have a moderate supply of the four requirements. The temperature is well above freezing, so there is plenty of water around and the sun is high in the sky for ... more

branches up a snow white trunk

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