Araby Setting


Find More Araby Setting

“Araby” is set in Dublin, Ireland in various places around the city. At the onset of the story, the boy is on the street where he lives, North Richmond Street. He frequently meets his friends and they play in the street until dusk falls and they go home for dinner.

Araby Setting

Summary



The narrator, an unnamed boy, describes the North Dublin street on which his house is located. He thinks about the priest who died in the house before his family moved in and the games that he and his friends played in the street. He recalls how they would run through the back lanes of the houses and hide in the shadows when they reached the street again, hoping to avoid people in the neighborhood, particularly the boy’s uncle or the sister of his friend Mangan. The sister often comes to the front of their house to call the brother, a moment that the narrator savors.

Every day begins for this narrator with such glimpses of Mangan’s sister. He places himself in the front room of his house so he can see her leave her house, and then he rushes out to walk behind her quietly until finally passing her. The narrator and Mangan’s sister talk little, but she is always in his thoughts. He thinks about her when he accompanies his aunt to do food shopping on Saturday evening in the busy marketplace and when he sits in the back room of his house alone. The narrator’s infatuation is so intense that he fears he will never gather the courage to speak with the girl and express his feelings.

One morning, Mangan’s sister asks the narrator if he plans to go to Araby, a Dublin bazaar. She notes that she cannot attend, as she has already committed to attend a retreat with her school. Having recovered from the shock of the conversation, the narrator offers to bring her something from the bazaar. This brief meeting launches the narrator into a period of eager, restless waiting and fidgety tension in anticipation of the bazaar. He cannot focus in school. He finds the lessons tedious, and they distract him from thinking about Mangan’s sister.

On the morning of the bazaar the narrator reminds his uncle that he plans to attend the event so that the uncle will return home early and provide train fare. Yet dinner passes and a guest visits, but the uncle does not return. The narrator impatiently endures the time passing, until at 9 p.m. the uncle finally returns, unbothered that he has forgotten about the narrator’s plans. Reciting the epigram “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” the uncle gives the narrator the money and asks him if he knows the poem “The Arab’s Farewell to his Steed.” The narrator leaves just as his uncle begins to recite the lines, and, thanks to eternally slow trains, arrives at the bazaar just before 10 p.m., when it is starting to close down. He approaches one stall that is still open, but buys nothing, feeling unwanted by the woman watching over the goods. With no purchase for Mangan’s sister, the narrator stands angrily in the deserted bazaar as the lights go out.

Analysis
In “Araby,” the allure of new love and distant places mingles with the familiarity of everyday drudgery, with frustrating consequences. Mangan’s sister embodies this mingling, since she is part of the familiar surroundings of the narrator’s street as well as the exotic promise of the bazaar. She is a “brown figure” who both reflects the brown façades of the buildings that line the street and evokes the skin color of romanticized images of Arabia that flood the narrator’s head. Like the bazaar that offers experiences that differ from everyday Dublin, Mangan’s sister intoxicates the narrator with new feelings of joy and elation. His love for her, however, must compete with the dullness of schoolwork, his uncle’s lateness, and the Dublin trains. Though he promises Mangan’s sister that he will go to Araby and purchase a gift for her, these mundane realities undermine his plans and ultimately thwart his desires. The narrator arrives at the bazaar only to encounter flowered teacups and English accents, not the freedom of the enchanting East. As the bazaar closes down, he realizes that Mangan’s sister will fail his expectations as well, and that his desire for her is actually only a vain wish for change.

The narrator’s change of heart concludes the story on a moment of epiphany, but not a positive one. Instead of reaffirming his love or realizing that he does not need gifts to express his feelings for Mangan’s sister, the narrator simply gives up. He seems to interpret his arrival at the bazaar as it fades into darkness as a sign that his relationship with Mangan’s sister will also remain just a wishful idea and that his infatuation was as misguided as his fantasies about the bazaar. What might have been a story of happy, youthful love becomes a tragic story of defeat. Much like the disturbing, unfulfilling adventure in “An Encounter,” the narrator’s failure at the bazaar suggests that fulfillment and contentedness remain foreign to Dubliners, even in the most unusual events of the city like an annual bazaar.

The tedious events that delay the narrator’s trip indicate that no room exists for love in the daily lives of Dubliners, and the absence of love renders the characters in the story almost anonymous. Though the narrator might imagine himself to be carrying thoughts of Mangan’s sister through his day as a priest would carry a Eucharistic chalice to an altar, the minutes tick away through school, dinner, and his uncle’s boring poetic recitation. Time does not adhere to the narrator’s visions of his relationship. The story presents this frustration as universal: the narrator is nameless, the girl is always “Mangan’s sister” as though she is any girl next door, and the story closes with the narrator imagining himself as a creature. In “Araby,” Joyce suggests that all people experience frustrated desire for love and new experiences.

Araby Setting

Araby Setting

  1. Open Free Essay
    Launch Free Essay and search for "Araby Setting" to start researching.
  2. Find the perfect essay
    Choose from tons of different essay in various lengths, styles and themes. Find the perfect Araby Setting essay to find and customize for your brainstorming needs.
  3. Brainstorm ideas and themes
    Use the essays you found on Araby Setting and extract the ideas from them. Use those ideas for the basis of your own essay.
  4. Cite your essay
    Remember to cite any essays you used for your new essay.

Start a New Essay on Araby Setting

How the Setting Reinforces the Theme and Characters in Araby



The setting in “Araby” reinforces the theme and the characters by using imagery of light and darkness. The experiences of the boy in James Joyce’s “Araby” illustrate how people often expect more than ordinary reality can provide and then feel disillusioned and disappointed. The author uses dark and obscure references to make the boy’s reality of living in the gloomy town of Araby more vivid. He uses dark and gloomy references to create the mood or atmosphere, then changes to bright light references when discussing Mangan’s sister.

The story expresses its theme through the setting, the characterization f the boy and his point of view as the narrator. Darkness is used throughout the story as the prevailing theme. James Joyce’s story begins at dusk and continues through the evening during the winter, in Araby Ireland. He chooses this gloomy setting to be the home of a young boy who is infatuated with his neighbors sister. The boy is young and naive and he leads a dull and boring life. Joyce uses darkness to make the boy’s reality more believable through more vivid, precise descriptions. Bright light is used to create a fairy tale world of dreams and illusions.
James Joyce uses the bright light when describing Mangan’s sister, the boy’s infatuation. The protagonist is infatuated with his neighbor’s sister and he imagines that he will heroically bring her something back from the bazaar. Joyce refers to bright light when discussing Mangan’s sister in order to give her a heavenly presence. Light is used to create a joyful atmosphere. The ending of the story is filled with images of darkness and light. James Joyce uses the lights of the bazaar to illustrate the boy’s confrontation with reality. The bazaar lights are almost all off because the bazaar is almost losed.

This is significant because the boy wants the bazaar to be bright and open, but it is dark and closed. This is when the boy finally realizes that life is not what he had dreamt it to be. He finds himself angry at life and disillusioned. James Joyce uses the setting to symbolize a key concept of the story. The dark disillusion the boy experiences is all part of growing up. The boy is no longer young and naive, he has grown up and become disillusioned with life. “Araby” shows how we all get ideas about how things will be and then feel disappointed with ourselves when things don’t work out as expected.

Araby Setting

Related Essay Topics

Araby Setting

FAQ

What long should essays be?

Generally, the length requirements are indicated in your assignment sheet. It can be words, paragraphs, or pages given as a range (300–500 words) or a particular number (5 pages). If you are not sure about your essay’s length, the number-one tip is to clarify it with your tutor. Also, if you’re not sure how to write an essay, we have a detailed guide on that topic, just follow the link.

What makes an effective essay?

An essay should have a single clear central idea. Each paragraph should have a clear main point or topic sentence. ... An essay or paper should be organized logically, flow smoothly, and "stick" together. In other words, everything in the writing should make sense to a reader.

What should be included on an essay?

A basic essay consists of three main parts: introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this format will help you write and organize an essay. However, flexibility is important. While keeping this basic essay format in mind, let the topic and specific assignment guide the writing and organization.

What They say About Free Essay

I also want to thank http://freeessay.com , pantip and wikipedia for make it happens. #storytelling

@Gusgustt

Browse Essays

  • Araby By James Joyce Araby By James Joyce Araby By James Joyce The short story, Araby, by James Joyce is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will alleviate his miserable life. Throughout the story he battles withdrawal and a lack of control. Moreover, the themes of alienation and control are inherently linked because the source of the boy\'s emotional distance is his lack of control over his life. The story begins as the boy describes his neighborhood. Immediately a feeling of aliena...
  • Araby Araby Araby And Sunrise On Veld Awareness Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and dissimilar aspects of both ch...
  • AP Language and Composition: Summer Assignment AP Language and Composition: Summer Assignment AP Language and Composition: Summer Assignment Mrs. Staci Davis (sdavis5@interact.ccsd.net) Dr. Soo Park (spark@interact.ccsd.net) Mrs. Melissa Villanueva (mnvillanueva@interact.ccsd.net) Dear Students, Congratulations! You have taken the first step towards success in college by accepting the challenge of Advanced Placement English Language and Composition. You are about to begin a great adventure that will broaden your horizons. The work begins now, as you plan to complete summer readings and ...
  • Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and di...
  • Araby, James Joyce Araby, James Joyce Araby, James Joyce Comment on the narrative voice of the story. Why does the boy get disillusioned at the end of the story? Does the confrontation with the reality take place only at the end? At what moment in the story and in what details does he confront the actual? The narrative voice of Araby by James Joyce is the author taking on the role of a male whose name is never mentioned. From the description of the setting we learn that he lives with his aunt and uncle in a working class area of Dub...
  • Araby Araby Araby The story Araby, by James Joyce, shows how people often expect more than that which ordinary reality can provide and consequently feel disappointed when they do not receive what they expect. Another fascinating piece of literature is the poetry collection The Black Riders and Other Lines by Stephen Crane. What, if anything, does one have to do with the other? This paper will compare one of Crane\'s poems to Joyce\'s story. Araby tells the story of a young boy\'s disillusionment with li...
  • Short story summaries Short story summaries Short story summaries Short stories, magazine articles, poems, essays, reports and many more forms of literature can be written with informative aspects in ways that are interesting. Authoras often prefer to gain the readers\' attention during the beginning lines of their pieces and to keep that attention throughout their writing. They do this by strategically using interesting and informative writing. This essay will show how authors use interesting and informative writing by reviewing four sel...
  • Araby Araby Araby The setting in Araby reinforces the theme and characters by using imagery of light and darkness. The experiences of the boy in James Joyces Araby illustrate how people often expect more than reality can provide and become disillusioned and disappointed. The author uses dark and obscure references to make the boys reality of living in a gloomy town more vivid. He uses gloomy references to create the mood of the story, and then changes to bright light references when talking about Man...
  • Araby Araby Araby Convinced that the Dublin of the 1900\'s was a center of spiri-tual paralysis, James Joyce loosely but thematically tied together hisstories in Dubliners by means of their common setting. Each of thestories consists of a portrait in which Dublin contributes in some wayto the dehumanizing experience of modem life. The boy in the story Araby is intensely subject to the city\'s dark, hopeless conformity,and his tragic yearning toward the exotic in the face of drab, uglyreality forms the cente...
  • Araby, James Joyce Araby, James Joyce Araby, James Joyce Comment on the narrative voice of the story. Why does the boy get disillusioned at the end of the story? Does the confrontation with the reality take place only at the end? At what moment in the story and in what details does he confront the actual? The narrative voice of Araby by James Joyce is the author taking on the role of a male whose name is never mentioned. From the description of the setting we learn that he lives with his aunt and uncle in a working class area of Dub...
  • Formal Analysis of James Joyce8217s 8220Araby8221 Formal Analysis of James Joyce8217s 8220Araby8221 Formal Analysis of James Joyce8217s 8220Araby8221 The experience of the boy in James Joyces Araby illustrates how people often expect more than everyday reality can provide and upon that realization, they often feel disillusioned and disappointed. By using dark and obscure references, Joyce gives a more vivid picture of the boy\'s reality of living in the gloomy town of Araby. He uses dark and gloomy references to create the mood or atmosphere, and then transitions to bright light reference...
  • Araby - Modernist Perspective Araby - Modernist Perspective Araby - Modernist Perspective Araby - Modernist perspective In 'Araby', the narrator is a young boy whose life up to this point has been simple and happy. The monotony of his life nurtures his childhood happiness and innocence, and from this state the boy is introduced to Joyce's version of reality that has been lurking before his eyes his entire life. Through hours spent at play on North Richmond Street outside his house our narrator is conditioned into a blissful state, and a hidden crush on h...
  • Araby Araby Araby Araby by James Joyce In Araby James Joyce explores the theme that adulthood is not always what it seems. The narrator in the story is the main character and he demonstrates this theme when he falls in love with the girl in his neighborhood. In the beginning the young boy is too shy to express his feeling towards her. Later in the story he tells her of a present that he is going to bring her from the bazzar. Lastly he realizes that he has failed and now has lost his chance with this girl an...
  • Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and di...
  • Brave new world and dubliners Brave new world and dubliners Brave new world and dubliners Brave New World, written by Aldous Huxley, is a thought provoking novel set in a future of genetically engineered people, amazing technology and a misconstrued system of values. Dubliners, written by James Joyce, is a collection of short stories painting a picture of life in Dublin Ireland, near the turn of the 19th century. Though of two completely different settings and story lines, these two works can and will be compared and contrasted on the basis of the social...
  • Araby Light vision and beauty Araby Light vision and beauty Araby Light vision and beauty Light, vision and beauty by NWOSDM The setting in Araby reinforces the theme and the characters by using imagery of light, darkness and beauty. The experiences of the boy in James Joyce\'s Araby illustrate how people often expect more than ordinary reality can provide thus causing disillusionment as well as disappointment. The author uses dark and obscure references to make the boy\'s reality of living in the gloomy town of Araby more vivid. He uses dark and g...
  • James Joyces Dubliners - Setting and Theme in Ara James Joyces Dubliners - Setting and Theme in Ara James Joyce's Dubliners - Setting and Theme in Araby Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays How the Setting Reinforces the Theme and Characters in Araby The setting in Araby reinforces the theme and the characters by using imagery of light and darkness. The experiences of the boy in James Joyce's Araby illustrate how people often expect more than ordinary reality can provide and then feel disillusioned and disappointed. The author uses dark and obscure references to make the boy...
  • Great Gatsby 15 Short Essays Great Gatsby 15 Short Essays Great Gatsby 15 Short Essays Have you ever felt that there were two of you battling for control of the person you call yourself? Have you ever felt that you weren\'t quite sure which one you wanted to be in charge? All of us have at least two selves: one who wants to work hard, get good grades, and be successful; and one who would rather lie in the sun and listen to music and daydream. To understand F. Scott Fitzgerald, the man and the writer, you must begin with the idea of doubleness, or twone...
  • Common Themes In Short Stories Common Themes In Short Stories Common Themes In Short Stories James Joyce, a most prestigious author of many titles, has incorporated into his works many different thoughts, life experiences, as well as themes. Those three things that he used in his works I believe are what made him the awesome author he is today. The main focus of this paper is to inform you of the themes that reoccur in many of his short stories. Some themes that I noticed were: family, frustration, dreams of escape, love infatuations, and finally, sin. Fam...
  • Dream Versus Reality: Setting and Atmosphere in Ja Dream Versus Reality: Setting and Atmosphere in Ja Dream Versus Reality: Setting and Atmosphere in James Joyce\'s Araby Convinced that the Dublin of the 1900\'s was a center of spiri-tual paralysis, James Joyce loosely but thematically tied together hisstories in Dubliners by means of their common setting. Each of thestories consists of a portrait in which Dublin contributes in some wayto the dehumanizing experience of modem life. The boy in the storyAraby is intensely subject to the city\'s dark, hopeless conformity,and his tragic yearning ...
  • Araby Araby Araby Two Short Stories Of Awareness Beyond Oneself: Araby And A Sunrise On The Veld Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narr...
  • Two Short Stories Of Awareness Beyond Oneself: Ar Two Short Stories Of Awareness Beyond Oneself: Ar Two Short Stories Of Awareness Beyond Oneself: Araby And A Sunrise On The Veld Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators,...
  • Araby By James Joyce Araby By James Joyce Araby By James Joyce The short story, Araby, by James Joyce is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will alleviate his miserable life. Throughout the story he battles withdrawal and a lack of control. Moreover, the themes of alienation and control are inherently linked because the source of the boy\'s emotional distance is his lack of control over his life. The story begins as the boy describes his neighborhood. Immediately a feeling of aliena...
  • Araby Araby Araby The story Araby, by James Joyce, shows how people often expect more than that which ordinary reality can provide and consequently feel disappointed when they do not receive what they expect. Another fascinating piece of literature is the poetry collection The Black Riders and Other Lines by Stephen Crane. What, if anything, does one have to do with the other? This paper will compare one of Crane\'s poems to Joyce\'s story. Araby tells the story of a young boy\'s disillusionment with li...
  • Two Short Stories Of Awareness Two Short Stories Of Awareness Two Short Stories Of Awareness Two Short Stories Of Awareness Beyond Oneself: Araby And A Sunrise On The Veld Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which theprotagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiatedinto new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will beexamined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the natu...