Immigrants

This essay Immigrants has a total of 1654 words and 8 pages.


Immigrants
Should the United States take on more immigrants? Is the United States hurting from immigration problems? These issues have been debated on for generation. "According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, approximately 300,000 illegal immigrants enter the United States annually" (Cozic 12). This large number of immigrants causes many different emotions. For some Americans, immigration is an adversity. Many Americans past and present have reacted to immigrants with fear: fear of unemployment and lower standards of living, fear of different religions and races, fear that immigration is spoiling the U.S. for those already here. The issues of immigration has three important topics: first, the understanding of the history behind immigration. Second, the effect immigration has on the United States. Third and finally, the economic issues associated with immigration today.

The history of immigration in the United States is quite interesting. Between 1820, when the U.S. begin keeping count, and 1987, over fifty-four million people left their former homes and migrated to the U.S. (McClellan 12). With the exception of native Americans and African-American descendants of slaves, everyone in the U.S. today is an immigrant or is descended from immigrates. It is really quite interesting that Americans today feel so strongly against immigration when if fact they themselves are immigrants. "Today the United States takes in more immigrants than all of the other world\'s nations combined" (Dudley 13). However, even though these facts are true, Americans seem to continue to fear immigration.

During the late 1980 the government passed a immigration act called the Simpson-Rodio Act. This allowed all illegal immigrates living in the country since 1982, legalization. "This allowed more than 3 million aliens to live here" (Griffin, 363). It also gave employers strict fines for hiring illegal immigrants without documentation. "The idea behind the employer sanctions was to diminish or eliminate the demand for undocumented workers, there by reducing their incentives to enter the country" (McConnell 731). This did in fact slow down the number of illegal aliens simple because their was no jobs that existed for them. However, some illegal immigrates were once legal, with a visa. This gave them the right to work in the United States; however, the visa expired making them illegal. "Experts say roughly 40 percent of the 200,000 to 300,000 people who

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